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Exotic Meats Dinner Nixes Lion Meat

Exotic Meats Dinner Nixes Lion Meat


Looks like foie gras isn't the only meat that's getting animal activists all riled up; a Kansas restaurant got some heat last week for planning an exotic meats dinner this week, including a lion meat course.

Chef Jason Febres at Taste & See in Wichita, Kan., was reportedly planning on serving lion meat at a $160 a plate dinner on Tuesday.

He has since substituted the course, the Taste & See general manager tells us. "Our decision to remove the lion meat course was based on a small minority group of people who spoke to us with empathy and understood what we were doing," a representative said. The sold-out dinner will still include eight courses with meats like kangaroo, alpaca, crocodile, foie gras, and water buffalo.

"We did [take] a second look at the fact of serving lion meat and realized that yes, it can be a little shocking and disturbing for some people... [I] didn't mean to offend anybody so I decided to make it right and substitute the lion course," Febres wrote on his Facebook wall.

In the meantime, other animal activists such as the group Born Free protested the dinner, and a Change.org petition was created, saying, "[Febres] is cooking bits and pieces of African lion and other species usually spared from North American dinner plates (alpaca, antelope, crocodile, hare, kangaroo, and water buffalo)." Even though the chef was actaully planning on using farm-raised lion (rather than potentially endangered African lion), animal activists still find eating these meats "absolutely nauseating."

"We believe that wild animals belong in the wild, and there should be no slaughter for human consumption, especially in the U.S.," Adam Roberts, executive vice president of Born Free, said.

Taste & See has yet to decide what the lion substitution will be (menu details are being kept under wraps for their paying guests). "We're contemplating anything from a base meat, like lamb or something a little more common, to a vegan dish to another meat," a representative told us. Meanwhile, the Change.org petition has been updated, claiming that exotic animals should not be served for dinner. Febres, however, thinks otherwise.

"Remember what for 'you' might be exotic or different, for others and some cultures is their daily bread. Take a look for example at the fact that some people love eating cattle... last time I checked it is sacred for some cultures and countries," Febres wrote on his Facebook.

(Photo Modified: Flickr/LesterLeszczynski)


Lions and Tigers and Bears &ndash Oh, Yum!

It's not quite as prevalent today, though it is possible to find at specialty markets, so Shaw had to turn to a friend who had bagged a big one. With the meat he appropriately chose to make pelmeni, a Russian meat-filled dumpling that was traditionally frozen in the snow and eaten during bear-hunting trips. The dumplings were a success.

So why, if it is perfectly tasty ("damn good bear," as described by Shaw), is bear meat such an oddity to us? Shaw hypothesizes that (besides bear meat's rarity) it could be because bears, like us, are omnivores. It is also one of the only beasts on earth that is a threat to us.

In the spirit of Shaw's conquest, here are some other threatening animals and how best to prepare them should the occasion arise:

Python - You don't need to go deep into any jungles to find pythons. Florida houses many of the great snakes due in part to the breeding of escaped pets. The meat on this reptile is quite tough to tame. In order to tenderize it, the lean meat needs to be marinated for at least a day. Chowhound commentors suggest trying a mixture of soy and citrus. Then slow-cooking the meat over the course of a few hours, basting occasionally. Another option would be to make it into a sausage and thereby funneling it back into a form similar to its original.

Shark - The monster of the deep with bone-splitting jaws and rows of flesh-piercing teeth doesn't need "a bigger boat." In fact, according to Larousse Gastronomique it just needs to be bathed in a light brine (to neutralize the slight ammonia odor the big fish can often have) and then marinated several hours in citrus juice, garlic, salt and pepper. Grill the steaks or pan-roast them to the point of medium-well.

Alligators and Crocodiles - Down South and in Africa chefs aren't strangers to gators and crocs. The tail is full of meat that starts out quite tough but after simmering in a gumbo or jambalaya tastes like something in between chicken and fish. It is also good when ground up, made into patties and fried like a fish burger.

Lion - While we in no way condone the killing of the King of the Jungle, there are times when lion meat is available. Sometimes a male will become dangerous to the pack or people and there will be a need to put the lion to sleep. Rather than waste the meat of the great beast, the suggested method of preparation is to treat the steaks like, well, steak and, according to Commander's Wild Side, chicken-fry it and serve it up with gravy.


Lions and Tigers and Bears &ndash Oh, Yum!

It's not quite as prevalent today, though it is possible to find at specialty markets, so Shaw had to turn to a friend who had bagged a big one. With the meat he appropriately chose to make pelmeni, a Russian meat-filled dumpling that was traditionally frozen in the snow and eaten during bear-hunting trips. The dumplings were a success.

So why, if it is perfectly tasty ("damn good bear," as described by Shaw), is bear meat such an oddity to us? Shaw hypothesizes that (besides bear meat's rarity) it could be because bears, like us, are omnivores. It is also one of the only beasts on earth that is a threat to us.

In the spirit of Shaw's conquest, here are some other threatening animals and how best to prepare them should the occasion arise:

Python - You don't need to go deep into any jungles to find pythons. Florida houses many of the great snakes due in part to the breeding of escaped pets. The meat on this reptile is quite tough to tame. In order to tenderize it, the lean meat needs to be marinated for at least a day. Chowhound commentors suggest trying a mixture of soy and citrus. Then slow-cooking the meat over the course of a few hours, basting occasionally. Another option would be to make it into a sausage and thereby funneling it back into a form similar to its original.

Shark - The monster of the deep with bone-splitting jaws and rows of flesh-piercing teeth doesn't need "a bigger boat." In fact, according to Larousse Gastronomique it just needs to be bathed in a light brine (to neutralize the slight ammonia odor the big fish can often have) and then marinated several hours in citrus juice, garlic, salt and pepper. Grill the steaks or pan-roast them to the point of medium-well.

Alligators and Crocodiles - Down South and in Africa chefs aren't strangers to gators and crocs. The tail is full of meat that starts out quite tough but after simmering in a gumbo or jambalaya tastes like something in between chicken and fish. It is also good when ground up, made into patties and fried like a fish burger.

Lion - While we in no way condone the killing of the King of the Jungle, there are times when lion meat is available. Sometimes a male will become dangerous to the pack or people and there will be a need to put the lion to sleep. Rather than waste the meat of the great beast, the suggested method of preparation is to treat the steaks like, well, steak and, according to Commander's Wild Side, chicken-fry it and serve it up with gravy.


Lions and Tigers and Bears &ndash Oh, Yum!

It's not quite as prevalent today, though it is possible to find at specialty markets, so Shaw had to turn to a friend who had bagged a big one. With the meat he appropriately chose to make pelmeni, a Russian meat-filled dumpling that was traditionally frozen in the snow and eaten during bear-hunting trips. The dumplings were a success.

So why, if it is perfectly tasty ("damn good bear," as described by Shaw), is bear meat such an oddity to us? Shaw hypothesizes that (besides bear meat's rarity) it could be because bears, like us, are omnivores. It is also one of the only beasts on earth that is a threat to us.

In the spirit of Shaw's conquest, here are some other threatening animals and how best to prepare them should the occasion arise:

Python - You don't need to go deep into any jungles to find pythons. Florida houses many of the great snakes due in part to the breeding of escaped pets. The meat on this reptile is quite tough to tame. In order to tenderize it, the lean meat needs to be marinated for at least a day. Chowhound commentors suggest trying a mixture of soy and citrus. Then slow-cooking the meat over the course of a few hours, basting occasionally. Another option would be to make it into a sausage and thereby funneling it back into a form similar to its original.

Shark - The monster of the deep with bone-splitting jaws and rows of flesh-piercing teeth doesn't need "a bigger boat." In fact, according to Larousse Gastronomique it just needs to be bathed in a light brine (to neutralize the slight ammonia odor the big fish can often have) and then marinated several hours in citrus juice, garlic, salt and pepper. Grill the steaks or pan-roast them to the point of medium-well.

Alligators and Crocodiles - Down South and in Africa chefs aren't strangers to gators and crocs. The tail is full of meat that starts out quite tough but after simmering in a gumbo or jambalaya tastes like something in between chicken and fish. It is also good when ground up, made into patties and fried like a fish burger.

Lion - While we in no way condone the killing of the King of the Jungle, there are times when lion meat is available. Sometimes a male will become dangerous to the pack or people and there will be a need to put the lion to sleep. Rather than waste the meat of the great beast, the suggested method of preparation is to treat the steaks like, well, steak and, according to Commander's Wild Side, chicken-fry it and serve it up with gravy.


Lions and Tigers and Bears &ndash Oh, Yum!

It's not quite as prevalent today, though it is possible to find at specialty markets, so Shaw had to turn to a friend who had bagged a big one. With the meat he appropriately chose to make pelmeni, a Russian meat-filled dumpling that was traditionally frozen in the snow and eaten during bear-hunting trips. The dumplings were a success.

So why, if it is perfectly tasty ("damn good bear," as described by Shaw), is bear meat such an oddity to us? Shaw hypothesizes that (besides bear meat's rarity) it could be because bears, like us, are omnivores. It is also one of the only beasts on earth that is a threat to us.

In the spirit of Shaw's conquest, here are some other threatening animals and how best to prepare them should the occasion arise:

Python - You don't need to go deep into any jungles to find pythons. Florida houses many of the great snakes due in part to the breeding of escaped pets. The meat on this reptile is quite tough to tame. In order to tenderize it, the lean meat needs to be marinated for at least a day. Chowhound commentors suggest trying a mixture of soy and citrus. Then slow-cooking the meat over the course of a few hours, basting occasionally. Another option would be to make it into a sausage and thereby funneling it back into a form similar to its original.

Shark - The monster of the deep with bone-splitting jaws and rows of flesh-piercing teeth doesn't need "a bigger boat." In fact, according to Larousse Gastronomique it just needs to be bathed in a light brine (to neutralize the slight ammonia odor the big fish can often have) and then marinated several hours in citrus juice, garlic, salt and pepper. Grill the steaks or pan-roast them to the point of medium-well.

Alligators and Crocodiles - Down South and in Africa chefs aren't strangers to gators and crocs. The tail is full of meat that starts out quite tough but after simmering in a gumbo or jambalaya tastes like something in between chicken and fish. It is also good when ground up, made into patties and fried like a fish burger.

Lion - While we in no way condone the killing of the King of the Jungle, there are times when lion meat is available. Sometimes a male will become dangerous to the pack or people and there will be a need to put the lion to sleep. Rather than waste the meat of the great beast, the suggested method of preparation is to treat the steaks like, well, steak and, according to Commander's Wild Side, chicken-fry it and serve it up with gravy.


Lions and Tigers and Bears &ndash Oh, Yum!

It's not quite as prevalent today, though it is possible to find at specialty markets, so Shaw had to turn to a friend who had bagged a big one. With the meat he appropriately chose to make pelmeni, a Russian meat-filled dumpling that was traditionally frozen in the snow and eaten during bear-hunting trips. The dumplings were a success.

So why, if it is perfectly tasty ("damn good bear," as described by Shaw), is bear meat such an oddity to us? Shaw hypothesizes that (besides bear meat's rarity) it could be because bears, like us, are omnivores. It is also one of the only beasts on earth that is a threat to us.

In the spirit of Shaw's conquest, here are some other threatening animals and how best to prepare them should the occasion arise:

Python - You don't need to go deep into any jungles to find pythons. Florida houses many of the great snakes due in part to the breeding of escaped pets. The meat on this reptile is quite tough to tame. In order to tenderize it, the lean meat needs to be marinated for at least a day. Chowhound commentors suggest trying a mixture of soy and citrus. Then slow-cooking the meat over the course of a few hours, basting occasionally. Another option would be to make it into a sausage and thereby funneling it back into a form similar to its original.

Shark - The monster of the deep with bone-splitting jaws and rows of flesh-piercing teeth doesn't need "a bigger boat." In fact, according to Larousse Gastronomique it just needs to be bathed in a light brine (to neutralize the slight ammonia odor the big fish can often have) and then marinated several hours in citrus juice, garlic, salt and pepper. Grill the steaks or pan-roast them to the point of medium-well.

Alligators and Crocodiles - Down South and in Africa chefs aren't strangers to gators and crocs. The tail is full of meat that starts out quite tough but after simmering in a gumbo or jambalaya tastes like something in between chicken and fish. It is also good when ground up, made into patties and fried like a fish burger.

Lion - While we in no way condone the killing of the King of the Jungle, there are times when lion meat is available. Sometimes a male will become dangerous to the pack or people and there will be a need to put the lion to sleep. Rather than waste the meat of the great beast, the suggested method of preparation is to treat the steaks like, well, steak and, according to Commander's Wild Side, chicken-fry it and serve it up with gravy.


Lions and Tigers and Bears &ndash Oh, Yum!

It's not quite as prevalent today, though it is possible to find at specialty markets, so Shaw had to turn to a friend who had bagged a big one. With the meat he appropriately chose to make pelmeni, a Russian meat-filled dumpling that was traditionally frozen in the snow and eaten during bear-hunting trips. The dumplings were a success.

So why, if it is perfectly tasty ("damn good bear," as described by Shaw), is bear meat such an oddity to us? Shaw hypothesizes that (besides bear meat's rarity) it could be because bears, like us, are omnivores. It is also one of the only beasts on earth that is a threat to us.

In the spirit of Shaw's conquest, here are some other threatening animals and how best to prepare them should the occasion arise:

Python - You don't need to go deep into any jungles to find pythons. Florida houses many of the great snakes due in part to the breeding of escaped pets. The meat on this reptile is quite tough to tame. In order to tenderize it, the lean meat needs to be marinated for at least a day. Chowhound commentors suggest trying a mixture of soy and citrus. Then slow-cooking the meat over the course of a few hours, basting occasionally. Another option would be to make it into a sausage and thereby funneling it back into a form similar to its original.

Shark - The monster of the deep with bone-splitting jaws and rows of flesh-piercing teeth doesn't need "a bigger boat." In fact, according to Larousse Gastronomique it just needs to be bathed in a light brine (to neutralize the slight ammonia odor the big fish can often have) and then marinated several hours in citrus juice, garlic, salt and pepper. Grill the steaks or pan-roast them to the point of medium-well.

Alligators and Crocodiles - Down South and in Africa chefs aren't strangers to gators and crocs. The tail is full of meat that starts out quite tough but after simmering in a gumbo or jambalaya tastes like something in between chicken and fish. It is also good when ground up, made into patties and fried like a fish burger.

Lion - While we in no way condone the killing of the King of the Jungle, there are times when lion meat is available. Sometimes a male will become dangerous to the pack or people and there will be a need to put the lion to sleep. Rather than waste the meat of the great beast, the suggested method of preparation is to treat the steaks like, well, steak and, according to Commander's Wild Side, chicken-fry it and serve it up with gravy.


Lions and Tigers and Bears &ndash Oh, Yum!

It's not quite as prevalent today, though it is possible to find at specialty markets, so Shaw had to turn to a friend who had bagged a big one. With the meat he appropriately chose to make pelmeni, a Russian meat-filled dumpling that was traditionally frozen in the snow and eaten during bear-hunting trips. The dumplings were a success.

So why, if it is perfectly tasty ("damn good bear," as described by Shaw), is bear meat such an oddity to us? Shaw hypothesizes that (besides bear meat's rarity) it could be because bears, like us, are omnivores. It is also one of the only beasts on earth that is a threat to us.

In the spirit of Shaw's conquest, here are some other threatening animals and how best to prepare them should the occasion arise:

Python - You don't need to go deep into any jungles to find pythons. Florida houses many of the great snakes due in part to the breeding of escaped pets. The meat on this reptile is quite tough to tame. In order to tenderize it, the lean meat needs to be marinated for at least a day. Chowhound commentors suggest trying a mixture of soy and citrus. Then slow-cooking the meat over the course of a few hours, basting occasionally. Another option would be to make it into a sausage and thereby funneling it back into a form similar to its original.

Shark - The monster of the deep with bone-splitting jaws and rows of flesh-piercing teeth doesn't need "a bigger boat." In fact, according to Larousse Gastronomique it just needs to be bathed in a light brine (to neutralize the slight ammonia odor the big fish can often have) and then marinated several hours in citrus juice, garlic, salt and pepper. Grill the steaks or pan-roast them to the point of medium-well.

Alligators and Crocodiles - Down South and in Africa chefs aren't strangers to gators and crocs. The tail is full of meat that starts out quite tough but after simmering in a gumbo or jambalaya tastes like something in between chicken and fish. It is also good when ground up, made into patties and fried like a fish burger.

Lion - While we in no way condone the killing of the King of the Jungle, there are times when lion meat is available. Sometimes a male will become dangerous to the pack or people and there will be a need to put the lion to sleep. Rather than waste the meat of the great beast, the suggested method of preparation is to treat the steaks like, well, steak and, according to Commander's Wild Side, chicken-fry it and serve it up with gravy.


Lions and Tigers and Bears &ndash Oh, Yum!

It's not quite as prevalent today, though it is possible to find at specialty markets, so Shaw had to turn to a friend who had bagged a big one. With the meat he appropriately chose to make pelmeni, a Russian meat-filled dumpling that was traditionally frozen in the snow and eaten during bear-hunting trips. The dumplings were a success.

So why, if it is perfectly tasty ("damn good bear," as described by Shaw), is bear meat such an oddity to us? Shaw hypothesizes that (besides bear meat's rarity) it could be because bears, like us, are omnivores. It is also one of the only beasts on earth that is a threat to us.

In the spirit of Shaw's conquest, here are some other threatening animals and how best to prepare them should the occasion arise:

Python - You don't need to go deep into any jungles to find pythons. Florida houses many of the great snakes due in part to the breeding of escaped pets. The meat on this reptile is quite tough to tame. In order to tenderize it, the lean meat needs to be marinated for at least a day. Chowhound commentors suggest trying a mixture of soy and citrus. Then slow-cooking the meat over the course of a few hours, basting occasionally. Another option would be to make it into a sausage and thereby funneling it back into a form similar to its original.

Shark - The monster of the deep with bone-splitting jaws and rows of flesh-piercing teeth doesn't need "a bigger boat." In fact, according to Larousse Gastronomique it just needs to be bathed in a light brine (to neutralize the slight ammonia odor the big fish can often have) and then marinated several hours in citrus juice, garlic, salt and pepper. Grill the steaks or pan-roast them to the point of medium-well.

Alligators and Crocodiles - Down South and in Africa chefs aren't strangers to gators and crocs. The tail is full of meat that starts out quite tough but after simmering in a gumbo or jambalaya tastes like something in between chicken and fish. It is also good when ground up, made into patties and fried like a fish burger.

Lion - While we in no way condone the killing of the King of the Jungle, there are times when lion meat is available. Sometimes a male will become dangerous to the pack or people and there will be a need to put the lion to sleep. Rather than waste the meat of the great beast, the suggested method of preparation is to treat the steaks like, well, steak and, according to Commander's Wild Side, chicken-fry it and serve it up with gravy.


Lions and Tigers and Bears &ndash Oh, Yum!

It's not quite as prevalent today, though it is possible to find at specialty markets, so Shaw had to turn to a friend who had bagged a big one. With the meat he appropriately chose to make pelmeni, a Russian meat-filled dumpling that was traditionally frozen in the snow and eaten during bear-hunting trips. The dumplings were a success.

So why, if it is perfectly tasty ("damn good bear," as described by Shaw), is bear meat such an oddity to us? Shaw hypothesizes that (besides bear meat's rarity) it could be because bears, like us, are omnivores. It is also one of the only beasts on earth that is a threat to us.

In the spirit of Shaw's conquest, here are some other threatening animals and how best to prepare them should the occasion arise:

Python - You don't need to go deep into any jungles to find pythons. Florida houses many of the great snakes due in part to the breeding of escaped pets. The meat on this reptile is quite tough to tame. In order to tenderize it, the lean meat needs to be marinated for at least a day. Chowhound commentors suggest trying a mixture of soy and citrus. Then slow-cooking the meat over the course of a few hours, basting occasionally. Another option would be to make it into a sausage and thereby funneling it back into a form similar to its original.

Shark - The monster of the deep with bone-splitting jaws and rows of flesh-piercing teeth doesn't need "a bigger boat." In fact, according to Larousse Gastronomique it just needs to be bathed in a light brine (to neutralize the slight ammonia odor the big fish can often have) and then marinated several hours in citrus juice, garlic, salt and pepper. Grill the steaks or pan-roast them to the point of medium-well.

Alligators and Crocodiles - Down South and in Africa chefs aren't strangers to gators and crocs. The tail is full of meat that starts out quite tough but after simmering in a gumbo or jambalaya tastes like something in between chicken and fish. It is also good when ground up, made into patties and fried like a fish burger.

Lion - While we in no way condone the killing of the King of the Jungle, there are times when lion meat is available. Sometimes a male will become dangerous to the pack or people and there will be a need to put the lion to sleep. Rather than waste the meat of the great beast, the suggested method of preparation is to treat the steaks like, well, steak and, according to Commander's Wild Side, chicken-fry it and serve it up with gravy.


Lions and Tigers and Bears &ndash Oh, Yum!

It's not quite as prevalent today, though it is possible to find at specialty markets, so Shaw had to turn to a friend who had bagged a big one. With the meat he appropriately chose to make pelmeni, a Russian meat-filled dumpling that was traditionally frozen in the snow and eaten during bear-hunting trips. The dumplings were a success.

So why, if it is perfectly tasty ("damn good bear," as described by Shaw), is bear meat such an oddity to us? Shaw hypothesizes that (besides bear meat's rarity) it could be because bears, like us, are omnivores. It is also one of the only beasts on earth that is a threat to us.

In the spirit of Shaw's conquest, here are some other threatening animals and how best to prepare them should the occasion arise:

Python - You don't need to go deep into any jungles to find pythons. Florida houses many of the great snakes due in part to the breeding of escaped pets. The meat on this reptile is quite tough to tame. In order to tenderize it, the lean meat needs to be marinated for at least a day. Chowhound commentors suggest trying a mixture of soy and citrus. Then slow-cooking the meat over the course of a few hours, basting occasionally. Another option would be to make it into a sausage and thereby funneling it back into a form similar to its original.

Shark - The monster of the deep with bone-splitting jaws and rows of flesh-piercing teeth doesn't need "a bigger boat." In fact, according to Larousse Gastronomique it just needs to be bathed in a light brine (to neutralize the slight ammonia odor the big fish can often have) and then marinated several hours in citrus juice, garlic, salt and pepper. Grill the steaks or pan-roast them to the point of medium-well.

Alligators and Crocodiles - Down South and in Africa chefs aren't strangers to gators and crocs. The tail is full of meat that starts out quite tough but after simmering in a gumbo or jambalaya tastes like something in between chicken and fish. It is also good when ground up, made into patties and fried like a fish burger.

Lion - While we in no way condone the killing of the King of the Jungle, there are times when lion meat is available. Sometimes a male will become dangerous to the pack or people and there will be a need to put the lion to sleep. Rather than waste the meat of the great beast, the suggested method of preparation is to treat the steaks like, well, steak and, according to Commander's Wild Side, chicken-fry it and serve it up with gravy.