New recipes

Sourdough Sharing Bread

Sourdough Sharing Bread


A quick and easy recipe that is delicious

Jacqui Wedewer/The Daily Meal

Sourdough Sharing Bread

This recipe is quick, easy, and tasty and you can substitute the ingredients easily to vary the results.

Notes

As mentioned it’s a recipe that can very easily be adapted to suit your own tastes. Try a different type of cheese, or a flavored cheese or add some diced chorizo, bacon or garlic.

Ingredients

  • A loaf of (unsliced) sourdough bread.
  • 1/2 Cup butter
  • 4-5 scallions chopped
  • 2 Cups Cheddar (red or white)

Servings8

Calories Per Serving382

Folate equivalent (total)115µg29%


The Web’s Largest List of Sourdough Discard Recipes (2021)

Wondering what to do with that sourdough discard? Look no further! Leavenly has combed the Internet in search of the greatest sourdough discard recipes, from pancakes to crackers to tortillas to chocolate cake!

Currently the list is at 53 recipes, and growing. This page is updated frequently so don’t forget to bookmark it and check back!

When you bake sourdough, you need to have a starter. A starter is basically a little microbial world of bacteria and wild yeasts that thrive on the flour and water you feed them.

Regular (or yeasted) breads use commercial yeast to get their rise, whereas sourdough breads use a starter to get their rise. Learn more about sourdough bread here!

What is sourdough discard?

Sourdough discard is the sourdough starter you have left over after you’re done feeding. Feeding a starter just means you take a small amount of your existing starter and add water and flour. (Don’t have a starter? Learn How to Make Sourdough Starter in Six Easy Steps!)

But what happens to the rest of the starter that’s left behind – your discard?

You can discard it, as the name implies. Scrape it into the garbage, then rinse your container in hot soapy water.

You can add it to other recipes! This adds a boost of nutrition from your starter, and makes regular recipes more flavorful. For example, Belgian waffles are good, but sourdough Belgian waffles are amazing!

Sign up below to download your free PDF resource!

If you’re growing tired of feeding your starter, or if you’re planning a long vacation, consider drying your starter and storing it in the pantry. Check out How to Dry (and Revive) Your Sourdough Starter for Long-Term Storage for step-by-step instructions on both drying and reviving your starter.

The best way to use sourdough discard: Collect it!

Sourdough starter needs to be fed daily, which means you’ll have discard every day. If it works for you to use it in a different baking recipe every day, go right ahead!

But for most of us, we don’t have that time to dedicate in the kitchen. The best way is to scrape your discard into one collective jar in your fridge, making sure to use it once a week.

This is a great strategy for two reasons:

  1. It’s a better use of your time, rather than having to bake something new every day
  2. Some recipes call for a whole cup of discard, and it can take several days to accumulate that much discard

For us busy mamas, collecting sourdough discard through the week is a much more realistic option. This way, we can plan a baking day in the upcoming week (like a Saturday) and collect the discard until then!

Why store sourdough discard in the refrigerator?

You must store your sourdough discard in the refrigerator if you’re collecting it more than two days.

A sourdough starter will do fine for a couple days on the counter without feeding, but soon it will grow a layer of liquid on the top (hooch) and it will keep fermenting to develop a super sour taste that’s much too overpowering to use in recipes.

It’s best to store your discard in the fridge to slow down fermentation and get a mild sour tastes in your discard recipes.

My rule of thumb is this: collect discard for a week, and if you don’t use it, throw it away and start collecting again. I once made my favorite sourdough waffles with discard I collected over ten days or so, and they weren’t even edible. Despite being in the fridge, the discard continued to ferment and it developed that overly-sour flavor, which ruined the waffles. Learn from my mistakes!

How do I use sourdough discard?

If you’re anything like me, you’re constantly looking for new ways to use that precious discard. This post is for you, my friend!

I made this recipe round-up so it’s easy to find exactly what kind of recipe you’re craving. The recipes are divided by sweet and savory, so if you already know you want pretzels instead of cookies, that will help narrow it down.

Leavenly is a site for all things sourdough, so check out the resource page and my most popular post to date, List of the Best Sourdough Cookbooks.

Also check out this FREE resource guide: 10 Essential Tools for Baking Sourdough!

I’m personally baking my way through this list of sourdough discard recipes, and I will add commentary to my own recipes, and to those that I’ve personally made at home. Check back, as this will be updated often!


The Web’s Largest List of Sourdough Discard Recipes (2021)

Wondering what to do with that sourdough discard? Look no further! Leavenly has combed the Internet in search of the greatest sourdough discard recipes, from pancakes to crackers to tortillas to chocolate cake!

Currently the list is at 53 recipes, and growing. This page is updated frequently so don’t forget to bookmark it and check back!

When you bake sourdough, you need to have a starter. A starter is basically a little microbial world of bacteria and wild yeasts that thrive on the flour and water you feed them.

Regular (or yeasted) breads use commercial yeast to get their rise, whereas sourdough breads use a starter to get their rise. Learn more about sourdough bread here!

What is sourdough discard?

Sourdough discard is the sourdough starter you have left over after you’re done feeding. Feeding a starter just means you take a small amount of your existing starter and add water and flour. (Don’t have a starter? Learn How to Make Sourdough Starter in Six Easy Steps!)

But what happens to the rest of the starter that’s left behind – your discard?

You can discard it, as the name implies. Scrape it into the garbage, then rinse your container in hot soapy water.

You can add it to other recipes! This adds a boost of nutrition from your starter, and makes regular recipes more flavorful. For example, Belgian waffles are good, but sourdough Belgian waffles are amazing!

Sign up below to download your free PDF resource!

If you’re growing tired of feeding your starter, or if you’re planning a long vacation, consider drying your starter and storing it in the pantry. Check out How to Dry (and Revive) Your Sourdough Starter for Long-Term Storage for step-by-step instructions on both drying and reviving your starter.

The best way to use sourdough discard: Collect it!

Sourdough starter needs to be fed daily, which means you’ll have discard every day. If it works for you to use it in a different baking recipe every day, go right ahead!

But for most of us, we don’t have that time to dedicate in the kitchen. The best way is to scrape your discard into one collective jar in your fridge, making sure to use it once a week.

This is a great strategy for two reasons:

  1. It’s a better use of your time, rather than having to bake something new every day
  2. Some recipes call for a whole cup of discard, and it can take several days to accumulate that much discard

For us busy mamas, collecting sourdough discard through the week is a much more realistic option. This way, we can plan a baking day in the upcoming week (like a Saturday) and collect the discard until then!

Why store sourdough discard in the refrigerator?

You must store your sourdough discard in the refrigerator if you’re collecting it more than two days.

A sourdough starter will do fine for a couple days on the counter without feeding, but soon it will grow a layer of liquid on the top (hooch) and it will keep fermenting to develop a super sour taste that’s much too overpowering to use in recipes.

It’s best to store your discard in the fridge to slow down fermentation and get a mild sour tastes in your discard recipes.

My rule of thumb is this: collect discard for a week, and if you don’t use it, throw it away and start collecting again. I once made my favorite sourdough waffles with discard I collected over ten days or so, and they weren’t even edible. Despite being in the fridge, the discard continued to ferment and it developed that overly-sour flavor, which ruined the waffles. Learn from my mistakes!

How do I use sourdough discard?

If you’re anything like me, you’re constantly looking for new ways to use that precious discard. This post is for you, my friend!

I made this recipe round-up so it’s easy to find exactly what kind of recipe you’re craving. The recipes are divided by sweet and savory, so if you already know you want pretzels instead of cookies, that will help narrow it down.

Leavenly is a site for all things sourdough, so check out the resource page and my most popular post to date, List of the Best Sourdough Cookbooks.

Also check out this FREE resource guide: 10 Essential Tools for Baking Sourdough!

I’m personally baking my way through this list of sourdough discard recipes, and I will add commentary to my own recipes, and to those that I’ve personally made at home. Check back, as this will be updated often!


The Web’s Largest List of Sourdough Discard Recipes (2021)

Wondering what to do with that sourdough discard? Look no further! Leavenly has combed the Internet in search of the greatest sourdough discard recipes, from pancakes to crackers to tortillas to chocolate cake!

Currently the list is at 53 recipes, and growing. This page is updated frequently so don’t forget to bookmark it and check back!

When you bake sourdough, you need to have a starter. A starter is basically a little microbial world of bacteria and wild yeasts that thrive on the flour and water you feed them.

Regular (or yeasted) breads use commercial yeast to get their rise, whereas sourdough breads use a starter to get their rise. Learn more about sourdough bread here!

What is sourdough discard?

Sourdough discard is the sourdough starter you have left over after you’re done feeding. Feeding a starter just means you take a small amount of your existing starter and add water and flour. (Don’t have a starter? Learn How to Make Sourdough Starter in Six Easy Steps!)

But what happens to the rest of the starter that’s left behind – your discard?

You can discard it, as the name implies. Scrape it into the garbage, then rinse your container in hot soapy water.

You can add it to other recipes! This adds a boost of nutrition from your starter, and makes regular recipes more flavorful. For example, Belgian waffles are good, but sourdough Belgian waffles are amazing!

Sign up below to download your free PDF resource!

If you’re growing tired of feeding your starter, or if you’re planning a long vacation, consider drying your starter and storing it in the pantry. Check out How to Dry (and Revive) Your Sourdough Starter for Long-Term Storage for step-by-step instructions on both drying and reviving your starter.

The best way to use sourdough discard: Collect it!

Sourdough starter needs to be fed daily, which means you’ll have discard every day. If it works for you to use it in a different baking recipe every day, go right ahead!

But for most of us, we don’t have that time to dedicate in the kitchen. The best way is to scrape your discard into one collective jar in your fridge, making sure to use it once a week.

This is a great strategy for two reasons:

  1. It’s a better use of your time, rather than having to bake something new every day
  2. Some recipes call for a whole cup of discard, and it can take several days to accumulate that much discard

For us busy mamas, collecting sourdough discard through the week is a much more realistic option. This way, we can plan a baking day in the upcoming week (like a Saturday) and collect the discard until then!

Why store sourdough discard in the refrigerator?

You must store your sourdough discard in the refrigerator if you’re collecting it more than two days.

A sourdough starter will do fine for a couple days on the counter without feeding, but soon it will grow a layer of liquid on the top (hooch) and it will keep fermenting to develop a super sour taste that’s much too overpowering to use in recipes.

It’s best to store your discard in the fridge to slow down fermentation and get a mild sour tastes in your discard recipes.

My rule of thumb is this: collect discard for a week, and if you don’t use it, throw it away and start collecting again. I once made my favorite sourdough waffles with discard I collected over ten days or so, and they weren’t even edible. Despite being in the fridge, the discard continued to ferment and it developed that overly-sour flavor, which ruined the waffles. Learn from my mistakes!

How do I use sourdough discard?

If you’re anything like me, you’re constantly looking for new ways to use that precious discard. This post is for you, my friend!

I made this recipe round-up so it’s easy to find exactly what kind of recipe you’re craving. The recipes are divided by sweet and savory, so if you already know you want pretzels instead of cookies, that will help narrow it down.

Leavenly is a site for all things sourdough, so check out the resource page and my most popular post to date, List of the Best Sourdough Cookbooks.

Also check out this FREE resource guide: 10 Essential Tools for Baking Sourdough!

I’m personally baking my way through this list of sourdough discard recipes, and I will add commentary to my own recipes, and to those that I’ve personally made at home. Check back, as this will be updated often!


The Web’s Largest List of Sourdough Discard Recipes (2021)

Wondering what to do with that sourdough discard? Look no further! Leavenly has combed the Internet in search of the greatest sourdough discard recipes, from pancakes to crackers to tortillas to chocolate cake!

Currently the list is at 53 recipes, and growing. This page is updated frequently so don’t forget to bookmark it and check back!

When you bake sourdough, you need to have a starter. A starter is basically a little microbial world of bacteria and wild yeasts that thrive on the flour and water you feed them.

Regular (or yeasted) breads use commercial yeast to get their rise, whereas sourdough breads use a starter to get their rise. Learn more about sourdough bread here!

What is sourdough discard?

Sourdough discard is the sourdough starter you have left over after you’re done feeding. Feeding a starter just means you take a small amount of your existing starter and add water and flour. (Don’t have a starter? Learn How to Make Sourdough Starter in Six Easy Steps!)

But what happens to the rest of the starter that’s left behind – your discard?

You can discard it, as the name implies. Scrape it into the garbage, then rinse your container in hot soapy water.

You can add it to other recipes! This adds a boost of nutrition from your starter, and makes regular recipes more flavorful. For example, Belgian waffles are good, but sourdough Belgian waffles are amazing!

Sign up below to download your free PDF resource!

If you’re growing tired of feeding your starter, or if you’re planning a long vacation, consider drying your starter and storing it in the pantry. Check out How to Dry (and Revive) Your Sourdough Starter for Long-Term Storage for step-by-step instructions on both drying and reviving your starter.

The best way to use sourdough discard: Collect it!

Sourdough starter needs to be fed daily, which means you’ll have discard every day. If it works for you to use it in a different baking recipe every day, go right ahead!

But for most of us, we don’t have that time to dedicate in the kitchen. The best way is to scrape your discard into one collective jar in your fridge, making sure to use it once a week.

This is a great strategy for two reasons:

  1. It’s a better use of your time, rather than having to bake something new every day
  2. Some recipes call for a whole cup of discard, and it can take several days to accumulate that much discard

For us busy mamas, collecting sourdough discard through the week is a much more realistic option. This way, we can plan a baking day in the upcoming week (like a Saturday) and collect the discard until then!

Why store sourdough discard in the refrigerator?

You must store your sourdough discard in the refrigerator if you’re collecting it more than two days.

A sourdough starter will do fine for a couple days on the counter without feeding, but soon it will grow a layer of liquid on the top (hooch) and it will keep fermenting to develop a super sour taste that’s much too overpowering to use in recipes.

It’s best to store your discard in the fridge to slow down fermentation and get a mild sour tastes in your discard recipes.

My rule of thumb is this: collect discard for a week, and if you don’t use it, throw it away and start collecting again. I once made my favorite sourdough waffles with discard I collected over ten days or so, and they weren’t even edible. Despite being in the fridge, the discard continued to ferment and it developed that overly-sour flavor, which ruined the waffles. Learn from my mistakes!

How do I use sourdough discard?

If you’re anything like me, you’re constantly looking for new ways to use that precious discard. This post is for you, my friend!

I made this recipe round-up so it’s easy to find exactly what kind of recipe you’re craving. The recipes are divided by sweet and savory, so if you already know you want pretzels instead of cookies, that will help narrow it down.

Leavenly is a site for all things sourdough, so check out the resource page and my most popular post to date, List of the Best Sourdough Cookbooks.

Also check out this FREE resource guide: 10 Essential Tools for Baking Sourdough!

I’m personally baking my way through this list of sourdough discard recipes, and I will add commentary to my own recipes, and to those that I’ve personally made at home. Check back, as this will be updated often!


The Web’s Largest List of Sourdough Discard Recipes (2021)

Wondering what to do with that sourdough discard? Look no further! Leavenly has combed the Internet in search of the greatest sourdough discard recipes, from pancakes to crackers to tortillas to chocolate cake!

Currently the list is at 53 recipes, and growing. This page is updated frequently so don’t forget to bookmark it and check back!

When you bake sourdough, you need to have a starter. A starter is basically a little microbial world of bacteria and wild yeasts that thrive on the flour and water you feed them.

Regular (or yeasted) breads use commercial yeast to get their rise, whereas sourdough breads use a starter to get their rise. Learn more about sourdough bread here!

What is sourdough discard?

Sourdough discard is the sourdough starter you have left over after you’re done feeding. Feeding a starter just means you take a small amount of your existing starter and add water and flour. (Don’t have a starter? Learn How to Make Sourdough Starter in Six Easy Steps!)

But what happens to the rest of the starter that’s left behind – your discard?

You can discard it, as the name implies. Scrape it into the garbage, then rinse your container in hot soapy water.

You can add it to other recipes! This adds a boost of nutrition from your starter, and makes regular recipes more flavorful. For example, Belgian waffles are good, but sourdough Belgian waffles are amazing!

Sign up below to download your free PDF resource!

If you’re growing tired of feeding your starter, or if you’re planning a long vacation, consider drying your starter and storing it in the pantry. Check out How to Dry (and Revive) Your Sourdough Starter for Long-Term Storage for step-by-step instructions on both drying and reviving your starter.

The best way to use sourdough discard: Collect it!

Sourdough starter needs to be fed daily, which means you’ll have discard every day. If it works for you to use it in a different baking recipe every day, go right ahead!

But for most of us, we don’t have that time to dedicate in the kitchen. The best way is to scrape your discard into one collective jar in your fridge, making sure to use it once a week.

This is a great strategy for two reasons:

  1. It’s a better use of your time, rather than having to bake something new every day
  2. Some recipes call for a whole cup of discard, and it can take several days to accumulate that much discard

For us busy mamas, collecting sourdough discard through the week is a much more realistic option. This way, we can plan a baking day in the upcoming week (like a Saturday) and collect the discard until then!

Why store sourdough discard in the refrigerator?

You must store your sourdough discard in the refrigerator if you’re collecting it more than two days.

A sourdough starter will do fine for a couple days on the counter without feeding, but soon it will grow a layer of liquid on the top (hooch) and it will keep fermenting to develop a super sour taste that’s much too overpowering to use in recipes.

It’s best to store your discard in the fridge to slow down fermentation and get a mild sour tastes in your discard recipes.

My rule of thumb is this: collect discard for a week, and if you don’t use it, throw it away and start collecting again. I once made my favorite sourdough waffles with discard I collected over ten days or so, and they weren’t even edible. Despite being in the fridge, the discard continued to ferment and it developed that overly-sour flavor, which ruined the waffles. Learn from my mistakes!

How do I use sourdough discard?

If you’re anything like me, you’re constantly looking for new ways to use that precious discard. This post is for you, my friend!

I made this recipe round-up so it’s easy to find exactly what kind of recipe you’re craving. The recipes are divided by sweet and savory, so if you already know you want pretzels instead of cookies, that will help narrow it down.

Leavenly is a site for all things sourdough, so check out the resource page and my most popular post to date, List of the Best Sourdough Cookbooks.

Also check out this FREE resource guide: 10 Essential Tools for Baking Sourdough!

I’m personally baking my way through this list of sourdough discard recipes, and I will add commentary to my own recipes, and to those that I’ve personally made at home. Check back, as this will be updated often!


The Web’s Largest List of Sourdough Discard Recipes (2021)

Wondering what to do with that sourdough discard? Look no further! Leavenly has combed the Internet in search of the greatest sourdough discard recipes, from pancakes to crackers to tortillas to chocolate cake!

Currently the list is at 53 recipes, and growing. This page is updated frequently so don’t forget to bookmark it and check back!

When you bake sourdough, you need to have a starter. A starter is basically a little microbial world of bacteria and wild yeasts that thrive on the flour and water you feed them.

Regular (or yeasted) breads use commercial yeast to get their rise, whereas sourdough breads use a starter to get their rise. Learn more about sourdough bread here!

What is sourdough discard?

Sourdough discard is the sourdough starter you have left over after you’re done feeding. Feeding a starter just means you take a small amount of your existing starter and add water and flour. (Don’t have a starter? Learn How to Make Sourdough Starter in Six Easy Steps!)

But what happens to the rest of the starter that’s left behind – your discard?

You can discard it, as the name implies. Scrape it into the garbage, then rinse your container in hot soapy water.

You can add it to other recipes! This adds a boost of nutrition from your starter, and makes regular recipes more flavorful. For example, Belgian waffles are good, but sourdough Belgian waffles are amazing!

Sign up below to download your free PDF resource!

If you’re growing tired of feeding your starter, or if you’re planning a long vacation, consider drying your starter and storing it in the pantry. Check out How to Dry (and Revive) Your Sourdough Starter for Long-Term Storage for step-by-step instructions on both drying and reviving your starter.

The best way to use sourdough discard: Collect it!

Sourdough starter needs to be fed daily, which means you’ll have discard every day. If it works for you to use it in a different baking recipe every day, go right ahead!

But for most of us, we don’t have that time to dedicate in the kitchen. The best way is to scrape your discard into one collective jar in your fridge, making sure to use it once a week.

This is a great strategy for two reasons:

  1. It’s a better use of your time, rather than having to bake something new every day
  2. Some recipes call for a whole cup of discard, and it can take several days to accumulate that much discard

For us busy mamas, collecting sourdough discard through the week is a much more realistic option. This way, we can plan a baking day in the upcoming week (like a Saturday) and collect the discard until then!

Why store sourdough discard in the refrigerator?

You must store your sourdough discard in the refrigerator if you’re collecting it more than two days.

A sourdough starter will do fine for a couple days on the counter without feeding, but soon it will grow a layer of liquid on the top (hooch) and it will keep fermenting to develop a super sour taste that’s much too overpowering to use in recipes.

It’s best to store your discard in the fridge to slow down fermentation and get a mild sour tastes in your discard recipes.

My rule of thumb is this: collect discard for a week, and if you don’t use it, throw it away and start collecting again. I once made my favorite sourdough waffles with discard I collected over ten days or so, and they weren’t even edible. Despite being in the fridge, the discard continued to ferment and it developed that overly-sour flavor, which ruined the waffles. Learn from my mistakes!

How do I use sourdough discard?

If you’re anything like me, you’re constantly looking for new ways to use that precious discard. This post is for you, my friend!

I made this recipe round-up so it’s easy to find exactly what kind of recipe you’re craving. The recipes are divided by sweet and savory, so if you already know you want pretzels instead of cookies, that will help narrow it down.

Leavenly is a site for all things sourdough, so check out the resource page and my most popular post to date, List of the Best Sourdough Cookbooks.

Also check out this FREE resource guide: 10 Essential Tools for Baking Sourdough!

I’m personally baking my way through this list of sourdough discard recipes, and I will add commentary to my own recipes, and to those that I’ve personally made at home. Check back, as this will be updated often!


The Web’s Largest List of Sourdough Discard Recipes (2021)

Wondering what to do with that sourdough discard? Look no further! Leavenly has combed the Internet in search of the greatest sourdough discard recipes, from pancakes to crackers to tortillas to chocolate cake!

Currently the list is at 53 recipes, and growing. This page is updated frequently so don’t forget to bookmark it and check back!

When you bake sourdough, you need to have a starter. A starter is basically a little microbial world of bacteria and wild yeasts that thrive on the flour and water you feed them.

Regular (or yeasted) breads use commercial yeast to get their rise, whereas sourdough breads use a starter to get their rise. Learn more about sourdough bread here!

What is sourdough discard?

Sourdough discard is the sourdough starter you have left over after you’re done feeding. Feeding a starter just means you take a small amount of your existing starter and add water and flour. (Don’t have a starter? Learn How to Make Sourdough Starter in Six Easy Steps!)

But what happens to the rest of the starter that’s left behind – your discard?

You can discard it, as the name implies. Scrape it into the garbage, then rinse your container in hot soapy water.

You can add it to other recipes! This adds a boost of nutrition from your starter, and makes regular recipes more flavorful. For example, Belgian waffles are good, but sourdough Belgian waffles are amazing!

Sign up below to download your free PDF resource!

If you’re growing tired of feeding your starter, or if you’re planning a long vacation, consider drying your starter and storing it in the pantry. Check out How to Dry (and Revive) Your Sourdough Starter for Long-Term Storage for step-by-step instructions on both drying and reviving your starter.

The best way to use sourdough discard: Collect it!

Sourdough starter needs to be fed daily, which means you’ll have discard every day. If it works for you to use it in a different baking recipe every day, go right ahead!

But for most of us, we don’t have that time to dedicate in the kitchen. The best way is to scrape your discard into one collective jar in your fridge, making sure to use it once a week.

This is a great strategy for two reasons:

  1. It’s a better use of your time, rather than having to bake something new every day
  2. Some recipes call for a whole cup of discard, and it can take several days to accumulate that much discard

For us busy mamas, collecting sourdough discard through the week is a much more realistic option. This way, we can plan a baking day in the upcoming week (like a Saturday) and collect the discard until then!

Why store sourdough discard in the refrigerator?

You must store your sourdough discard in the refrigerator if you’re collecting it more than two days.

A sourdough starter will do fine for a couple days on the counter without feeding, but soon it will grow a layer of liquid on the top (hooch) and it will keep fermenting to develop a super sour taste that’s much too overpowering to use in recipes.

It’s best to store your discard in the fridge to slow down fermentation and get a mild sour tastes in your discard recipes.

My rule of thumb is this: collect discard for a week, and if you don’t use it, throw it away and start collecting again. I once made my favorite sourdough waffles with discard I collected over ten days or so, and they weren’t even edible. Despite being in the fridge, the discard continued to ferment and it developed that overly-sour flavor, which ruined the waffles. Learn from my mistakes!

How do I use sourdough discard?

If you’re anything like me, you’re constantly looking for new ways to use that precious discard. This post is for you, my friend!

I made this recipe round-up so it’s easy to find exactly what kind of recipe you’re craving. The recipes are divided by sweet and savory, so if you already know you want pretzels instead of cookies, that will help narrow it down.

Leavenly is a site for all things sourdough, so check out the resource page and my most popular post to date, List of the Best Sourdough Cookbooks.

Also check out this FREE resource guide: 10 Essential Tools for Baking Sourdough!

I’m personally baking my way through this list of sourdough discard recipes, and I will add commentary to my own recipes, and to those that I’ve personally made at home. Check back, as this will be updated often!


The Web’s Largest List of Sourdough Discard Recipes (2021)

Wondering what to do with that sourdough discard? Look no further! Leavenly has combed the Internet in search of the greatest sourdough discard recipes, from pancakes to crackers to tortillas to chocolate cake!

Currently the list is at 53 recipes, and growing. This page is updated frequently so don’t forget to bookmark it and check back!

When you bake sourdough, you need to have a starter. A starter is basically a little microbial world of bacteria and wild yeasts that thrive on the flour and water you feed them.

Regular (or yeasted) breads use commercial yeast to get their rise, whereas sourdough breads use a starter to get their rise. Learn more about sourdough bread here!

What is sourdough discard?

Sourdough discard is the sourdough starter you have left over after you’re done feeding. Feeding a starter just means you take a small amount of your existing starter and add water and flour. (Don’t have a starter? Learn How to Make Sourdough Starter in Six Easy Steps!)

But what happens to the rest of the starter that’s left behind – your discard?

You can discard it, as the name implies. Scrape it into the garbage, then rinse your container in hot soapy water.

You can add it to other recipes! This adds a boost of nutrition from your starter, and makes regular recipes more flavorful. For example, Belgian waffles are good, but sourdough Belgian waffles are amazing!

Sign up below to download your free PDF resource!

If you’re growing tired of feeding your starter, or if you’re planning a long vacation, consider drying your starter and storing it in the pantry. Check out How to Dry (and Revive) Your Sourdough Starter for Long-Term Storage for step-by-step instructions on both drying and reviving your starter.

The best way to use sourdough discard: Collect it!

Sourdough starter needs to be fed daily, which means you’ll have discard every day. If it works for you to use it in a different baking recipe every day, go right ahead!

But for most of us, we don’t have that time to dedicate in the kitchen. The best way is to scrape your discard into one collective jar in your fridge, making sure to use it once a week.

This is a great strategy for two reasons:

  1. It’s a better use of your time, rather than having to bake something new every day
  2. Some recipes call for a whole cup of discard, and it can take several days to accumulate that much discard

For us busy mamas, collecting sourdough discard through the week is a much more realistic option. This way, we can plan a baking day in the upcoming week (like a Saturday) and collect the discard until then!

Why store sourdough discard in the refrigerator?

You must store your sourdough discard in the refrigerator if you’re collecting it more than two days.

A sourdough starter will do fine for a couple days on the counter without feeding, but soon it will grow a layer of liquid on the top (hooch) and it will keep fermenting to develop a super sour taste that’s much too overpowering to use in recipes.

It’s best to store your discard in the fridge to slow down fermentation and get a mild sour tastes in your discard recipes.

My rule of thumb is this: collect discard for a week, and if you don’t use it, throw it away and start collecting again. I once made my favorite sourdough waffles with discard I collected over ten days or so, and they weren’t even edible. Despite being in the fridge, the discard continued to ferment and it developed that overly-sour flavor, which ruined the waffles. Learn from my mistakes!

How do I use sourdough discard?

If you’re anything like me, you’re constantly looking for new ways to use that precious discard. This post is for you, my friend!

I made this recipe round-up so it’s easy to find exactly what kind of recipe you’re craving. The recipes are divided by sweet and savory, so if you already know you want pretzels instead of cookies, that will help narrow it down.

Leavenly is a site for all things sourdough, so check out the resource page and my most popular post to date, List of the Best Sourdough Cookbooks.

Also check out this FREE resource guide: 10 Essential Tools for Baking Sourdough!

I’m personally baking my way through this list of sourdough discard recipes, and I will add commentary to my own recipes, and to those that I’ve personally made at home. Check back, as this will be updated often!


The Web’s Largest List of Sourdough Discard Recipes (2021)

Wondering what to do with that sourdough discard? Look no further! Leavenly has combed the Internet in search of the greatest sourdough discard recipes, from pancakes to crackers to tortillas to chocolate cake!

Currently the list is at 53 recipes, and growing. This page is updated frequently so don’t forget to bookmark it and check back!

When you bake sourdough, you need to have a starter. A starter is basically a little microbial world of bacteria and wild yeasts that thrive on the flour and water you feed them.

Regular (or yeasted) breads use commercial yeast to get their rise, whereas sourdough breads use a starter to get their rise. Learn more about sourdough bread here!

What is sourdough discard?

Sourdough discard is the sourdough starter you have left over after you’re done feeding. Feeding a starter just means you take a small amount of your existing starter and add water and flour. (Don’t have a starter? Learn How to Make Sourdough Starter in Six Easy Steps!)

But what happens to the rest of the starter that’s left behind – your discard?

You can discard it, as the name implies. Scrape it into the garbage, then rinse your container in hot soapy water.

You can add it to other recipes! This adds a boost of nutrition from your starter, and makes regular recipes more flavorful. For example, Belgian waffles are good, but sourdough Belgian waffles are amazing!

Sign up below to download your free PDF resource!

If you’re growing tired of feeding your starter, or if you’re planning a long vacation, consider drying your starter and storing it in the pantry. Check out How to Dry (and Revive) Your Sourdough Starter for Long-Term Storage for step-by-step instructions on both drying and reviving your starter.

The best way to use sourdough discard: Collect it!

Sourdough starter needs to be fed daily, which means you’ll have discard every day. If it works for you to use it in a different baking recipe every day, go right ahead!

But for most of us, we don’t have that time to dedicate in the kitchen. The best way is to scrape your discard into one collective jar in your fridge, making sure to use it once a week.

This is a great strategy for two reasons:

  1. It’s a better use of your time, rather than having to bake something new every day
  2. Some recipes call for a whole cup of discard, and it can take several days to accumulate that much discard

For us busy mamas, collecting sourdough discard through the week is a much more realistic option. This way, we can plan a baking day in the upcoming week (like a Saturday) and collect the discard until then!

Why store sourdough discard in the refrigerator?

You must store your sourdough discard in the refrigerator if you’re collecting it more than two days.

A sourdough starter will do fine for a couple days on the counter without feeding, but soon it will grow a layer of liquid on the top (hooch) and it will keep fermenting to develop a super sour taste that’s much too overpowering to use in recipes.

It’s best to store your discard in the fridge to slow down fermentation and get a mild sour tastes in your discard recipes.

My rule of thumb is this: collect discard for a week, and if you don’t use it, throw it away and start collecting again. I once made my favorite sourdough waffles with discard I collected over ten days or so, and they weren’t even edible. Despite being in the fridge, the discard continued to ferment and it developed that overly-sour flavor, which ruined the waffles. Learn from my mistakes!

How do I use sourdough discard?

If you’re anything like me, you’re constantly looking for new ways to use that precious discard. This post is for you, my friend!

I made this recipe round-up so it’s easy to find exactly what kind of recipe you’re craving. The recipes are divided by sweet and savory, so if you already know you want pretzels instead of cookies, that will help narrow it down.

Leavenly is a site for all things sourdough, so check out the resource page and my most popular post to date, List of the Best Sourdough Cookbooks.

Also check out this FREE resource guide: 10 Essential Tools for Baking Sourdough!

I’m personally baking my way through this list of sourdough discard recipes, and I will add commentary to my own recipes, and to those that I’ve personally made at home. Check back, as this will be updated often!


The Web’s Largest List of Sourdough Discard Recipes (2021)

Wondering what to do with that sourdough discard? Look no further! Leavenly has combed the Internet in search of the greatest sourdough discard recipes, from pancakes to crackers to tortillas to chocolate cake!

Currently the list is at 53 recipes, and growing. This page is updated frequently so don’t forget to bookmark it and check back!

When you bake sourdough, you need to have a starter. A starter is basically a little microbial world of bacteria and wild yeasts that thrive on the flour and water you feed them.

Regular (or yeasted) breads use commercial yeast to get their rise, whereas sourdough breads use a starter to get their rise. Learn more about sourdough bread here!

What is sourdough discard?

Sourdough discard is the sourdough starter you have left over after you’re done feeding. Feeding a starter just means you take a small amount of your existing starter and add water and flour. (Don’t have a starter? Learn How to Make Sourdough Starter in Six Easy Steps!)

But what happens to the rest of the starter that’s left behind – your discard?

You can discard it, as the name implies. Scrape it into the garbage, then rinse your container in hot soapy water.

You can add it to other recipes! This adds a boost of nutrition from your starter, and makes regular recipes more flavorful. For example, Belgian waffles are good, but sourdough Belgian waffles are amazing!

Sign up below to download your free PDF resource!

If you’re growing tired of feeding your starter, or if you’re planning a long vacation, consider drying your starter and storing it in the pantry. Check out How to Dry (and Revive) Your Sourdough Starter for Long-Term Storage for step-by-step instructions on both drying and reviving your starter.

The best way to use sourdough discard: Collect it!

Sourdough starter needs to be fed daily, which means you’ll have discard every day. If it works for you to use it in a different baking recipe every day, go right ahead!

But for most of us, we don’t have that time to dedicate in the kitchen. The best way is to scrape your discard into one collective jar in your fridge, making sure to use it once a week.

This is a great strategy for two reasons:

  1. It’s a better use of your time, rather than having to bake something new every day
  2. Some recipes call for a whole cup of discard, and it can take several days to accumulate that much discard

For us busy mamas, collecting sourdough discard through the week is a much more realistic option. This way, we can plan a baking day in the upcoming week (like a Saturday) and collect the discard until then!

Why store sourdough discard in the refrigerator?

You must store your sourdough discard in the refrigerator if you’re collecting it more than two days.

A sourdough starter will do fine for a couple days on the counter without feeding, but soon it will grow a layer of liquid on the top (hooch) and it will keep fermenting to develop a super sour taste that’s much too overpowering to use in recipes.

It’s best to store your discard in the fridge to slow down fermentation and get a mild sour tastes in your discard recipes.

My rule of thumb is this: collect discard for a week, and if you don’t use it, throw it away and start collecting again. I once made my favorite sourdough waffles with discard I collected over ten days or so, and they weren’t even edible. Despite being in the fridge, the discard continued to ferment and it developed that overly-sour flavor, which ruined the waffles. Learn from my mistakes!

How do I use sourdough discard?

If you’re anything like me, you’re constantly looking for new ways to use that precious discard. This post is for you, my friend!

I made this recipe round-up so it’s easy to find exactly what kind of recipe you’re craving. The recipes are divided by sweet and savory, so if you already know you want pretzels instead of cookies, that will help narrow it down.

Leavenly is a site for all things sourdough, so check out the resource page and my most popular post to date, List of the Best Sourdough Cookbooks.

Also check out this FREE resource guide: 10 Essential Tools for Baking Sourdough!

I’m personally baking my way through this list of sourdough discard recipes, and I will add commentary to my own recipes, and to those that I’ve personally made at home. Check back, as this will be updated often!