New recipes

Traveling 101: What to Pack and Not to Pack According to the Experts

Traveling 101: What to Pack and Not to Pack According to the Experts


Carrying too much baggage? Allow us to lighten your load with these vacation packing tips

A travel organizer will, in fact, keep your travels more organized.

When you really think about it, most of the hassles of traveling include luggage in some way — especially when it comes to flying. Carrying on? Well then you have to jam it into the X-ray machine, possibly have a rubber-gloved agent paw through your possessions, miraculously close it all up again, maneuver it down the narrow aisle of a plane, and squeeze it into a tiny cabinet — only to have it fly out and hit you in the face upon arrival. You then have to drag your recent attacker all through a second airport (or more, if you have a layover) before finally reaching your accommodations for the night, opening up your bag, and realizing you basically forgot everything you needed.

Click here for Traveling 101: What to Pack and Not to Pack According to the Experts

​Sound familiar?

Allow us to spare you some of the headache (and arm-ache, and backache) by helping with the very first step. Determining what to bring and what not to bring can save you from unnecessarily lugging around too much stuff, and also make sure that you’re not forgetting anything important. Packing twelve pairs of socks for a three-day weekend might be a bit of overkill, for instance, especially since all the socks in the world won’t get you on an international flight when you’ve forgotten your passport. (Just ask my mom, my dad, and one of my sisters… all on separate trips.) You may think you’re a packing pro, but we’ve compiled some expert tips that could make you rethink the way you travel. The exact details will obviously vary based on the trip, but here are some solid suggestions to get you started.


How to Avoid Germs While Traveling, According to Experts

Before you board a plane or book a hotel room, consider these health hacks to prevent sickness.

What you pack and how you prepare can help keep harmful bacteria at bay when traveling.

Whether you’re on your way to Hawaii to relax on the beach or heading to Beijing for work, traveling can be stressful. The last thing you want to worry about is getting sick. Unfortunately, there are germs lurking on every door handle, tray table, and restaurant menu.

According to one study published in August 2018 in the journal BMC Infectious Diseases, which was conducted at the Helsinki-Vantaa airport in Finland, the plastic trays at the security checkpoint were crawling with more germs than even the bathroom doorknobs and toilet flush buttons.

The list of disease-causing bacteria found on surfaces like hotel bathroom countertops and subway poles can sound terrifying: staphylococcus, Bacillus spp, E. coli, and even drug-resistant organisms. It’s true, things that get touched by a lot of people are gross, and the germs left behind can be harmful. But there are actions you can take to increase your chances of having a healthy trip.

“You can’t always ‘not touch’ things,” says John Gobbels, a former flight nurse and paramedic, and chief operating officer of MedjetAssist, a company that specializes in medical transports and travel safety. “But if you avoid contact between your hands and your eyes, nose, and mouth until you can wash or sanitize them, that will help cut down on a lot of transmission.”


How to Avoid Germs While Traveling, According to Experts

Before you board a plane or book a hotel room, consider these health hacks to prevent sickness.

What you pack and how you prepare can help keep harmful bacteria at bay when traveling.

Whether you’re on your way to Hawaii to relax on the beach or heading to Beijing for work, traveling can be stressful. The last thing you want to worry about is getting sick. Unfortunately, there are germs lurking on every door handle, tray table, and restaurant menu.

According to one study published in August 2018 in the journal BMC Infectious Diseases, which was conducted at the Helsinki-Vantaa airport in Finland, the plastic trays at the security checkpoint were crawling with more germs than even the bathroom doorknobs and toilet flush buttons.

The list of disease-causing bacteria found on surfaces like hotel bathroom countertops and subway poles can sound terrifying: staphylococcus, Bacillus spp, E. coli, and even drug-resistant organisms. It’s true, things that get touched by a lot of people are gross, and the germs left behind can be harmful. But there are actions you can take to increase your chances of having a healthy trip.

“You can’t always ‘not touch’ things,” says John Gobbels, a former flight nurse and paramedic, and chief operating officer of MedjetAssist, a company that specializes in medical transports and travel safety. “But if you avoid contact between your hands and your eyes, nose, and mouth until you can wash or sanitize them, that will help cut down on a lot of transmission.”


How to Avoid Germs While Traveling, According to Experts

Before you board a plane or book a hotel room, consider these health hacks to prevent sickness.

What you pack and how you prepare can help keep harmful bacteria at bay when traveling.

Whether you’re on your way to Hawaii to relax on the beach or heading to Beijing for work, traveling can be stressful. The last thing you want to worry about is getting sick. Unfortunately, there are germs lurking on every door handle, tray table, and restaurant menu.

According to one study published in August 2018 in the journal BMC Infectious Diseases, which was conducted at the Helsinki-Vantaa airport in Finland, the plastic trays at the security checkpoint were crawling with more germs than even the bathroom doorknobs and toilet flush buttons.

The list of disease-causing bacteria found on surfaces like hotel bathroom countertops and subway poles can sound terrifying: staphylococcus, Bacillus spp, E. coli, and even drug-resistant organisms. It’s true, things that get touched by a lot of people are gross, and the germs left behind can be harmful. But there are actions you can take to increase your chances of having a healthy trip.

“You can’t always ‘not touch’ things,” says John Gobbels, a former flight nurse and paramedic, and chief operating officer of MedjetAssist, a company that specializes in medical transports and travel safety. “But if you avoid contact between your hands and your eyes, nose, and mouth until you can wash or sanitize them, that will help cut down on a lot of transmission.”


How to Avoid Germs While Traveling, According to Experts

Before you board a plane or book a hotel room, consider these health hacks to prevent sickness.

What you pack and how you prepare can help keep harmful bacteria at bay when traveling.

Whether you’re on your way to Hawaii to relax on the beach or heading to Beijing for work, traveling can be stressful. The last thing you want to worry about is getting sick. Unfortunately, there are germs lurking on every door handle, tray table, and restaurant menu.

According to one study published in August 2018 in the journal BMC Infectious Diseases, which was conducted at the Helsinki-Vantaa airport in Finland, the plastic trays at the security checkpoint were crawling with more germs than even the bathroom doorknobs and toilet flush buttons.

The list of disease-causing bacteria found on surfaces like hotel bathroom countertops and subway poles can sound terrifying: staphylococcus, Bacillus spp, E. coli, and even drug-resistant organisms. It’s true, things that get touched by a lot of people are gross, and the germs left behind can be harmful. But there are actions you can take to increase your chances of having a healthy trip.

“You can’t always ‘not touch’ things,” says John Gobbels, a former flight nurse and paramedic, and chief operating officer of MedjetAssist, a company that specializes in medical transports and travel safety. “But if you avoid contact between your hands and your eyes, nose, and mouth until you can wash or sanitize them, that will help cut down on a lot of transmission.”


How to Avoid Germs While Traveling, According to Experts

Before you board a plane or book a hotel room, consider these health hacks to prevent sickness.

What you pack and how you prepare can help keep harmful bacteria at bay when traveling.

Whether you’re on your way to Hawaii to relax on the beach or heading to Beijing for work, traveling can be stressful. The last thing you want to worry about is getting sick. Unfortunately, there are germs lurking on every door handle, tray table, and restaurant menu.

According to one study published in August 2018 in the journal BMC Infectious Diseases, which was conducted at the Helsinki-Vantaa airport in Finland, the plastic trays at the security checkpoint were crawling with more germs than even the bathroom doorknobs and toilet flush buttons.

The list of disease-causing bacteria found on surfaces like hotel bathroom countertops and subway poles can sound terrifying: staphylococcus, Bacillus spp, E. coli, and even drug-resistant organisms. It’s true, things that get touched by a lot of people are gross, and the germs left behind can be harmful. But there are actions you can take to increase your chances of having a healthy trip.

“You can’t always ‘not touch’ things,” says John Gobbels, a former flight nurse and paramedic, and chief operating officer of MedjetAssist, a company that specializes in medical transports and travel safety. “But if you avoid contact between your hands and your eyes, nose, and mouth until you can wash or sanitize them, that will help cut down on a lot of transmission.”


How to Avoid Germs While Traveling, According to Experts

Before you board a plane or book a hotel room, consider these health hacks to prevent sickness.

What you pack and how you prepare can help keep harmful bacteria at bay when traveling.

Whether you’re on your way to Hawaii to relax on the beach or heading to Beijing for work, traveling can be stressful. The last thing you want to worry about is getting sick. Unfortunately, there are germs lurking on every door handle, tray table, and restaurant menu.

According to one study published in August 2018 in the journal BMC Infectious Diseases, which was conducted at the Helsinki-Vantaa airport in Finland, the plastic trays at the security checkpoint were crawling with more germs than even the bathroom doorknobs and toilet flush buttons.

The list of disease-causing bacteria found on surfaces like hotel bathroom countertops and subway poles can sound terrifying: staphylococcus, Bacillus spp, E. coli, and even drug-resistant organisms. It’s true, things that get touched by a lot of people are gross, and the germs left behind can be harmful. But there are actions you can take to increase your chances of having a healthy trip.

“You can’t always ‘not touch’ things,” says John Gobbels, a former flight nurse and paramedic, and chief operating officer of MedjetAssist, a company that specializes in medical transports and travel safety. “But if you avoid contact between your hands and your eyes, nose, and mouth until you can wash or sanitize them, that will help cut down on a lot of transmission.”


How to Avoid Germs While Traveling, According to Experts

Before you board a plane or book a hotel room, consider these health hacks to prevent sickness.

What you pack and how you prepare can help keep harmful bacteria at bay when traveling.

Whether you’re on your way to Hawaii to relax on the beach or heading to Beijing for work, traveling can be stressful. The last thing you want to worry about is getting sick. Unfortunately, there are germs lurking on every door handle, tray table, and restaurant menu.

According to one study published in August 2018 in the journal BMC Infectious Diseases, which was conducted at the Helsinki-Vantaa airport in Finland, the plastic trays at the security checkpoint were crawling with more germs than even the bathroom doorknobs and toilet flush buttons.

The list of disease-causing bacteria found on surfaces like hotel bathroom countertops and subway poles can sound terrifying: staphylococcus, Bacillus spp, E. coli, and even drug-resistant organisms. It’s true, things that get touched by a lot of people are gross, and the germs left behind can be harmful. But there are actions you can take to increase your chances of having a healthy trip.

“You can’t always ‘not touch’ things,” says John Gobbels, a former flight nurse and paramedic, and chief operating officer of MedjetAssist, a company that specializes in medical transports and travel safety. “But if you avoid contact between your hands and your eyes, nose, and mouth until you can wash or sanitize them, that will help cut down on a lot of transmission.”


How to Avoid Germs While Traveling, According to Experts

Before you board a plane or book a hotel room, consider these health hacks to prevent sickness.

What you pack and how you prepare can help keep harmful bacteria at bay when traveling.

Whether you’re on your way to Hawaii to relax on the beach or heading to Beijing for work, traveling can be stressful. The last thing you want to worry about is getting sick. Unfortunately, there are germs lurking on every door handle, tray table, and restaurant menu.

According to one study published in August 2018 in the journal BMC Infectious Diseases, which was conducted at the Helsinki-Vantaa airport in Finland, the plastic trays at the security checkpoint were crawling with more germs than even the bathroom doorknobs and toilet flush buttons.

The list of disease-causing bacteria found on surfaces like hotel bathroom countertops and subway poles can sound terrifying: staphylococcus, Bacillus spp, E. coli, and even drug-resistant organisms. It’s true, things that get touched by a lot of people are gross, and the germs left behind can be harmful. But there are actions you can take to increase your chances of having a healthy trip.

“You can’t always ‘not touch’ things,” says John Gobbels, a former flight nurse and paramedic, and chief operating officer of MedjetAssist, a company that specializes in medical transports and travel safety. “But if you avoid contact between your hands and your eyes, nose, and mouth until you can wash or sanitize them, that will help cut down on a lot of transmission.”


How to Avoid Germs While Traveling, According to Experts

Before you board a plane or book a hotel room, consider these health hacks to prevent sickness.

What you pack and how you prepare can help keep harmful bacteria at bay when traveling.

Whether you’re on your way to Hawaii to relax on the beach or heading to Beijing for work, traveling can be stressful. The last thing you want to worry about is getting sick. Unfortunately, there are germs lurking on every door handle, tray table, and restaurant menu.

According to one study published in August 2018 in the journal BMC Infectious Diseases, which was conducted at the Helsinki-Vantaa airport in Finland, the plastic trays at the security checkpoint were crawling with more germs than even the bathroom doorknobs and toilet flush buttons.

The list of disease-causing bacteria found on surfaces like hotel bathroom countertops and subway poles can sound terrifying: staphylococcus, Bacillus spp, E. coli, and even drug-resistant organisms. It’s true, things that get touched by a lot of people are gross, and the germs left behind can be harmful. But there are actions you can take to increase your chances of having a healthy trip.

“You can’t always ‘not touch’ things,” says John Gobbels, a former flight nurse and paramedic, and chief operating officer of MedjetAssist, a company that specializes in medical transports and travel safety. “But if you avoid contact between your hands and your eyes, nose, and mouth until you can wash or sanitize them, that will help cut down on a lot of transmission.”


How to Avoid Germs While Traveling, According to Experts

Before you board a plane or book a hotel room, consider these health hacks to prevent sickness.

What you pack and how you prepare can help keep harmful bacteria at bay when traveling.

Whether you’re on your way to Hawaii to relax on the beach or heading to Beijing for work, traveling can be stressful. The last thing you want to worry about is getting sick. Unfortunately, there are germs lurking on every door handle, tray table, and restaurant menu.

According to one study published in August 2018 in the journal BMC Infectious Diseases, which was conducted at the Helsinki-Vantaa airport in Finland, the plastic trays at the security checkpoint were crawling with more germs than even the bathroom doorknobs and toilet flush buttons.

The list of disease-causing bacteria found on surfaces like hotel bathroom countertops and subway poles can sound terrifying: staphylococcus, Bacillus spp, E. coli, and even drug-resistant organisms. It’s true, things that get touched by a lot of people are gross, and the germs left behind can be harmful. But there are actions you can take to increase your chances of having a healthy trip.

“You can’t always ‘not touch’ things,” says John Gobbels, a former flight nurse and paramedic, and chief operating officer of MedjetAssist, a company that specializes in medical transports and travel safety. “But if you avoid contact between your hands and your eyes, nose, and mouth until you can wash or sanitize them, that will help cut down on a lot of transmission.”