New recipes

Beyoncé's Favorite Foods on the Road Slideshow

Beyoncé's Favorite Foods on the Road Slideshow


Blue Sky Soda

While grocery shopping with a friend, Beyoncé snapped up this photo of Blue Sky soda. Wonder what the significance is?

Jalapeño

Talk about spicy. This Texan girl stays true to her handle and shoots before she eats.

Chocolate

Chocolate-covered cherries are what are on this divas menu.

Corona

Rocking a colorful ensemble, Knowles has time to swig a bottle of Corona.

Food Trucks

Beyoncé, her sister Solange, and her dancers hit up Food Shark, a food truck in Marfa, Texas, that serves up "Mediterranean by-way-of-West Texas," according to their site.

Grocery Shopping

No personal shoppers here, Beyonc does her own grocery shopping, thank you.

Bread and Beer

Hovis bread, a British brand, plus Bootylicious beer put the combination together. A little symbolic, yes?

Tecate

This Mexican import is yet another favorite of the singers as she snaps and sips.


Food to glow

•Eat little and often this helps with discomfort. Aim for three small but calorific meals and 2-3 snacks or nourishing drinks (milkshakes, fortified milk) meals a day. OR any permutation of this ideal. Some people find it easiest to eat a little something every two hours rather than think in terms of meals as such. Whatever suits you and keeps you comfortable and nourished is good.

•Choose a variety of foods from the low-fibre list. Grazing from this list will keep things from getting boring and will give a fair spread of nutrients. I am planning an ebook of suitable recipes. But in the meantime please have a look at Easy and Delicious Low-Fibre Recipes.

•If you are advised to follow a restricted diet for more than five days ask your treatment team about multivitamin/mineral supplements. You are at risk of not getting enough of the water-soluble vitamins like Vitamin C (cooking destroys them) if this diet is followed long term.

* Your appetite will probably fluctuate but do try and keep eating regularly. Regular eating helps with appetite and bowel function.

* Capitalise on eating when you are hungry, not when you think you should eat. With that in mind, don’t worry about eating at the ‘wrong times’ or eating meals out of sequence: if you fancy having a bowl of Rice Krispies at 2 a.m., just do it. Have quick snack and easily heated meals available for any time that hunger strikes.

o A serving is roughly 80 grams

Whole grain breads, pasta, grains, rice, noodles and anything made with these herbs (even chopped ones) strong cheeses yogurt with fruit skin or seeds most raw vegetables and fruits tough meat/chunky meat dried fruit and prune juice (check fibre of any juices you buy), olives, all beans, pulses, nuts, seeds and whole grains food with whole coconut/desiccated coconut popcorn horseradish cocoa powder (high in insoluble fibre), highly spiced food and dressings/sauces. You may or may not be allowed chocolate/chocolate syrup: check. Other foods may be allowed/disallowed by your doctor, so do ask.

Fiber Guardian – a US site with 900 foods sorted by type

Fiber Content of Foods (choose foods by clicking on the alphabet selection bar) – comprehensive overview of American products and raw foods

How To Eat A Low Fiber Diet (slightly annoying, but useful, slideshow) – Health.com

 Kellie Anderson 2012 (updated 29 March 2015)

juicing fruits and vegetables you have been advised not to eat is often a great way to get in essential nutrients. Here is my ‘Tummy Tonic’ juice (don’t eat the garnish!)

Making little tartlets with lower-fibre vegetables can liven up a bland low-fibre diet. Here’s my easy recipe for you. Just look within the recipe for how to adapt the main recipe for your needs.

Make healthy ice cream by popping frozen bananas into a super-blender, along with some vanilla or cinnamon. Here’s an easy recipe to adapt to your needs. Most of you can even keep the tahini or peanut butter!

Share this:

Like this:


Food to glow

•Eat little and often this helps with discomfort. Aim for three small but calorific meals and 2-3 snacks or nourishing drinks (milkshakes, fortified milk) meals a day. OR any permutation of this ideal. Some people find it easiest to eat a little something every two hours rather than think in terms of meals as such. Whatever suits you and keeps you comfortable and nourished is good.

•Choose a variety of foods from the low-fibre list. Grazing from this list will keep things from getting boring and will give a fair spread of nutrients. I am planning an ebook of suitable recipes. But in the meantime please have a look at Easy and Delicious Low-Fibre Recipes.

•If you are advised to follow a restricted diet for more than five days ask your treatment team about multivitamin/mineral supplements. You are at risk of not getting enough of the water-soluble vitamins like Vitamin C (cooking destroys them) if this diet is followed long term.

* Your appetite will probably fluctuate but do try and keep eating regularly. Regular eating helps with appetite and bowel function.

* Capitalise on eating when you are hungry, not when you think you should eat. With that in mind, don’t worry about eating at the ‘wrong times’ or eating meals out of sequence: if you fancy having a bowl of Rice Krispies at 2 a.m., just do it. Have quick snack and easily heated meals available for any time that hunger strikes.

o A serving is roughly 80 grams

Whole grain breads, pasta, grains, rice, noodles and anything made with these herbs (even chopped ones) strong cheeses yogurt with fruit skin or seeds most raw vegetables and fruits tough meat/chunky meat dried fruit and prune juice (check fibre of any juices you buy), olives, all beans, pulses, nuts, seeds and whole grains food with whole coconut/desiccated coconut popcorn horseradish cocoa powder (high in insoluble fibre), highly spiced food and dressings/sauces. You may or may not be allowed chocolate/chocolate syrup: check. Other foods may be allowed/disallowed by your doctor, so do ask.

Fiber Guardian – a US site with 900 foods sorted by type

Fiber Content of Foods (choose foods by clicking on the alphabet selection bar) – comprehensive overview of American products and raw foods

How To Eat A Low Fiber Diet (slightly annoying, but useful, slideshow) – Health.com

 Kellie Anderson 2012 (updated 29 March 2015)

juicing fruits and vegetables you have been advised not to eat is often a great way to get in essential nutrients. Here is my ‘Tummy Tonic’ juice (don’t eat the garnish!)

Making little tartlets with lower-fibre vegetables can liven up a bland low-fibre diet. Here’s my easy recipe for you. Just look within the recipe for how to adapt the main recipe for your needs.

Make healthy ice cream by popping frozen bananas into a super-blender, along with some vanilla or cinnamon. Here’s an easy recipe to adapt to your needs. Most of you can even keep the tahini or peanut butter!

Share this:

Like this:


Food to glow

•Eat little and often this helps with discomfort. Aim for three small but calorific meals and 2-3 snacks or nourishing drinks (milkshakes, fortified milk) meals a day. OR any permutation of this ideal. Some people find it easiest to eat a little something every two hours rather than think in terms of meals as such. Whatever suits you and keeps you comfortable and nourished is good.

•Choose a variety of foods from the low-fibre list. Grazing from this list will keep things from getting boring and will give a fair spread of nutrients. I am planning an ebook of suitable recipes. But in the meantime please have a look at Easy and Delicious Low-Fibre Recipes.

•If you are advised to follow a restricted diet for more than five days ask your treatment team about multivitamin/mineral supplements. You are at risk of not getting enough of the water-soluble vitamins like Vitamin C (cooking destroys them) if this diet is followed long term.

* Your appetite will probably fluctuate but do try and keep eating regularly. Regular eating helps with appetite and bowel function.

* Capitalise on eating when you are hungry, not when you think you should eat. With that in mind, don’t worry about eating at the ‘wrong times’ or eating meals out of sequence: if you fancy having a bowl of Rice Krispies at 2 a.m., just do it. Have quick snack and easily heated meals available for any time that hunger strikes.

o A serving is roughly 80 grams

Whole grain breads, pasta, grains, rice, noodles and anything made with these herbs (even chopped ones) strong cheeses yogurt with fruit skin or seeds most raw vegetables and fruits tough meat/chunky meat dried fruit and prune juice (check fibre of any juices you buy), olives, all beans, pulses, nuts, seeds and whole grains food with whole coconut/desiccated coconut popcorn horseradish cocoa powder (high in insoluble fibre), highly spiced food and dressings/sauces. You may or may not be allowed chocolate/chocolate syrup: check. Other foods may be allowed/disallowed by your doctor, so do ask.

Fiber Guardian – a US site with 900 foods sorted by type

Fiber Content of Foods (choose foods by clicking on the alphabet selection bar) – comprehensive overview of American products and raw foods

How To Eat A Low Fiber Diet (slightly annoying, but useful, slideshow) – Health.com

 Kellie Anderson 2012 (updated 29 March 2015)

juicing fruits and vegetables you have been advised not to eat is often a great way to get in essential nutrients. Here is my ‘Tummy Tonic’ juice (don’t eat the garnish!)

Making little tartlets with lower-fibre vegetables can liven up a bland low-fibre diet. Here’s my easy recipe for you. Just look within the recipe for how to adapt the main recipe for your needs.

Make healthy ice cream by popping frozen bananas into a super-blender, along with some vanilla or cinnamon. Here’s an easy recipe to adapt to your needs. Most of you can even keep the tahini or peanut butter!

Share this:

Like this:


Food to glow

•Eat little and often this helps with discomfort. Aim for three small but calorific meals and 2-3 snacks or nourishing drinks (milkshakes, fortified milk) meals a day. OR any permutation of this ideal. Some people find it easiest to eat a little something every two hours rather than think in terms of meals as such. Whatever suits you and keeps you comfortable and nourished is good.

•Choose a variety of foods from the low-fibre list. Grazing from this list will keep things from getting boring and will give a fair spread of nutrients. I am planning an ebook of suitable recipes. But in the meantime please have a look at Easy and Delicious Low-Fibre Recipes.

•If you are advised to follow a restricted diet for more than five days ask your treatment team about multivitamin/mineral supplements. You are at risk of not getting enough of the water-soluble vitamins like Vitamin C (cooking destroys them) if this diet is followed long term.

* Your appetite will probably fluctuate but do try and keep eating regularly. Regular eating helps with appetite and bowel function.

* Capitalise on eating when you are hungry, not when you think you should eat. With that in mind, don’t worry about eating at the ‘wrong times’ or eating meals out of sequence: if you fancy having a bowl of Rice Krispies at 2 a.m., just do it. Have quick snack and easily heated meals available for any time that hunger strikes.

o A serving is roughly 80 grams

Whole grain breads, pasta, grains, rice, noodles and anything made with these herbs (even chopped ones) strong cheeses yogurt with fruit skin or seeds most raw vegetables and fruits tough meat/chunky meat dried fruit and prune juice (check fibre of any juices you buy), olives, all beans, pulses, nuts, seeds and whole grains food with whole coconut/desiccated coconut popcorn horseradish cocoa powder (high in insoluble fibre), highly spiced food and dressings/sauces. You may or may not be allowed chocolate/chocolate syrup: check. Other foods may be allowed/disallowed by your doctor, so do ask.

Fiber Guardian – a US site with 900 foods sorted by type

Fiber Content of Foods (choose foods by clicking on the alphabet selection bar) – comprehensive overview of American products and raw foods

How To Eat A Low Fiber Diet (slightly annoying, but useful, slideshow) – Health.com

 Kellie Anderson 2012 (updated 29 March 2015)

juicing fruits and vegetables you have been advised not to eat is often a great way to get in essential nutrients. Here is my ‘Tummy Tonic’ juice (don’t eat the garnish!)

Making little tartlets with lower-fibre vegetables can liven up a bland low-fibre diet. Here’s my easy recipe for you. Just look within the recipe for how to adapt the main recipe for your needs.

Make healthy ice cream by popping frozen bananas into a super-blender, along with some vanilla or cinnamon. Here’s an easy recipe to adapt to your needs. Most of you can even keep the tahini or peanut butter!

Share this:

Like this:


Food to glow

•Eat little and often this helps with discomfort. Aim for three small but calorific meals and 2-3 snacks or nourishing drinks (milkshakes, fortified milk) meals a day. OR any permutation of this ideal. Some people find it easiest to eat a little something every two hours rather than think in terms of meals as such. Whatever suits you and keeps you comfortable and nourished is good.

•Choose a variety of foods from the low-fibre list. Grazing from this list will keep things from getting boring and will give a fair spread of nutrients. I am planning an ebook of suitable recipes. But in the meantime please have a look at Easy and Delicious Low-Fibre Recipes.

•If you are advised to follow a restricted diet for more than five days ask your treatment team about multivitamin/mineral supplements. You are at risk of not getting enough of the water-soluble vitamins like Vitamin C (cooking destroys them) if this diet is followed long term.

* Your appetite will probably fluctuate but do try and keep eating regularly. Regular eating helps with appetite and bowel function.

* Capitalise on eating when you are hungry, not when you think you should eat. With that in mind, don’t worry about eating at the ‘wrong times’ or eating meals out of sequence: if you fancy having a bowl of Rice Krispies at 2 a.m., just do it. Have quick snack and easily heated meals available for any time that hunger strikes.

o A serving is roughly 80 grams

Whole grain breads, pasta, grains, rice, noodles and anything made with these herbs (even chopped ones) strong cheeses yogurt with fruit skin or seeds most raw vegetables and fruits tough meat/chunky meat dried fruit and prune juice (check fibre of any juices you buy), olives, all beans, pulses, nuts, seeds and whole grains food with whole coconut/desiccated coconut popcorn horseradish cocoa powder (high in insoluble fibre), highly spiced food and dressings/sauces. You may or may not be allowed chocolate/chocolate syrup: check. Other foods may be allowed/disallowed by your doctor, so do ask.

Fiber Guardian – a US site with 900 foods sorted by type

Fiber Content of Foods (choose foods by clicking on the alphabet selection bar) – comprehensive overview of American products and raw foods

How To Eat A Low Fiber Diet (slightly annoying, but useful, slideshow) – Health.com

 Kellie Anderson 2012 (updated 29 March 2015)

juicing fruits and vegetables you have been advised not to eat is often a great way to get in essential nutrients. Here is my ‘Tummy Tonic’ juice (don’t eat the garnish!)

Making little tartlets with lower-fibre vegetables can liven up a bland low-fibre diet. Here’s my easy recipe for you. Just look within the recipe for how to adapt the main recipe for your needs.

Make healthy ice cream by popping frozen bananas into a super-blender, along with some vanilla or cinnamon. Here’s an easy recipe to adapt to your needs. Most of you can even keep the tahini or peanut butter!

Share this:

Like this:


Food to glow

•Eat little and often this helps with discomfort. Aim for three small but calorific meals and 2-3 snacks or nourishing drinks (milkshakes, fortified milk) meals a day. OR any permutation of this ideal. Some people find it easiest to eat a little something every two hours rather than think in terms of meals as such. Whatever suits you and keeps you comfortable and nourished is good.

•Choose a variety of foods from the low-fibre list. Grazing from this list will keep things from getting boring and will give a fair spread of nutrients. I am planning an ebook of suitable recipes. But in the meantime please have a look at Easy and Delicious Low-Fibre Recipes.

•If you are advised to follow a restricted diet for more than five days ask your treatment team about multivitamin/mineral supplements. You are at risk of not getting enough of the water-soluble vitamins like Vitamin C (cooking destroys them) if this diet is followed long term.

* Your appetite will probably fluctuate but do try and keep eating regularly. Regular eating helps with appetite and bowel function.

* Capitalise on eating when you are hungry, not when you think you should eat. With that in mind, don’t worry about eating at the ‘wrong times’ or eating meals out of sequence: if you fancy having a bowl of Rice Krispies at 2 a.m., just do it. Have quick snack and easily heated meals available for any time that hunger strikes.

o A serving is roughly 80 grams

Whole grain breads, pasta, grains, rice, noodles and anything made with these herbs (even chopped ones) strong cheeses yogurt with fruit skin or seeds most raw vegetables and fruits tough meat/chunky meat dried fruit and prune juice (check fibre of any juices you buy), olives, all beans, pulses, nuts, seeds and whole grains food with whole coconut/desiccated coconut popcorn horseradish cocoa powder (high in insoluble fibre), highly spiced food and dressings/sauces. You may or may not be allowed chocolate/chocolate syrup: check. Other foods may be allowed/disallowed by your doctor, so do ask.

Fiber Guardian – a US site with 900 foods sorted by type

Fiber Content of Foods (choose foods by clicking on the alphabet selection bar) – comprehensive overview of American products and raw foods

How To Eat A Low Fiber Diet (slightly annoying, but useful, slideshow) – Health.com

 Kellie Anderson 2012 (updated 29 March 2015)

juicing fruits and vegetables you have been advised not to eat is often a great way to get in essential nutrients. Here is my ‘Tummy Tonic’ juice (don’t eat the garnish!)

Making little tartlets with lower-fibre vegetables can liven up a bland low-fibre diet. Here’s my easy recipe for you. Just look within the recipe for how to adapt the main recipe for your needs.

Make healthy ice cream by popping frozen bananas into a super-blender, along with some vanilla or cinnamon. Here’s an easy recipe to adapt to your needs. Most of you can even keep the tahini or peanut butter!

Share this:

Like this:


Food to glow

•Eat little and often this helps with discomfort. Aim for three small but calorific meals and 2-3 snacks or nourishing drinks (milkshakes, fortified milk) meals a day. OR any permutation of this ideal. Some people find it easiest to eat a little something every two hours rather than think in terms of meals as such. Whatever suits you and keeps you comfortable and nourished is good.

•Choose a variety of foods from the low-fibre list. Grazing from this list will keep things from getting boring and will give a fair spread of nutrients. I am planning an ebook of suitable recipes. But in the meantime please have a look at Easy and Delicious Low-Fibre Recipes.

•If you are advised to follow a restricted diet for more than five days ask your treatment team about multivitamin/mineral supplements. You are at risk of not getting enough of the water-soluble vitamins like Vitamin C (cooking destroys them) if this diet is followed long term.

* Your appetite will probably fluctuate but do try and keep eating regularly. Regular eating helps with appetite and bowel function.

* Capitalise on eating when you are hungry, not when you think you should eat. With that in mind, don’t worry about eating at the ‘wrong times’ or eating meals out of sequence: if you fancy having a bowl of Rice Krispies at 2 a.m., just do it. Have quick snack and easily heated meals available for any time that hunger strikes.

o A serving is roughly 80 grams

Whole grain breads, pasta, grains, rice, noodles and anything made with these herbs (even chopped ones) strong cheeses yogurt with fruit skin or seeds most raw vegetables and fruits tough meat/chunky meat dried fruit and prune juice (check fibre of any juices you buy), olives, all beans, pulses, nuts, seeds and whole grains food with whole coconut/desiccated coconut popcorn horseradish cocoa powder (high in insoluble fibre), highly spiced food and dressings/sauces. You may or may not be allowed chocolate/chocolate syrup: check. Other foods may be allowed/disallowed by your doctor, so do ask.

Fiber Guardian – a US site with 900 foods sorted by type

Fiber Content of Foods (choose foods by clicking on the alphabet selection bar) – comprehensive overview of American products and raw foods

How To Eat A Low Fiber Diet (slightly annoying, but useful, slideshow) – Health.com

 Kellie Anderson 2012 (updated 29 March 2015)

juicing fruits and vegetables you have been advised not to eat is often a great way to get in essential nutrients. Here is my ‘Tummy Tonic’ juice (don’t eat the garnish!)

Making little tartlets with lower-fibre vegetables can liven up a bland low-fibre diet. Here’s my easy recipe for you. Just look within the recipe for how to adapt the main recipe for your needs.

Make healthy ice cream by popping frozen bananas into a super-blender, along with some vanilla or cinnamon. Here’s an easy recipe to adapt to your needs. Most of you can even keep the tahini or peanut butter!

Share this:

Like this:


Food to glow

•Eat little and often this helps with discomfort. Aim for three small but calorific meals and 2-3 snacks or nourishing drinks (milkshakes, fortified milk) meals a day. OR any permutation of this ideal. Some people find it easiest to eat a little something every two hours rather than think in terms of meals as such. Whatever suits you and keeps you comfortable and nourished is good.

•Choose a variety of foods from the low-fibre list. Grazing from this list will keep things from getting boring and will give a fair spread of nutrients. I am planning an ebook of suitable recipes. But in the meantime please have a look at Easy and Delicious Low-Fibre Recipes.

•If you are advised to follow a restricted diet for more than five days ask your treatment team about multivitamin/mineral supplements. You are at risk of not getting enough of the water-soluble vitamins like Vitamin C (cooking destroys them) if this diet is followed long term.

* Your appetite will probably fluctuate but do try and keep eating regularly. Regular eating helps with appetite and bowel function.

* Capitalise on eating when you are hungry, not when you think you should eat. With that in mind, don’t worry about eating at the ‘wrong times’ or eating meals out of sequence: if you fancy having a bowl of Rice Krispies at 2 a.m., just do it. Have quick snack and easily heated meals available for any time that hunger strikes.

o A serving is roughly 80 grams

Whole grain breads, pasta, grains, rice, noodles and anything made with these herbs (even chopped ones) strong cheeses yogurt with fruit skin or seeds most raw vegetables and fruits tough meat/chunky meat dried fruit and prune juice (check fibre of any juices you buy), olives, all beans, pulses, nuts, seeds and whole grains food with whole coconut/desiccated coconut popcorn horseradish cocoa powder (high in insoluble fibre), highly spiced food and dressings/sauces. You may or may not be allowed chocolate/chocolate syrup: check. Other foods may be allowed/disallowed by your doctor, so do ask.

Fiber Guardian – a US site with 900 foods sorted by type

Fiber Content of Foods (choose foods by clicking on the alphabet selection bar) – comprehensive overview of American products and raw foods

How To Eat A Low Fiber Diet (slightly annoying, but useful, slideshow) – Health.com

 Kellie Anderson 2012 (updated 29 March 2015)

juicing fruits and vegetables you have been advised not to eat is often a great way to get in essential nutrients. Here is my ‘Tummy Tonic’ juice (don’t eat the garnish!)

Making little tartlets with lower-fibre vegetables can liven up a bland low-fibre diet. Here’s my easy recipe for you. Just look within the recipe for how to adapt the main recipe for your needs.

Make healthy ice cream by popping frozen bananas into a super-blender, along with some vanilla or cinnamon. Here’s an easy recipe to adapt to your needs. Most of you can even keep the tahini or peanut butter!

Share this:

Like this:


Food to glow

•Eat little and often this helps with discomfort. Aim for three small but calorific meals and 2-3 snacks or nourishing drinks (milkshakes, fortified milk) meals a day. OR any permutation of this ideal. Some people find it easiest to eat a little something every two hours rather than think in terms of meals as such. Whatever suits you and keeps you comfortable and nourished is good.

•Choose a variety of foods from the low-fibre list. Grazing from this list will keep things from getting boring and will give a fair spread of nutrients. I am planning an ebook of suitable recipes. But in the meantime please have a look at Easy and Delicious Low-Fibre Recipes.

•If you are advised to follow a restricted diet for more than five days ask your treatment team about multivitamin/mineral supplements. You are at risk of not getting enough of the water-soluble vitamins like Vitamin C (cooking destroys them) if this diet is followed long term.

* Your appetite will probably fluctuate but do try and keep eating regularly. Regular eating helps with appetite and bowel function.

* Capitalise on eating when you are hungry, not when you think you should eat. With that in mind, don’t worry about eating at the ‘wrong times’ or eating meals out of sequence: if you fancy having a bowl of Rice Krispies at 2 a.m., just do it. Have quick snack and easily heated meals available for any time that hunger strikes.

o A serving is roughly 80 grams

Whole grain breads, pasta, grains, rice, noodles and anything made with these herbs (even chopped ones) strong cheeses yogurt with fruit skin or seeds most raw vegetables and fruits tough meat/chunky meat dried fruit and prune juice (check fibre of any juices you buy), olives, all beans, pulses, nuts, seeds and whole grains food with whole coconut/desiccated coconut popcorn horseradish cocoa powder (high in insoluble fibre), highly spiced food and dressings/sauces. You may or may not be allowed chocolate/chocolate syrup: check. Other foods may be allowed/disallowed by your doctor, so do ask.

Fiber Guardian – a US site with 900 foods sorted by type

Fiber Content of Foods (choose foods by clicking on the alphabet selection bar) – comprehensive overview of American products and raw foods

How To Eat A Low Fiber Diet (slightly annoying, but useful, slideshow) – Health.com

 Kellie Anderson 2012 (updated 29 March 2015)

juicing fruits and vegetables you have been advised not to eat is often a great way to get in essential nutrients. Here is my ‘Tummy Tonic’ juice (don’t eat the garnish!)

Making little tartlets with lower-fibre vegetables can liven up a bland low-fibre diet. Here’s my easy recipe for you. Just look within the recipe for how to adapt the main recipe for your needs.

Make healthy ice cream by popping frozen bananas into a super-blender, along with some vanilla or cinnamon. Here’s an easy recipe to adapt to your needs. Most of you can even keep the tahini or peanut butter!

Share this:

Like this:


Food to glow

•Eat little and often this helps with discomfort. Aim for three small but calorific meals and 2-3 snacks or nourishing drinks (milkshakes, fortified milk) meals a day. OR any permutation of this ideal. Some people find it easiest to eat a little something every two hours rather than think in terms of meals as such. Whatever suits you and keeps you comfortable and nourished is good.

•Choose a variety of foods from the low-fibre list. Grazing from this list will keep things from getting boring and will give a fair spread of nutrients. I am planning an ebook of suitable recipes. But in the meantime please have a look at Easy and Delicious Low-Fibre Recipes.

•If you are advised to follow a restricted diet for more than five days ask your treatment team about multivitamin/mineral supplements. You are at risk of not getting enough of the water-soluble vitamins like Vitamin C (cooking destroys them) if this diet is followed long term.

* Your appetite will probably fluctuate but do try and keep eating regularly. Regular eating helps with appetite and bowel function.

* Capitalise on eating when you are hungry, not when you think you should eat. With that in mind, don’t worry about eating at the ‘wrong times’ or eating meals out of sequence: if you fancy having a bowl of Rice Krispies at 2 a.m., just do it. Have quick snack and easily heated meals available for any time that hunger strikes.

o A serving is roughly 80 grams

Whole grain breads, pasta, grains, rice, noodles and anything made with these herbs (even chopped ones) strong cheeses yogurt with fruit skin or seeds most raw vegetables and fruits tough meat/chunky meat dried fruit and prune juice (check fibre of any juices you buy), olives, all beans, pulses, nuts, seeds and whole grains food with whole coconut/desiccated coconut popcorn horseradish cocoa powder (high in insoluble fibre), highly spiced food and dressings/sauces. You may or may not be allowed chocolate/chocolate syrup: check. Other foods may be allowed/disallowed by your doctor, so do ask.

Fiber Guardian – a US site with 900 foods sorted by type

Fiber Content of Foods (choose foods by clicking on the alphabet selection bar) – comprehensive overview of American products and raw foods

How To Eat A Low Fiber Diet (slightly annoying, but useful, slideshow) – Health.com

 Kellie Anderson 2012 (updated 29 March 2015)

juicing fruits and vegetables you have been advised not to eat is often a great way to get in essential nutrients. Here is my ‘Tummy Tonic’ juice (don’t eat the garnish!)

Making little tartlets with lower-fibre vegetables can liven up a bland low-fibre diet. Here’s my easy recipe for you. Just look within the recipe for how to adapt the main recipe for your needs.

Make healthy ice cream by popping frozen bananas into a super-blender, along with some vanilla or cinnamon. Here’s an easy recipe to adapt to your needs. Most of you can even keep the tahini or peanut butter!

Share this:

Like this:


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