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Jjambbong (Korean-Chinese Spicy Noodle Soup)

Jjambbong (Korean-Chinese Spicy Noodle Soup)


Jjambbong (Korean-Chinese Spicy Noodle Soup)

This spicy red noodle soup, jjambbong (also spelled jjamppong), is one of the most popular Korean-Chinese dishes, alongside another noodle dish called jajangmyeon (noodles in black bean sauce). Adapted for Korean taste by early Chinese immigrants to Korea, Korean-Chinese cuisine (although called Chinese by Koreans) is a huge part of Korean food culture. Oftentimes, Koreans have a hard time choosing between the two when eating out.

You will find it surprisingly easy to make this popular bowl of noodle soup at home with easy-to-find ingredients. Restaurants use hand-pulled noodles (that are a tad chewy), but for home cooking you can find ready-made fresh noodles at Korean markets. Another option is to simply use spaghetti or linguini noodles. The soup is typically made with chicken stock for a rich flavor, but you can also use anchovy broth for a cleaner, lighter taste. This soup also incorporates pork, chile-infused oil, and various vegetables and seafood. The combination of all the natural ingredients creates a hearty bowl of soup that is packed with robust flavors. The spiciness will surely clear your sinuses!

Notes

*Note: You can also use dried spaghetti or linguini noodles.

**Note: Don’t cut the squid too small since it shrinks a lot while cooking.

Ingredients

  • 12 -14 ounces fresh jajangmyeon or udon noodles*
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable or canola oil
  • One 1-inch piece ginger, julienned
  • 2 scallions, cut into 2-inch lengths
  • 1 tablespoon Korean chile pepper flakes (gochugaru), or to taste
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 3 ounces fatty pork, sliced thinly
  • 1/4 onion, sliced thinly
  • 1/2 carrot, sliced thinly into 2-inch lengths
  • 4 ounces cabbage, cut into 2-inch lengths
  • 1/2 zucchini, sliced thinly into 2-inch lengths
  • 2 dried shiitake mushrooms, soaked and sliced thinly (optional)
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • 4 cups chicken stock, anchovy broth, or water
  • 4 -6 littleneck clams, cleaned
  • 4 -6 mussels, cleaned and debearded
  • 4 -6 shrimp, peeled and deveined
  • 3 ounces cleaned squid, cut into bite-sized pieces**

Servings2

Calories Per Serving1007

Folate equivalent (total)114µg28%

Riboflavin (B2)0.6mg36.1%


Korean Spicy Seafood Noodle Soup, Jjamppong

There are two majorly popular Chinese inspired Korean foods. One is the Jjajangmyun and the other is this Korean spicy seafood noodle soup, Jjamppong (짬뽕). If you go to any Korean-Chinese restaurants, you will find these two items on the menu for sure.

When the weather outside is chilly and dreary, Korean people often order this Korean spicy seafood noodle soup, Jjamppong, from their local restaurant as a delivery. Yes, Korea is a heaven an earth when it comes to the food delivery. Anything can be delivered anywhere, anytime. I miss the convenient life style in Korea, which is hard to find in the country I am currently living in.

This Korean spicy seafood noodle soup, Jjampong, is also easy to replicate at home. Everybody has a different way of making it. So I am adding my version to join the party.

I have to tell you that it is not easy to find fresh seafood in the suburbs of Buenos Aires. I wanted to make this Jjamppong for a long time but couldn’t do it because of the unavailability of ingredients. So when my local seafood seller stocked squid (calamari), shrimp, and mussels the other day, I knew I had to grab some before they sold out. Once they sold out, I might have to wait another few months or a year to see them again.

You can use any of your favorite seafoods for this recipe. I picked squid (calamari), shrimp, and mussels. Use at least 2-3 different types to get a good flavor in the soup. If you don’t like squid, then use scallops instead. If you don’t like seafood at all, then this is obviously not the right recipe for you. But I am telling you, this is one heck of good noodle soup that you shouldn’t miss if you love spicy soup and seafood.

If you want to see how to clean fresh squid, check my stir-fried spicy squid recipe to get an idea. It can be yucky, but fun to try at least once in your lifetime.

Making Jjamppong is not that difficult. It is rather quick to make, too. So let’s get to work.

You will need some vegetables. Green cabbage, zucchini, and onions are recommended for this recipe. You will also need chopped leeks or green onions.

First, saute the leeks (green onion) and garlic in oil until soft.

Some people like to add a little amount of pork in the soup. If you want to do so, stir-fry the pork at this stage. Pork will add another layer of flavor in the soup.

Add the Korean chili flakes. Yes, 3 tablespoons!

It seems like an awfully large amount of chili but this is meant to be intensively red and spicy. Actually you will be surprised that the outcome is not overly spicy like you think. This soup is NOT going to numb your senses. I promise.

Tip: If you want suicidal heat to knock yourself out, add some cayenne pepper. That will bring a plenty of extra heat to the soup. This might help relieve cold symptoms like nasal congestion. It always helped me.

Add the cabbage and onion and continue to saute until they are softened, about 2-3 minutes.

Add the zucchini slices and cook 1 more minute, then add the chicken stock (I recommend to use low sodium). Add the oyster sauce to the soup, mix and bring the whole thing to a boil.

Simmer for a few minutes. When the vegetables are soft and tender, add the seafood. Season with Korean soy sauce for soup. Adjust the seasoning according to your taste. Now, your Korean spicy seafood noodle soup, Jjamppong, is ready to serve.

Prepare wheat noodles according to your package’s directions and place individual servings in bowls. If you can’t find Asian style wheat noodles, use spaghetti instead. That would be fine as well.

Ladle the hot soup over the noodles.

Take a moment to stare at the beauty for 2 seconds first, just to pay respect to the chef. Then start the slurping noodles. Don’t forget the spicy broth. Unless you added the cayenne pepper, it is not overly spicy as you might think. You’re gonna love this, folks! I devoured the entire bowl of soup in less than 5 minutes, I think.


Spicy mixed-up seafood noodle soup

Today I’m introducing you to jjamppong, a spicy noodle soup full of seafood, meat, and vegetables. As you see from the video, it’s made with a lot of different ingredients, which makes it a hearty, filling meal, served spicy steaming hot.

This is a Korean Chinese dish, developed by Chinese immigrants living in Incheon, Korea and adapted to Korean tastes. Jjamppong and jjajangmyeon (noodles with black bean sauce) are common dishes for Korean Chinese delivery. They are usually served in huge portions and both use the same noodles.

The key to this recipe is in the delicious, savory, anchovy and kelp stock. I learned this tip from the owner of a Korean grocery store when I lived in Columbia, Missouri many years ago. His wife was very kind, and one day when I stopped by the store she invited me to go into the back room where her husband was making jjamppong. I had never heard of anyone making jjamppong at home before, everyone orders it from Chinese restaurants. But he showed me how he made his stock, and in what order everything should be cooked, and for how long. He was a real gourmet and his jjamppong was delicious. I’ve used his recipe ever since.

Many years later, when writing the jjamppong recipe in my book Maangchi’s Real Korean Cooking, I wanted to get a few details from him. I hadn’t talked to them for a long time, but looked up their store online and called them. She recognized my voice right away! But she was too busy with customers to talk much, so she asked me to call her in a few hours.

But I forgot to call her and eventually my book was published and life went on. Much later I remembered her and called her again. The number didn’t work anymore. I Googled the store and found her obituary in the local paper, she had passed away! Her husband must have retired, because their son took over the store. I feel sad about not calling her back!

I’m grateful that she invited me to have jjamppong that day, so now I can pass this recipe along to all of you. It’s a little modified from the one in my cookbook because I simplified a few things, but it’s still delicious! I hope you enjoy it!

Ingredients

  • 1 ounce of large dried anchovies (about 24 anchovies) with the heads and guts removed
  • 1 piece (about 6࡬ inch) dried kelp
  • 12 cups water
  • 1 daepa (large green onion), or 4 green onions, cut into 2 inch length
  • 2 ounces leek, washed and cut into ½ x 2 inch strips
  • 4 ounces bok choy, washed
  • 3 large cabbage leaves (about 3 ounces), cut into bite-size pieces
  • 4 ounces onion, sliced
  • 1 small carrot, peeled and cut into 2-inch strips

Seafoods and meat:

  • 8 mussels, scrubbed, debearded, soaked in salted water for a few hours, and washed
  • 4 large shrimp, shelled and deveined
  • 4 ounces squid, just the body with guts removed and sliced into rings
  • 24 small clams (optional), soaked in salted water for a few hours, and washed
  • 4 ounces of thinly sliced beef (or pork or chicken), cut into bite-size pieces

Noodles and seasonings:

  • 2 bunches (1 pound) fresh or frozen jjajangmyeon noodles, thawed if frozen, and uncoiled
  • 5 tablespoons gochugaru (Korean hot pepper flakes)
  • 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 1 teaspoon minced ginger
  • ¼ cup vegetable oil
  • 1 tablespoon fish sauce
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt

Directions:

  1. Combine the water, anchovies, and kelp in a large pot. Cover, and cook over medium-high heat for 20 minutes.
  2. Reduce the heat to low and cook for another 20 minutes.
  3. Strain the stock and you will have 8 to 10 cups’ worth. Set aside.

Make the hot pepper flakes mixture:

  1. Combine 2 tablespoons of hot pepper flakes and 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil in a small bowl.
  2. Mix with a spoon until well incorporated. Set aside.

Make jjamppong:

  1. Heat a large wok (or pot) over high heat. Add the vegetable oil, garlic, ginger, and stir about 20 seconds with a wooden spoon until the garlic starts to turn a little crispy.
  2. Add the beef and stir until slightly cooked.
  3. Clear a spot in the wok by pushing the garlic, ginger, and the meat to the side. Tilt the wok so that the excess vegetable oil slides into the cleared area. Put 3 tablespoons hot pepper flakes into the hot oil and stir and mix with the wooden spoon for about 1 minute, until it creates a smoky flavor but not long enough to burn. Then stir everything in the wok together into the hot oil.
  4. Add green onion, leek, cabbage, and onion and stir for 3 to 4 minutes until the vegetables are wilted.
  5. Add 6 cups stock and all the seafoods and bok choy. Cover and cook 7 to 8 minutes until the mussels and clams are open and the shrimp and squid are well cooked.
  6. Stir in the fish sauce, kosher salt, and the reserved hot pepper flakes mixture. Cover and let it simmer over low heat.

Meanwhile, cook the noodles:

  1. Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add the noodles and stir a few times so that they don’t stick to each other.
  2. Cover and cook 5 to 8 minutes until tender but still chewy.
  3. Strain and rinse the noodles in cold running water to make them nice and chewy.

Put it together and serve:

  1. Heat up the soup over high heat.
  2. Divide the noodles into individual serving bowls. Add the soup over top and include cooked seafood, vegetables, meat over top of the noodles. Serve right away.

Jjambbong (Korean Spicy Seafood Noodles)

Jjambbong is a hybrid noodle dish having roots in Chinese cuisine and being adapted from Korean cuisine. Originally from North-East China, this noodle dish arrived in Korea with the arrival of Chinese immigrants since the 1800s, mostly from Shandong. It was then adapted to suit Korean palates, and to use Korean ingredients as a substitute to Chinese ones.

Jjambbong was initially a noodle soup served in a white broth that contained no chilies. However, since the 1960s, it has become accepted and the norm that Jjambbong contains chilli flakes, thus creating the spicy noodle soup dish that Jjambbong is widely associated with today. Do note that Korean fish sauce is not easy to find in most markets and supermarkets, even in Asian countries outside South Korea. The best substitute is Thai fish sauce, which gives the Jjambbong a subtle and yet saline umami hit which adds a delectable touch to the overall experience and enjoyment of this Korean-Chinese hybrid noodle soup.

Recently, I’ve been using these pre-cooked mussels and clams which are really convenient and the taste is as good as fresh.

This delectable and rustic noodle dish is best enjoyed on rainy and windy days, as it does give one’s body a slight kick and innate sense of heat. It is easy to prepare, tasty and most importantly, comforting.

Ingredients:
500 g mussels (I’m using pre-cooked)
500 g clams (I’m using pre-cooked)
250 g prawns – head and gut removed
50 g sliced pork belly / any other meat (optional)
3 cloves of garlic – minced
1 small knob of ginger – minced
2 stalk spring onions – chopped
½ white onion – sliced thinly
½ piece carrot – julienned
3 cabbage leaves – sliced thinly
1 handful baby bak choy
2 pieces dried wood ear fungus – soaked in water till soften and chopped
1 litre low sodium chicken stock
1 tsp fish sauce + 2 tsp sugar
3 tbsp Korean red pepper powder (Gochugaru)
1 tsp sesame oil
450g Korean Chinese style noodles (udon or ramen is fine too)

I’m using pre-cooked mussels and clams.

Prepare all the above ingredients and set aside.

Cook the noodles according to the package instructions. Drain and set aside.

If you are using pork belly or any other types of meat, mix in 1 tsp sesame oil and 1 tbsp Korean red pepper powder. Alternative you can skip this step.

In a large deep pot or pan, heat 2 tbsp cooking oil and sauté the sliced pork belly (if using) over high heat. Push meat to one side.

Add in garlic, ginger and remaining red pepper powder and sauté until fragrant be careful not to burn the garlic and red pepper powder.

Be careful not to burn the red pepper powder and garlic.

Add in remaining vegetables, except baby bak choy, and mix well. Season with a pinch of salt and pepper.

Add in chicken stock and bring to boil. Drizzle in fish sauce, sugar and taste. Adjust with more seasoning if necessary.

*You can prepare the stock ahead and add in seafood when you are ready to serve.

Add in all the seafood, baby bak choy to the stock and cover with lid. Once the shells of the clams and mussels are opened, turn off heat. Do not overcook the seafood to avoid chewy texture.

Place desired amount of noodles in a large bowl and ladle a good amount of ingredients and soup.


Jjambbong (spicy noodle soup)

This spicy noodle soup, “jambbong,” is one of the most popular Korean-Chinese dishes alongside “jjajangmyeon” (noodles in a black bean sauce). Adapted for Korean tastes by early Chinese immigrants in Korea, Korean-Chinese cuisine (although called Chinese by Koreans) is a huge part of Korean food culture.

You will find it surprisingly easy to make this popular bowl of noodle soup at home with easy-to-find ingredients. Restaurants usually use hand-pulled noodles, but for home cooking you can use ready-made fresh noodles sold in the refrigerator section of the store. The soup is typically made with chicken stock for a rich flavor, but you can also use anchovy broth for a cleaner/lighter taste. This soup also incorporates pork, chili-infused oil, and various vegetables and seafood. The combination of all the natural ingredients creates a hearty bowl of soup that is packed with robust flavors.

Ingredients: (2 servings)

● 400 grams fresh jjajangmyeon/udon noodles

● 1 thumb-size ginger piece, julienned

● 2 scallions, roughly chopped

● 1 tablespoon gochugaru (Korean chili pepper flakes) (adjust to taste)

● 1 tablespoon vegetable or canola oil

● 100 grams fatty pork, thinly sliced

● 1/2 carrot, thinly sliced into bite sizes

● 1/2 zucchini, thinly sliced into bite sizes

●120 grams cabbage, cut into bite sizes

● 2 dried shiitake mushrooms, soaked and thinly sliced

or anchovy broth (or water)

● 80 grams squid, cut into small sizes

Have a pot of water ready to cook the noodles. (Turn the heat on when you start cooking the soup ingredients. This way you can time it so that the noodles can be finished cooking at the same time the soup is ready.) While making the soup, cook the noodles according to the package instructions and drain.

Prepare all of the ingredients before you begin cooking.

Heat a wok or a large pot over high heat. Add the oil, ginger, scallion, gochugaru and soy sauce, and stir fry for a minute.

Add the pork, and stir fry until the pork is almost cooked, about 2 minutes.

Stir in the onion, carrot, cabbage, zucchini and mushrooms, lightly salt, and cook until the vegetables are slightly softened, about 2 minutes. Stir occasionally.

Pour in the chicken stock (or anchovy broth/water), and boil until the vegetables are completely cooked.

Add the seafood starting with the clams, which require more time to cook, followed by the mussels, shrimp and squid. Bring everything to a boil again, and cook until the shells have opened. Add salt and pepper to taste.

Place a serving of the noodles in a large soup bowl and ladle the soup on top. Serve immediately while piping hot.


Spicy mixed-up seafood noodle soup

Today I’m introducing you to jjamppong, a spicy noodle soup full of seafood, meat, and vegetables. As you see from the video, it’s made with a lot of different ingredients, which makes it a hearty, filling meal, served spicy steaming hot.

This is a Korean Chinese dish, developed by Chinese immigrants living in Incheon, Korea and adapted to Korean tastes. Jjamppong and jjajangmyeon (noodles with black bean sauce) are common dishes for Korean Chinese delivery. They are usually served in huge portions and both use the same noodles.

The key to this recipe is in the delicious, savory, anchovy and kelp stock. I learned this tip from the owner of a Korean grocery store when I lived in Columbia, Missouri many years ago. His wife was very kind, and one day when I stopped by the store she invited me to go into the back room where her husband was making jjamppong. I had never heard of anyone making jjamppong at home before, everyone orders it from Chinese restaurants. But he showed me how he made his stock, and in what order everything should be cooked, and for how long. He was a real gourmet and his jjamppong was delicious. I’ve used his recipe ever since.

Many years later, when writing the jjamppong recipe in my book Maangchi’s Real Korean Cooking, I wanted to get a few details from him. I hadn’t talked to them for a long time, but looked up their store online and called them. She recognized my voice right away! But she was too busy with customers to talk much, so she asked me to call her in a few hours.

But I forgot to call her and eventually my book was published and life went on. Much later I remembered her and called her again. The number didn’t work anymore. I Googled the store and found her obituary in the local paper, she had passed away! Her husband must have retired, because their son took over the store. I feel sad about not calling her back!

I’m grateful that she invited me to have jjamppong that day, so now I can pass this recipe along to all of you. It’s a little modified from the one in my cookbook because I simplified a few things, but it’s still delicious! I hope you enjoy it!

Ingredients

  • 1 ounce of large dried anchovies (about 24 anchovies) with the heads and guts removed
  • 1 piece (about 6࡬ inch) dried kelp
  • 12 cups water
  • 1 daepa (large green onion), or 4 green onions, cut into 2 inch length
  • 2 ounces leek, washed and cut into ½ x 2 inch strips
  • 4 ounces bok choy, washed
  • 3 large cabbage leaves (about 3 ounces), cut into bite-size pieces
  • 4 ounces onion, sliced
  • 1 small carrot, peeled and cut into 2-inch strips

Seafoods and meat:

  • 8 mussels, scrubbed, debearded, soaked in salted water for a few hours, and washed
  • 4 large shrimp, shelled and deveined
  • 4 ounces squid, just the body with guts removed and sliced into rings
  • 24 small clams (optional), soaked in salted water for a few hours, and washed
  • 4 ounces of thinly sliced beef (or pork or chicken), cut into bite-size pieces

Noodles and seasonings:

  • 2 bunches (1 pound) fresh or frozen jjajangmyeon noodles, thawed if frozen, and uncoiled
  • 5 tablespoons gochugaru (Korean hot pepper flakes)
  • 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 1 teaspoon minced ginger
  • ¼ cup vegetable oil
  • 1 tablespoon fish sauce
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt

Directions:

  1. Combine the water, anchovies, and kelp in a large pot. Cover, and cook over medium-high heat for 20 minutes.
  2. Reduce the heat to low and cook for another 20 minutes.
  3. Strain the stock and you will have 8 to 10 cups’ worth. Set aside.

Make the hot pepper flakes mixture:

  1. Combine 2 tablespoons of hot pepper flakes and 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil in a small bowl.
  2. Mix with a spoon until well incorporated. Set aside.

Make jjamppong:

  1. Heat a large wok (or pot) over high heat. Add the vegetable oil, garlic, ginger, and stir about 20 seconds with a wooden spoon until the garlic starts to turn a little crispy.
  2. Add the beef and stir until slightly cooked.
  3. Clear a spot in the wok by pushing the garlic, ginger, and the meat to the side. Tilt the wok so that the excess vegetable oil slides into the cleared area. Put 3 tablespoons hot pepper flakes into the hot oil and stir and mix with the wooden spoon for about 1 minute, until it creates a smoky flavor but not long enough to burn. Then stir everything in the wok together into the hot oil.
  4. Add green onion, leek, cabbage, and onion and stir for 3 to 4 minutes until the vegetables are wilted.
  5. Add 6 cups stock and all the seafoods and bok choy. Cover and cook 7 to 8 minutes until the mussels and clams are open and the shrimp and squid are well cooked.
  6. Stir in the fish sauce, kosher salt, and the reserved hot pepper flakes mixture. Cover and let it simmer over low heat.

Meanwhile, cook the noodles:

  1. Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add the noodles and stir a few times so that they don’t stick to each other.
  2. Cover and cook 5 to 8 minutes until tender but still chewy.
  3. Strain and rinse the noodles in cold running water to make them nice and chewy.

Put it together and serve:

  1. Heat up the soup over high heat.
  2. Divide the noodles into individual serving bowls. Add the soup over top and include cooked seafood, vegetables, meat over top of the noodles. Serve right away.

Spicy noodle soup recipe vegetarian

&"It’s a rustic alongside Thailand,&" I attempt to narrow the location lower.

The response this time around is really a nod of general understanding.

However I'm guessing one step further, &"Really, I’m Malaysian-Chinese.&"

Another nod, however this time the attention contact is by using the ground. I’ve lost them.


My ancestors come from China. Together with countless other Chinese, my ancestors were a part of a wave of emigration to British Malaya within the late 1800s and early twentieth century.

Chinese emigration wasn't restricted to Malaysia and not simply for this period of time. Within the centuries, many nations in East and Southeast Asia for example Korea, Vietnam, Thailand, Philippines, Cambodia, Indonesia, and so forth experienced trade and emigration from China, with it, significant cultural influences.

This fusion of cultures are visible in many Parts of asia, but it's best experienced through taste. Something you have surely experienced already for those who have eaten in a Thai or Vietnamese or Korean restaurant the following in america. Or perhaps transported on should you stir-fry Asian dishes in your own home.

Stir-frying is really a Chinese cooking technique that spread all through Asia. When Chinese immigrants moved in, they found new flavors and ingredients to throw in to the wok and stir-fry. A number of these early experiments led to the legendary dishes we currently affiliate with this favorite Asian cuisines like Thailand’s Pad Thai. Malaysia’s Char Koay Teow, and Korea’s Jjambbong.

Jjambbong. or jjamppong. is really a hot sea food noodle soup in Korea. It’s a vintage illustration of the marrying of Chinese putting them to use with Korean flavors.

The noodle soup typically features sea food for example shrimp, clams, calamari, and mussels, together with loads of mixed vegetables. These abundant ingredients are enriched having a soup broth made from chicken, pork ribs, shrimp or anchovy. But to begin, the components are first stir-fried inside a wok, flavored with aromatic garlic clove, ginger root, scallion, soy sauce, and also the distinctively vibrant Korean Chili Flakes (Gochugaru ) .

Due to the quantity of demands we receive for vegetarian recipes as well as for easy recipes for incorporating more veggies to your diet, I’m discussing my form of this Korean-Chinese Spicy Noodle Soup without sea food or perhaps a meaty broth. You won’t even miss the meaty flavor whenever you produce the soup broth using the mixture of our Korean chili flakes and vegetable or mushroom broth. The end result is really a spicy, wealthy, creamy broth that you could make very quickly.

Steamy hot soup, soft noodles, and freshly cooked crisp vegetables, flavored using the spicy, fruity, robust Korean chili pepper - this Korean-Chinese Veggie Noodle Soup warms you up, especially in this historic cold we’ve been battling through earlier this week.

Korean-Chinese Spicy Veggie Noodle Soup (Vegetarian form of Jambbong)
by Season with Spice
Serves 2

Ingredients:
2 areas of fresh or dried udon noodles, or ramen noodles
2 glasses of vegetable broth or mushroom broth
1 1/2 cup water
1 tablespoons of of vegetable oil 3-4 cloves of garlic clove smashed or minced
1 thumb-sized bit of fresh ginger root julienned
2-3 scallions reduce 2 inch lengths (keep some for garnish)
1 tablespoons of of Season with Spice’s Korean Chili Flakes (Gochugaru)
1 tablespoons of of reduced sodium soy sauce
1 tablespoons of of grain vinegar
Salt, to season

Vegetables (make use of all or perhaps a variation):
Half a little yellow onion thinly sliced
1 carrot thinly sliced
1/2 zucchini thinly sliced
3-4 leaves of napa cabbage or bok choy chopped
1/4 cup of sweet corn kernels
A little number of sugar snap peas or snow peas
2-3 fresh or dried shiitake mushrooms - thinly sliced

Quick note:
Before beginning cooking, you need to cut and make preparations all of the ingredients first, so that they are prepared and within achieve.

Method:
1. Inside a soup pot, bring water to some boil and prepare the noodles based on package instructions. Drain well and rinse the noodles over cold water. Place half the noodles in every serving bowl, and hang aside.
2. Utilizing the same pot, combine vegetable/mushroom broth and water and produce to some boil. Lower heat, and it in a simmer.
3. As the broth is simmering, heat a wok or perhaps a large fry pan over high temperature. Once wok is hot, add some oil and swirl to coat. Add garlic clove and stir for any couple of seconds. Adding in ginger root and also the white-colored area of the scallions. Prepare over medium-low heat for any couple of more seconds to infuse the oil.
4. Turn heat look out onto high, and stir out of all vegetables (such as the eco-friendly areas of the scallions), adopted through the Korean chili flakes . soy sauce, and grain vinegar. Prepare before the vegetables are slightly softened, a couple of-3 minutes. Switch off heat. Pour the prepared vegetable/mushroom broth in to the wok to combine using the vegetables. Gently season with salt and produce something to a boil again. Taste and adjust seasoning.
5. Ladle the new soup vegetables within the noodles. Serve immediately. Garnish with leftover scallions.


SPICY KOREAN SEAFOOD SOUP NOODLES INGREDIENTS

Here&rsquos what you&rsquoll need to make this Spicy Korean Seafood Soup Noodles:

  • Aromatics: You&rsquoll need the holy trinity of Chinese cuisine &ndash garlic, ginger, and spring onion. You&rsquoll also need some fresh red or green chilies. But you can also use a jalapeño or two instead if you like.
  • Veggies: I used thinly sliced yellow onion, Asian black mushrooms (Shitake), and Korean cabbage (also known as Napa or Chinese cabbage) in this soup. But if you don&rsquot want to use cabbage, you can swap for bok choy and/or add carrots and zucchini slices if you like.
  • Meat: I used some pork belly that resembles a thick-cut slabs of bacon, and I sliced it thinly. But feel free to use other cuts of pork, pork collar or tenderloin.
  • Seafood: A combination of jumbo black tiger prawns, squid, littleneck clams, and mussels. You&rsquoll need 6-8 pieces of prawns, clams, and mussels, as well as 3.5 ounces/100 grams of squid. Be sure not to slice the squid into too small pieces &ndash they will shrink a lot during cooking.
  • Kimchi: My favorite brand of store-bought kimchi is Jinmi&rsquos Hot Cabbage Kimchi. It&rsquos spicy, and loaded with flavor and umami! If you can&rsquot find this particular brand, any type of kimchi will do. I recommend chopping the kimchi because some cabbage/radish pieces can be quite large. I normally spoon the kimchi into a measuring cup and cut it with cooking scissors.
  • Gochugaru (Korean Chili Pepper Flakes/Powder): Gochugaru can be hot if you use it in large quantities, so adjust the amount according to taste. I recommend 1-2 tablespoons for those who like mild to moderately spicy food, and 3 tablespoons for the die-hard spicy food lovers out there!
  • Gochujang (Korean Chili Pepper Paste): Despite its deep dark shade of red, gochujang is not immensely hot. It&rsquos actually a spicy-sweetish smoky tasting paste that&rsquos more flavorful than spicy. I recommend using 2-3 tablespoons for this soup.
  • Low Sodium Light Soy Sauce: Just two tablespoons will do the trick.
  • Seasonings: Some kosher salt and freshly cracked black pepper. I use a teaspoon of salt, and half a teaspoon of black pepper. But feel free to add as little or as much as you like.
  • Broth: I used pork bone broth, but you can also use low sodium chicken broth, anchovy broth, or even beef broth if you like.
  • Oils: I cook this soup in sesame oil for extra fragrance and flavor, as well as chili oil for more heat. However, I&rsquove listed the chili oil as optional, and you are most welcome to omit it if you don&rsquot want the soup to be too spicy.
  • Noodles: You&rsquoll need some Korean Chopped Wheat Noodles, which can be found in the fridge section in well-stocked supermarkets in Asia. You can also find them at Korean or Asian grocery stores if there&rsquos one near you and if you&rsquore based outside of Asia.

#2391: Ottogi Jin Jjambbong Spicy Seafood Noodle

It’s definitely been a while since I reviewed anything by Ottogi that’s for theSouth Korean market. Actually, this one is an export version, but the more recent ones have been for Mexico and so this is more of a South Korean variety. So, what is jjambbong? Wikipedia has this to say about it:

Jjamppong is a Korean spicy noodle soup flavoured with seafood and gochugaru (red pepper powder). [1] A form of jjamppong is also the local Chinese speciality in the Japanese port city of Nagasaki (see Champon). The noodles are made from wheat flour. [2]

It kind of surprises me to see that this is all wikipedia has to say about it. Notice that in the quote it is spelled jjamppong. When Korean characters are translated to western languages, there’s a lot of different ways it seems that they end up spelled. Another one is Champong. So let’s open this pack up and check out Ottogi Jin Jjambbong!

Ottogi Jin jjambbong Spicy Seafood Noodle – South Korea

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Contains seafood. To prepare, add flake sachet to 550ml water and bring to a boil. Add in noodle block and large liquid sachet and cook 5 minutes. Add in oil. Finally, stir and enjoy!

The noodle block. As has been the trend lately, you can see the noodles are extra wide.

A thick, spicy scented sauce.

The vegetable flake sachet.

Looks like decent sized bits.

A deep orange colored oil.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, narutomaki, carved squid, shrimp, spring onion and sweet onion. The noodles are wide and thick – the popular way these days in premium instant ramyun. The broth was just fantastic. It had a kind of grilled seafood flavor to it and a nice bump of spiciness from the oil. What’s more, it was tasty and savory. The included garnish was just a home run. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 8801045522555.


Here’s an Ottogi Jin Ramen TV commercial. So I did an interview a few years back for local TV. There was a commercial by another South Korean noodle company where the guy slurps the soup loudly and says ‘aahhh’ pretty loud. During the interview, I did this a lot and think I looked pretty silly. This one totally jumps the shark with the post-slurp grunting!

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Spicy Korean Fish Soup (Maeuntang) Recipe

When contemplating what way I should prepare seafood my mind always leaps to memories of Korean food—bubbling jjigae impossible to consume without tearing up, spicy sauted squid eaten over rice for breakfast, fish cakes sold by teasing street vendors, and exquisitely fresh octopus still wriggling and clinging to my throat while I swallow. However, in the Midwest it is nearly impossible to find anything but a pale imitation of the delicious Korean food I fell in love with in Seoul, unless you prepare it yourself that is or are fortunate enough to know an indulgent ahjumma. So in a fit of nostalgia—and the demands of a deprived palate—I decided to tackle making maeuntang (spicy fish stew) over the weekend.

One of my favorite aspects of Korean cooking is plethora of vegetables found in the dishes, as well as the predilection for incorporating meat or seafood cuts often ignored in American cuisine. The use of bones and the fish head in this soup infuse the soup with oodles of nutrients and a delicious flavor. Another appealing trait of many Korean dishes is how simple and swift the dish prep and cooking time often are despite extensive ingredient lists, making them ideal for pulling together swiftly after long work days. All the ingredients for this dish should be easy to locate at a local Asian grocery.

Prep Time: 20 minutes. Cooking Time: 30 minutes.

  • 1 whole fish (cod or snapper is preferable)
  • 1 1/2 cups Korean radish (daikon can also be used)
  • 1 block firm tofu
  • 1 bunch of edible chrysanthemum leaves (ssukgat or shungiku)
  • 1 bunch green onions
  • 1-2 handfuls of bean sprouts
  • 2 tbsp gochujang
  • 1 tsp red pepper flakes
  • 4 shiitake mushrooms
  • 1 small bunch enoki mushrooms
  • 2 tbsp fish sauce
  • 2 tbsp soju or cooking wine
  • 6 cloves garlic
  • 1 tsp ginger root
  • 6-8 cups water
  • 1 sheet of kelp (optional)

Using really fresh fish is key to this dish, maeuntang is actually often prepared in Korea alongside sashimi orders—creating another dish out of the fish pieces left over from sashimi preparation. If fresh whole fish are not easily attainable where you live then fish fillets can be easily substituted. However, a whole fish is preferable since the head and bones give the soup’s broth its wonderful taste.

Ascertaining the freshness of prospective fish at your local fishmonger or market can seem slightly daunting, but there are a handful of easily recognizable indicators. Firstly, check the gills, they should be a deep red colour, if they have already changed to a dull rusty shade then the fish is spoiled. Another clear sign of freshness is bright clear eyes—older fish tend to have cloudy eyes. Also look for firm resilient flesh and a distinct lack of a fishy reek.

Scale the fish (if necessary), wash it thoroughly in cold water, and remove the fins—kitchen shears are ideal for this task. Then cut it into several large chunks, reserving the head.

Scrub the radish and slice it thinly. Cut the ends off of the enoki mushrooms and then separate them. Gently wipe off any dirt on the shiitake mushrooms with damp paper towel and then thickly slice them.

Wash the chrysanthemum leaves and trim them into 6-7 inch long pieces, discarding the thicker portions of the central stalk. Rinse the bean sprouts and pat them dry. Peel the garlic cloves and ginger and chop them finely. Wash the green onions and slice them into ½ inch segments.

First prepare the stock by adding the radish slices, shiitake mushrooms, and kelp to the water and then simmering for 15-20 minutes. Note: if you aren’t keen on the idea of serving a finished dish with a fish head floating in it now is also a good time to add in the fish head. After 15-20 minutes discard the kelp (and fish head if added earlier) and skim off the broth.

Add the gochujjang, pepper flakes, fish sauce, soy sauce, garlic, ginger, and fish to the pot and bring to a boil. Simmer until the fish is completely cooked, 15 minutes or so. Then add the green onions, bean sprouts, tofu, and chrysanthemum leaves and cook for 2-3 minutes longer till the tofu is warmed and the vegetables are lightly cooked. Serve it alongside hot rice.

A delightful bonus to Korean soups is that in addition to providing a vibrant, healthy combination of vegetables and protein, they also keep quite well and reheat easily. So I love making them on the weekend and indulging in the leftovers throughout the week. You can also vary the components of maeuntang extensively to suit your preferences or whatever fresh produce you might have on hand that week. Common additions to the soup tend to be zucchini, fresh chilis, clams, shrimp, and water dropwart.


Watch the video: Spicy seafood and meat mixed noodle soup Jjamppong: 짬뽕