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Orange Juice Tzimmes recipe

Orange Juice Tzimmes recipe


  • Recipes
  • Dish type
  • Side dish
  • Vegetable side dishes

Stewed carrots and prunes, sweetened with sugar and orange juice.

Ellen Finkelstein

12 people made this

IngredientsServes: 6

  • 8 large carrots
  • 175g (6oz) prunes
  • 475ml (16 fl oz) orange juice
  • 5 tablespoons caster sugar
  • 4 tablespoons butter, melted
  • 1 teaspoon grated lemon zest
  • 1/2 teaspoon grated fresh root ginger

MethodPrep:10min ›Cook:1hr5min ›Ready in:1hr15min

  1. Place carrot and prunes in a pot. Cover the vegetables with orange juice. Bring the mixture to the boil and let it boil 10 minutes.
  2. Stir in sugar and butter. Simmer gently for 1 hour or until the liquid is almost absorbed.
  3. Sprinkle over lemon zest and ginger and let simmer another 5 minutes.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(18)

Reviews in English (12)

Made this for a Rosh Hashana dinner I'm going to tonight - yummy, but VERY sweet....-09 Sep 2010

by Grapefruit Girl

I made so many changes I wasn't sure whether to write a review or a new recipe! First, I used fresh orange juice and plenty of orange zest. I replaced the prunes with dried apricots, halved the butter, and added honey. Tasted very good and orange-y.-30 Sep 2008


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Recipe Collection

Related: Chanukah, Europe, gluten-free, kid-friendly, pareve, Passover, Rosh Hashanah, Shabbat, Sukkot, vegetables & legumes, vegetarian, Yom Kippur

Prep time: 10–15 minutes

Cook time: 40–45 minutes

Yield: 8 servings

User Rating:

I developed this recipe for Beaver Creek WinterFest. We were serving buffalo, and I remembered the first time I had had tzimmes at a restaurant in DC years before. It was a simple dish—dates with sweet potatoes and the carrots—and I thought, Oh, I’ve never had this before and people said, “That’s tzimmes.” It was a bit like the glazed carrots that we used to have growing up, but my grandmother would put lemon juice in there so it was sweet, sour and kind of sticky.

Fast-forward to finding out about this bison/buffalo—I thought it would be great with something that has beautiful roasted carrots and parsnips and the tanginess of orange juice and then the dates. Plus, we used baby carrots and different color baby carrots and parsnips so we had purple, orange and white, and then we had a beautiful glaze with the dates. I like the balance between sweet and tangy, but visually its beautiful, too.

You can serve my tzimmes with roasted chicken or meat. It’s even good at room temperature. I would love it for a picnic. It would be great with greens, too (we served it with creamed kale).


Tzimmes

A traditional Rosh Hashanah dish, Tzimmes is a combination of fruits and vegetables with or without meat, flavored with honey and cinnamon.

Yields

Ingredients

Cooking spray 1 pound sweet potatoes, peeled, halved lengthwise, cut to fit feed tube 1 pound baby carrots 1 cup dried apples 1 cup dried plums 1 cup dried apricots 1 cup golden raisins ½ cup orange juice, room temperature ½ cup apple juice, room temperature 2 tablespoons unsalted butter or margarine, melted 2 tablespoons honey 1 tablespoon brown sugar 1 teaspoon kosher salt ½ teaspoon cinnamon

Nutritional information

Calories 234 (8% from fat) &bull carb. 55g &bull pro. 3g &bull fat 2g &bull sat. fat 1g &bull chol. 5mg &bull sod. 148mg &bull calc. 40mg &bull fiber g

Instructions

Preheat oven to 375°F. Lightly coat a 2½ quart baking dish with cooking spray. Lightly spray one side of a piece of aluminum foil cut to cover dish with cooking spray. Insert 4-mm slicing blade in a Cuisinart® Prep 11 Plus Food Processor. Arrange the sweet potatoes upright in the large feed tube. Use firm pressure to slice. (Slices will look like half moons.) Repeat until all of the sweet potatoes are sliced. Remove to a large mixing bowl. Stir in carrots, apples, apricots, plums and raisins. Insert metal blade in Cuisinart® Prep 11 Plus&trade Food Processor. Place orange and apple juices, melted butter, honey, brown sugar, salt, and cinnamon in work bowl. Process to blend, 15 seconds. Pour over vegetable and fruit mixture stir to blend. Transfer the fruit and vegetable mixture to the prepared baking dish. Spoon all liquid over top. Cover with foil. Stir Tzimmes once or twice while baking. Bake until all vegetables are tender, about 60 minutes. Remove foil cover and bake for an additional 10 to 15 minutes to thicken juices. Serve hot.


Rosh Hashanah Recipes: Carrot Tzimmes

Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish new year holiday begins at sundown on September 13. One of my favorite holidays to cook for, Rosh Hashanah is a joyous occasion and the holiday meals are festive. Traditional Rosh Hashanah foods are often sweet to express our wish for a sweet new year or round to symbolize the circle of life in which one year ends and another begins.

All this week, I will be sharing some old and new Rosh Hashanah recipes to help you plan your holiday meal. Today’s Rosh Hashanah dish is both sweet and round and features a seasonal vegetable, carrots.

Every year on Rosh Hashanah, I make Carrot Tzimmes, a sweet, honey-scented side dish in which carrots are cut into rounds to resemble gold coins — eating these carrot “coins” on Rosh Hashanah is said to ensure a prosperous New Year. I do not know how effective that is, but at a minimum, this dish is guaranteed to deliver Vitamin A to your children. Kids, even picky ones, love the sweet taste and the not-too-crunchy, not-too-mushy texture of the carrots. Plus if you tell them about the gold coin idea, they like it even more. Maybe you could offer a reward for cleaning their plates!

When making this dish, buy the bunches of carrots with the green tops still on. I read in one of the Barefoot Contessa cookbooks years ago that these carrots are the most flavorful, and I agree. Even better, buy some of the pretty heirloom carrot varieties at your local farmers’ market.

Given how quickly this dish comes together, you should not wait for Rosh Hashanah to make it. Now that carrots are in season and especially flavorful, you should add this healthy and kid-friendly side dish to your regular rotation.


Traditional Tzimmes

Total Time 1 hour 10 minutes

Ingredients

  • 9 medium carrots peeled
  • 4 sweet potatoes
  • 1 cup pitted prunes
  • 1 cup dried apricots
  • 2 tbsp fresh lemon juice
  • 1/3 cup fresh orange juice
  • 1/4 cup honey
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 2 1/2 tsp orange zest
  • 1/4 tsp Kosher salt

Instructions

Recipe Notes

  • This makes for a lovely root vegetable side dish, but add brisket, chicken or turkey for a main course meal.
  • After baking, ensure all your vegetables are well cooked. If your carrots are still hard, bake for a bit longer.

…The Backstory continues: I’ve always thought that, as Jews, we are lucky, as we are blessed with two New Year’s. Every December 31, I make a list of resolutions that I don’t often abide by (Exercise, Shmexercise), but Rosh Hashanah gives us that second chance. This time of year is one to take a break, reflect and align one’s path and priorities. Another opportunity for a sweet, prosperous and healthy year.

Aside from the much-loved apples and honey, this hearty and honeyed Tzimmes is just as comforting as the notion of Rosh Hashanah. That said, this sweet stew can be cooked anytime of year – some people serve Tzimmes over Hanukkah and Passover.

The Yiddish term, Tzimmes, is derived from words (tzim + esn) that more or less means “for eating”. While that goes without saying, this recipe yields a substantial amount, so you may be eating it for days. Feel free to halve or double the ingredients, depending on the number of people for which you’re catering.


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Carrot Tzimmes for Rosh Hashanah

Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish new year holiday begins at sundown on September 24. One of my favorite holidays to cook for, Rosh Hashanah is a joyous occasion and the holiday meals are festive. As I explained in my earlier posts, traditional Rosh Hashanah foods are often sweet – to express our wish for a sweet new year – or round to symbolize the circle of life in which one year ends and another begins. Today’s Rosh Hashanah dish is both sweet and round and features a seasonal vegetable, carrots.

Every year on Rosh Hashanah, I make Carrot Tzimmes, a sweet, honey-scented side dish in which carrots are cut into rounds to resemble gold coins — eating these carrot “coins” on Rosh Hashanah is said to ensure a prosperous New Year. I do not know how effective that is, but at a minimum, this dish is guaranteed to deliver Vitamin A to your children. Kids, even picky ones, love the sweet taste and the not-too-crunchy, not-too-mushy texture of the carrots. Plus if you tell them about the gold coin idea, they like it even more. Maybe you could offer a reward for cleaning their plates!

When making this dish, buy the bunches of carrots with the green tops still on. I read in one of the Barefoot Contessa cookbooks years ago that these carrots are the most flavorful, and I agree. Even better, buy some of the pretty heirloom carrot varieties at your local farmers’ market.

Given how quickly this dish comes together, you should not wait for Rosh Hashanah to make it. Now that carrots are in season and especially flavorful, you should add this healthy and kid-friendly side dish to your regular rotation.


  • 1 Pound carrots, peeled and sliced thin
  • 1 Teaspoon cooking oil
  • 1/2 white onion
  • 1/2 Cup water
  • 1 Cup Granny Smith apple
  • 1/4 Cup honey
  • 1/4 Cup dried mixed fruit (raisins, cherries, and currants)
  • 1 Tablespoon orange juice
  • 1 Tablespoon butter or margarine (optional)
  • Salt and pepper

Heat oil in a saucepan and sauté onions until translucent. Add carrots and water and simmer until carrots are tender. Transfer carrots and onions to a plate, keeping the liquid in the pan.

Add the apple, honey, dried fruit, orange juice, and butter (optional) to the pan. Sauté over low heat until the fruit has reconstituted and is plump.


Carrot Tzimmes with Dumplings

When I was young, I loved Mrs. Adler’s jarred carrot tzimmes. I created this recipe in Texas when it was no longer available. It’s great for Passover too!

This is also a favorite Ashkenazic dish for Rosh HaShanah. The Yiddish word for carrot is mehren, which also means "increase," and a ccording to The Rosh Hashanah Anth ology t he eating of carrot tzimmes is accompanied by the expression: "May it be Thy will that our merits will be increased." Carrots were also cooked whole and then sliced into circles, resembling coins in color and shape. This patently added to a yearning for a prosperous new year.

  1. Make matzah ball mixture according to your favorite recipe. Use part of the mixture to make miniature balls by shaping 1/2 teaspoon of dough into a ball in your oiled hands and adding it to the boiling water. Cook and reserve matzah balls for later.
  2. Place sliced cooked carrots, stock, orange juice, ginger, and honey in a saucepan and heat to boiling.
  3. Reduce heat and add margarine.
  4. Give potato starch mixture a stir to recombine and add to the carrots. Stir constantly until mixture thickens.
  5. When mixture has thickened, add the reserved matzah balls and gently combine until the dumplings are coated and heated through.
  • If you want to make a portion of carrots look larger, slice them on the diagonal.
  • Always stir a hot mixture as you add a potato starch/water mixture to it. Potato starch will congeal instantly if not stirred rapidly.
  • An easy way to make little matzah balls is to put the mixture in a pastry bag fitted with a number-6 tip. Squeeze out 1/2 inch of dough and cut it off with a knife over the pot of boiling water.

This recipe is featured in Tina Wasserman's cookbook, Entree to Judaism: A Culinary Exploration of the Jewish Diaspora. "In Tina's recipes each ingredient tells a story. Each recipe expresses an ethical value, explores an historical event, evokes a memory." - Rabbi Debra Robbins, Temple Emanu-El, Dallas, TX


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