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Waffle Breakfast Sushi Rolls

Waffle Breakfast Sushi Rolls


Serve up waffles shaped like sushi made with strawberries, pancakes, and cream cheese! A fun new take on breakfast food the family will love. MORE+LESS-

1

cup Bisquick™ Original baking mix

8

ounces whipped cream cheese

Strawberries, banana, pineapple (and/or any other fruit of your choice)

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  • 1

    Slice your fruit into long, thin matchstick shapes so they fit well in the roll.

  • 2

    Preheat your pizzelle maker while you mix the sugar, egg, and Bisquick™.

  • 3

    Put heaping tablespoons of dough onto the pizzelle maker for each pizelle. My pizzelle maker forms one large rectangle pizzelle when you put too much filling in, and this is actually what we want to happen here. Cook only about 30 seconds. If you cook it too long, it will firm up before you have a chance to roll it.

  • 4

    Lay the pizzelle on to your cutting board. Spread cream cheese over it. Top with whichever fruit you want. Be careful not to overfill!

  • 5

    Carefully wrap the pizzelle into a tube shape with the fillings in the center. Make sure the seam is sealed with a little of the cream cheese. Use a sharp knife to cut the tube into smaller rounds. Line the rounds up on a plate like sushi, and serve it with some syrup instead of soy sauce.

No nutrition information available for this recipe

More About This Recipe

  • Even though these aren't real sushi rolls made with fish and rice, they totally make up in pure fun!When I set out to make some sort of sushi-shaped thing with waffles, I expected it to be this daunting task that took me hours in the kitchen and would have to be propped up or faked to look good. It turned out totally opposite! These Waffle Breakfast Sushi Rolls were shockingly easy to make, and very sturdy – in fact, they were much less fragile than some sushi rolls I’ve made in the past.The key to the recipe was using pizzelles (instead of full-blown waffles) as the shell to hold everything together. Pizzelles are sturdy, easy to make, and even firm up after a few minutes to really keep everything together nicely. When pouring the batter be sure to overload your pizzelle maker so it comes out as one whole rectangle.I filled mine with strawberries, bananas, and pineapple, but really though, just like sushi, the possibilities are endless.Make sure you line them up to make it look like sushi. And don’t forget the syrup for dipping!

These Pillsbury's Cinnamon Roll Waffles With Cream Cheese Glaze Taste Even Better Than They Look

I love a good mashup dish, like hamburger pizza or chocolate ravioli, so I was downright delighted (and, to be honest, my culinary bone was tickled) when I discovered Pillsbury's recipe for cinnamon roll waffles with cream cheese glaze. This dish gives you the crispiness of waffles with the buttery cinnamon swirl of cinnamon rolls, and it's all topped off with a delectably indulgent cream cheese glaze. All you need to make these luscious waffles is a can of Pillsbury Grands! Cinnamon Rolls with Cream Cheese Icing, a little milk, some powdered sugar, a touch of vanilla, and your trusty waffle iron. In less than ten minutes, your weekend brunches will be ten times better.

I like to make the glaze while my waffle iron is heating up to save time. And just make sure to cook the cinnamon rolls in your waffle iron for only three to four minutes - any longer and they can get a little too chewy. Once they finish cooking, drizzle immediately with the glaze and garnish with a dash of cinnamon. Enjoy!


A Beginner's Guide to Eating Sushi

At some point in time, what possibly began as a method to preserve fish in the Mekong Valley of Southeast Asia, the sushi travelled to Japan and over the centuries of its existence reached such high levels of evolution that today it's pretty much an art form. ( Sushi, Sliced and Diced ) In the American documentary Jiro Dreams of Sushi, Ono Jiro says, “The most important part of making good sushi is this: creating a union between the rice and the fish. If they are not in complete harmony, the sushi won't taste good.” And he could not have been more accurate.A popular feature in Japanese cuisine the world over, the modern sushi rarely looks like its original self today. Chef Kamlesh Joshi of EDO, ITC Gardenia Bengaluru has been working with Japanese food for more than a decade, and says that when he began his career in New Delhi, it was the one cuisine that surprised him immensely. “I couldn't imagine people were eating raw fish,” he says.(Gourmet Food - RAW)The Art of Eating SushiFor a first timer, the art of eating sushi can be a formidable task. But the tricks are fairly simple if you don't let the whole presentation of it get to you. Sushi is typically served with three condiments on the side - soy sauce, a dollop of wasabi (a dry green paste), and gari (pickled ginger). Interestingly, it's hard to source real wasabi, which is actually a plant, outside of Japan. Most restaurants replace it with horseradish, which has the similar pungency of the wasabi plant, mustard, starch, and the green food colouring of course. Real wasabi is way more pungent than we are used to.

Japanese cuisine added to world heritage listTraditionally, sushi is eaten with hands, and this is also why you ought to wash your hands before you start. In the case of a nigiri, you need to turn the sushi around (rice up, fish down), lightly dip it into the soy making sure that you don't dip the whole thing in, and eat it. For convenience what you can also do is mix the wasabi in the soy and then dip the sushi into it. Usually, chefs smear a little bit of wasabi between the fish and the rice the extra bit is given if you want more.How to cook sushi riceNori is one of the primary ingredients that is used while preparing sushi as it acts as a wrapper to hold certain types of sushi together. It is a kind of edible seaweed, and normally available as paper-thin green sheets in the supermarkets.Sea Spaghetti in the Supermarket: the Unstoppable Rise of SeaweedThe Sushi GuideThere aren't too many Japanese restaurants in the city, but the numbers are enough to keep sushi lovers happy in fact, most people in the city don't even veer beyond the sushi when it comes to eating Japanese food.You can't really ‘know' sushi, unless you've spent years meditating before it, or eaten every possible sushi that has come out of every restaurant worth its name. However, here are a few basic ones to help you get started.Hosomaki


It's a traditional roll and is normally smaller than a standard sushi roll. When made with tuna, it's called a Tekka Maki. A hosomaki usually uses a single ingredient, and the nori sheet is on the outside. It's a popular roll too, probably because you can pop a whole one into your mouth without having to make a mess.Uramaki


Uramaki is not exactly a traditional form of sushi but then again it's as popular as some of the older varieties. In this version, the main ingredients (in this case avocado and salmon) are wrapped with nori first and then coated with rice and made into a roll. Slight garnish such as flying fish roe or sesame seeds adds a bit of crunch and colour to sushi.Temaki
It looks like a waffle made of nori and stuffed with rice and other ingredients. In this, the chef uses shiitake mushroom (braised in soya, mirin, and sugar) and hand rolls a nori sheet to form a cone and then stuffs the rice in along with mushrooms. It's important that the ingredients pretend to spill out of the cone. To eat a temaki, there are two rules: first, eat it quickly, before the nori sheet loses its texture and ends up feeling like a piece of cloth, and second, use your hands.(Japanese Food Season Kicks off in India with Sushi Class)Nigirizushi
Earlier known as Edo-Mae Zushi, mostly because it was made with fresh fish from the Edo Bay, today's nigirizushi is actually just affordable food for common people. It has come a long way though, and is one of the most popular sushis in Japan and other parts of the world. A nigiri is nothing but a mound of vinegared rice topped with a fish of your choice – salmon, tuna, cuttlefish, red snapper and shrimp are some of the popular ones. Sometimes a nigiri is tied with a thin nori strip to keep the rice and fish in place. In nigiri, slicing is very important, says chef Joshi, and adds, “It depends on the kind of fish you're using. Some might require thin slices and some might need slightly thicker slices. You can also swipe a bit of wasabi on the rice ball and shape it by hand.”Gunkanmaki
The gunkanmaki dates back to the 40s, so it hasn't been around for too long. It's an oval-vertical sushi where a ball of rice is wrapped with nori, leaving some space on top. The empty space is then filled with different ingredients such as scallops, roe, etc. One can say that it's an offshoot of the nigiri, but is quite different too.Samurai Maki
A contemporary version of sushi, this roll is best for those who don't like to eat raw fish, and is derived from the uramaki. In this version, a single piece of tempura prawn is taken, rolled in nori, and then covered with rice. Using a bamboo sheet, it is shaped. Once that's done, the roll is topped with sliced salmon and then torched, resulting in an almost cooked sushi roll. It is garnished with a drop of Japanese mayo and edible flowers.(Japan's Ever-Traditional Sushi Now Comes With Futuristic Technology)Rainbow RollThe rainbow roll is just a prettier version of the uramaki, and very new. One can use different kinds of fish (salmon, tuna, shrimp, red snapper) and pair with it cucumber, avocado, green onion shoots etc. before making it into a roll. The roll is then topped with alternate slices of fish and avocado/cucumber, and cut into sections before being served.Chirashizushi
This is probably one of the oldest and simplest forms of sushi to have ever been devised. And there are no rules here either. A bowl of sushi rice is topped up with different kinds of fish (raw) and vegetables and even garnishes. But that's in the Edo region. Other parts of Japan tweak the combinations and ingredients a bit and even the serving style could be different. No wonder that it's called Scattered Sushi.California Roll/Boston RollWhen the sushi travelled to the US of A, it became kind of hard for people to digest raw fish. That's when the California Roll was born. It's a deviation from the uramaki and is typically made with crabmeat and cucumber. The Boston Roll on the other hand, which is a variation of the California Roll, poached shrimp replaces the crabmeat. In Bengaluru, it continues to be one of the most popularly served and eaten forms of sushi. ( Recipe for California Roll ) OshizushiA specialty of Osaka, this sushi is horizontal and rectangular, pressed down into shape with the help of a traditional wooden mold. For sushi virgins, the good news is that none of the fish used is raw. Plus it looks really pretty, and clean. Here too, the rice is on the outside.Disclaimer:The opinions expressed within this article are the personal opinions of the author. NDTV is not responsible for the accuracy, completeness, suitability, or validity of any information on this article. All information is provided on an as-is basis. The information, facts or opinions appearing in the article do not reflect the views of NDTV and NDTV does not assume any responsibility or liability for the same.
Brittany Cutler

My favorite roll to order when I go out is the spicy California roll. When going out to eat is too big of a hassle, I just use this recipe to make my own at home. It's a great roll to try when you're still a sushi beginner because you don't have to deal with any raw fish.


Ingredients:

  • 1 can Pillsbury Grands refrigerated cinnamon rolls with cream cheese icing
  • 1 cup confectioners&rsquo sugar
  • 3 tbs milk
  • 1 teas vanilla

Preparation:

Preheat your waffle maker and coat with cooking spray. Remove dough from can.

Place one roll in the center of your waffle maker (mine makes two at once, so in that case, one rolls in the middle of each). Close and cook for 3-4 minutes.

Whisk together the icing from the package, confectioners&rsquo sugar, milk, and vanilla until smooth and serve over hot waffles. *I omitted this and just used the icing as it &ndash I can only take so much sweet in the morning.

Please go check out Dinners Dishes and Desserts. Erin is hosting a bake sale to help raise funds for the recent Colorado wildfires.

Also please check out the pancake love going on over at Rachel Cooks. Yesterdays Cheddar Apple Pancakes from Fat Girl Trapped in a Skinny Body looked INSANE . That girl knows the way to my heart!


100 Easy Food On A Stick Options

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Our summer mentorship program will feature a host of new mentors we're excited to connect you with, including:

Linda Xu, Entrepreneur and E-Commerce Expert

Linda is the co-founder and chief growth officer at Cart.com, a Series-A e-commerce technology platform that partners with brands to help them grow. Linda served as head of growth at Sitari Ventures where she oversaw strategy and operations. She has acquired and advised tech and consumer companies as a private equity investor at global firms including The Riverside Company and Lazard. Additionally, Linda spent a brief stint on the team launching Uber Freight. She loves all things food and plants.

Stephanie Cartin, Social Media Expert + Entrepreneur

An entrepreneur at heart, Stephanie walked away from her corporate career in 2012 to follow her passion to launch Socialfly, a leading social-first digital and influencer marketing agency based in New York City. Socialfly has since blossomed to over 30 full-time employees and has been named to Inc. 5000's fastest growing private companies two years in a row. The agency has worked with over 200 well-known brands including Girl Scouts, WeTV, Conair, Nest Fragrances, 20th Century Fox and Univision. Stephanie is the co-host of the Entreprenista Podcast and co-author of Like, Love, Follow: The Entreprenista's Guide to Using Social Media To Grow Your Business. She is also a recent recipient of the SmartCEO Brava award, which recognizes the top female CEOs in New York and a Stevie Award for Women Run Workplace of the Year.

Kristina Ross, Content Creator + Social Media Whiz

Kristina Makes #Content is a social media ✨funtrepreneur✨, creative strategist, and public speaker for all things Internet related. Four years as a magazine editor and producer/copywriter in the world of advertising (Mercedes, Cancer Research, French Kiss Records), Kristina packed her bags and decided to go remote with social media as she saw a booming industry. Since then, she built @thefabstory from 10k to 1m followers in just 18 months and now specializes in creative strategies behind social media advertising and user acquisition. Her campaigns have levelled apps from the top 50 into #1 in their app store categories overnight. Kristina's work and experiences have been featured in Forbes, Thrive Global and has given several talks at Harvard Business School on the big bad world of #content.

A.V. Perkins, Selfmade Alum and Creator of AVdoeswhat

A.V. is a DIY expert and creator of Avdoeswhat.com. What began as a traditional Do-It-Yourself blog has grown into a lifestyle platform that includes crafts, upcycled furniture and pop culture. As a digital host for HGTV Handmade, along with appearances in Bustle, The Pioneer Woman, and BuzzFeed, A.V. is determined to help thrifty millennials realize "Life is better when you Do-It-Yourself!" A.V. is also the co-creator of University of Dope, an exciting thought-provoking card game that celebrates Hip Hop culture.The first of its kind.

David Mesfin, Creative Director + Brand Expert

David is a multi-disciplinary designer and creative director with award-winning integrated campaign background, including the Super Bowl, FIFA, NFL, and global launch campaign. He has created global partnerships to increase brand awareness through traditional, digital, social, and experimental marketing campaigns, collaborating with C-suite leaders from Genesis, Hyundai, Honda, Sony, Adidas, Oakley, Toyota, Neutrogena, Land more to communicate their company's vision through creative and marketing. He has earned awards from Cannes, One Show, Clio, Webby, EFFIE, Communication Arts, Google Creative Sandbox, OC and LA ADDY, DIGIDAY, TED | Ads Worth Spreading, American Advertising Federation, FWA, The A-List Hollywood Awards, IAB Mixx, and Graphis.

Jasmine Plouffe, Brand Strategist

Jasmin is a brand strategist/graphic designer who helps female entrepreneurs attract their dream customers by sharing their story and taking their branding and graphic design to a whole new level.

Plus, our Selfmade Alum will be there to guide you along the way! Go from feeling alone to feeling deeply connected to a community of like-minded women. Our professional business and career coaches will encourage you to take the next step toward your biz goals via weekly Accountability Pods. Students will have access to a wide community of like-minded entrepreneurs, including experts, founders, future business partners, freelancers, and more.

This summer, Selfmade coaches include Niki Shamdasani, co-founder and CEO of Sani, a South Asian-inspired fashion brand Emily Merrell, founder and chief networking officer of female-focused networking organization Six Degrees Society Dr. Annie Vovan, whose career spans the corporate world, non-profit space, and service-based and e-commerce businesses and Cachet Prescott, a business mindset coach and strategist.

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  • ⅔ cup water
  • ⅓ cup medium-grain white rice, uncooked
  • 6 tablespoons rice vinegar
  • 4 sheets nori (dry seaweed)
  • 4 ounces smoked salmon, cut into strips
  • 2 ounces cold cream cheese, cut into thin strips
  • 4 scallions, sliced into thin strips

Bring water and rice to a boil in a saucepan. Reduce heat to medium-low, cover, and simmer until rice is tender and water has been absorbed, 20 to 25 minutes. Remove from the heat and cool, about 10 minutes. Toss with vinegar.

Place 1 sheet of nori on a rolling mat, layer with 1/4 of the rice, and press rice out to the edges. Lay 1/4 of the salmon, 1/4 of the cream cheese, and 1/4 of the scallions in the center. Roll up carefully and wrap in plastic wrap. Repeat with remaining nori, rice, salmon, cream cheese, and scallions. Place in the refrigerator until chilled, at least 1 hour.

Remove sushi rolls from the refrigerator, discard plastic wrap, and cut each roll into 6 slices. Layer all rolls on a platter.


15 Festive Birthday Desserts That Aren't Cake

Starting your own business can feel isolating without a network of women to bounce off ideas, ask questions, and cheer you on along the way. Enter Selfmade, Brit + Co's 10-week highly-interactive virtual course that brings together top female entrepreneurs to teach you how to build a new business — from business plan to promotion — or grow your existing one.

The best part? Selfmade now provides one-on-one mentoring with successful entrepreneurs who've been where you are right now and who care about making a difference for women in business. They include business owners, founders, VCs, and subject-matter experts in industries such as finance, advertising, marketing, licensing, fashion, and media.

Our summer mentorship program will feature a host of new mentors we're excited to connect you with, including:

Linda Xu, Entrepreneur and E-Commerce Expert

Linda is the co-founder and chief growth officer at Cart.com, a Series-A e-commerce technology platform that partners with brands to help them grow. Linda served as head of growth at Sitari Ventures where she oversaw strategy and operations. She has acquired and advised tech and consumer companies as a private equity investor at global firms including The Riverside Company and Lazard. Additionally, Linda spent a brief stint on the team launching Uber Freight. She loves all things food and plants.

Stephanie Cartin, Social Media Expert + Entrepreneur

An entrepreneur at heart, Stephanie walked away from her corporate career in 2012 to follow her passion to launch Socialfly, a leading social-first digital and influencer marketing agency based in New York City. Socialfly has since blossomed to over 30 full-time employees and has been named to Inc. 5000's fastest growing private companies two years in a row. The agency has worked with over 200 well-known brands including Girl Scouts, WeTV, Conair, Nest Fragrances, 20th Century Fox and Univision. Stephanie is the co-host of the Entreprenista Podcast and co-author of Like, Love, Follow: The Entreprenista's Guide to Using Social Media To Grow Your Business. She is also a recent recipient of the SmartCEO Brava award, which recognizes the top female CEOs in New York and a Stevie Award for Women Run Workplace of the Year.

Kristina Ross, Content Creator + Social Media Whiz

Kristina Makes #Content is a social media ✨funtrepreneur✨, creative strategist, and public speaker for all things Internet related. Four years as a magazine editor and producer/copywriter in the world of advertising (Mercedes, Cancer Research, French Kiss Records), Kristina packed her bags and decided to go remote with social media as she saw a booming industry. Since then, she built @thefabstory from 10k to 1m followers in just 18 months and now specializes in creative strategies behind social media advertising and user acquisition. Her campaigns have levelled apps from the top 50 into #1 in their app store categories overnight. Kristina's work and experiences have been featured in Forbes, Thrive Global and has given several talks at Harvard Business School on the big bad world of #content.

A.V. Perkins, Selfmade Alum and Creator of AVdoeswhat

A.V. is a DIY expert and creator of Avdoeswhat.com. What began as a traditional Do-It-Yourself blog has grown into a lifestyle platform that includes crafts, upcycled furniture and pop culture. As a digital host for HGTV Handmade, along with appearances in Bustle, The Pioneer Woman, and BuzzFeed, A.V. is determined to help thrifty millennials realize "Life is better when you Do-It-Yourself!" A.V. is also the co-creator of University of Dope, an exciting thought-provoking card game that celebrates Hip Hop culture.The first of its kind.

David Mesfin, Creative Director + Brand Expert

David is a multi-disciplinary designer and creative director with award-winning integrated campaign background, including the Super Bowl, FIFA, NFL, and global launch campaign. He has created global partnerships to increase brand awareness through traditional, digital, social, and experimental marketing campaigns, collaborating with C-suite leaders from Genesis, Hyundai, Honda, Sony, Adidas, Oakley, Toyota, Neutrogena, Land more to communicate their company's vision through creative and marketing. He has earned awards from Cannes, One Show, Clio, Webby, EFFIE, Communication Arts, Google Creative Sandbox, OC and LA ADDY, DIGIDAY, TED | Ads Worth Spreading, American Advertising Federation, FWA, The A-List Hollywood Awards, IAB Mixx, and Graphis.

Jasmine Plouffe, Brand Strategist

Jasmin is a brand strategist/graphic designer who helps female entrepreneurs attract their dream customers by sharing their story and taking their branding and graphic design to a whole new level.

Plus, our Selfmade Alum will be there to guide you along the way! Go from feeling alone to feeling deeply connected to a community of like-minded women. Our professional business and career coaches will encourage you to take the next step toward your biz goals via weekly Accountability Pods. Students will have access to a wide community of like-minded entrepreneurs, including experts, founders, future business partners, freelancers, and more.

This summer, Selfmade coaches include Niki Shamdasani, co-founder and CEO of Sani, a South Asian-inspired fashion brand Emily Merrell, founder and chief networking officer of female-focused networking organization Six Degrees Society Dr. Annie Vovan, whose career spans the corporate world, non-profit space, and service-based and e-commerce businesses and Cachet Prescott, a business mindset coach and strategist.

Ready to take your business idea to the next level? Enroll in Selfmade Summer session today!


Love it or hate it, every country has their own take on sushi. While some of the creations, such as the California roll, are fairly tame and are now accepted as part of a normal sushi menu, we’ve also seen some of the odder versions out there, such as Hong Kong’s ‘killer sushi’, Nutella sushi in France, and my personal favorite–the absolutely adorable but sadly inedible cat sushi!

The quintessential component of sushi is vinegared rice, so while these creations can’t technically be called sushi, they’ve definitely taken a stylistic cue from the rolled shape of makizushi. And we have to admit, some of those fillings do look tasty…

Which of the following creations do you find most intriguing?

1. Waffle breakfast sushi

Tablespoon

2. Burrito sushi

Imgur

3. Fairy bread sushi

Smart Party Planning

4. Zucchini sushi

Ask Me Food

5. Peanut butter and jelly sushi

All Recipes

6. Banana and Nutella sushi

Inspired Housewife

7. Thai coconut sticky rice with mango sushi

Chef this Up!

8. St. Patrick’s Day sushi (mashed potato, corned beef, and cabbage)

The Cooking of Joy

9. Snickers sushi (peanut butter and Nutella)

MOMables

10. Chicken and waffle sushi

Tablespoon

11. Sandwich sushi

STL Cooks

12. Prosciutto, melon, and brie sushi

The Hopeless Housewife

13. Fruit “frushi” sushi

Kids Activities Blog

14. Marshmallow Peeps sushi

Bit Rebels

15. Tiramisu “tiramisushi” sushi

Dessert First

16. Southern-style sushi (flank steak, asparagus, Gorgonzola)

Food Network

17. Pizza sushi

Sushi à la Maison

18. Strawberry shortcake sushi

Take a Megabite

19. Cupcake sushi

Brit + Co

20. Cheeseburger sushi

The Gook

Are you now feeling inspired to make your very own version of sushi? Or are you just plain grossed out at this point?

Here’s what some Japanese people had to say after seeing their country’s classic food made with such a bizarre host of ingredients:

“Just because it’s rolled doesn’t make it sushi, people!!”

“It’s from a different dimension…”

“Japanese people have also changed ramen around quite a lot. It’s immature to complain about sushi being tampered with a bit. But still, over half of those look disgusting, haha.”

“Peanut butter and Nutella? Even someone like me with a huge sweet tooth is surprised.”

“I’d actually like to try the one wrapped in meat and the tiramisu one. The rest are too much like dessert for me.”

“I’m so glad I was born in Japan.”

“I’d get mad if people insisted on calling these ‘Japanese food,’ but I think the transmission of culture and the sushi’s changed appearance is good if people can enjoy them in their respective locations. Time will decide which ones are popular and refine them even more.”

Personally, I think I’ll pass on the Peeps sushi…unless someone wants to have fun blowing them up in the microwave with me.