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Prune loaf cake recipe

Prune loaf cake recipe


  • Recipes
  • Dish type
  • Cake
  • Cakes with fruit
  • Plum cake

This prune loaf cake is rustic, moist and full of flavour. Perfect sliced and served with afternoon tea.

64 people made this

IngredientsServes: 8

  • 120g butter
  • 160g soft brown sugar
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 tablespoons milk
  • 300g dried pitted prunes, chopped
  • 230g plain flour, sifted
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

MethodPrep:10min ›Cook:1hr30min ›Extra time:1hr cooling › Ready in:2hr40min

  1. Preheat the oven to 180 C / Gas 4. Grease a 900g loaf tin and line with baking parchment.
  2. Cream the butter and sugar together until light and fluffy. Add the eggs and vanilla extract and beat well. Beat in the milk and then add the prunes. Fold in the flour, baking powder and spices. Spoon into the loaf tin and smooth the top.
  3. Bake in the preheated oven for 40 to 50 minutes, or until a skewer inserted into the centre comes out clean. Remove from the oven and allow to cool for 1 hour before slicing and serving.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(1)

Reviews in English (1)

I used half the amount of prunes stated, and I used "ready to eat" prunes too. The cake was cooked and starting to burn on the edges after 40 mins. I have a fan oven and had the temp as 170c. Nice cake though, after all the chocolate at Christmas.-05 Jan 2014


Recipe Summary

  • Unsalted butter, room temperature, for pan
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour (spooned and leveled), plus more for pan
  • 1 cup pitted prunes (dried plums)
  • 2 cups granulated sugar
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 cup vegetable oil
  • 1 cup low-fat buttermilk
  • 3 large eggs
  • 1 cup coarsely chopped walnuts
  • Confectioners’ sugar, for dusting (optional)

Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Butter and flour a nonstick Bundt pan (12-cup capacity), tapping out excess flour set aside.

Bring a small saucepan of water to a boil remove from heat, and add prunes. Cover, and let soak 10 minutes. Drain prunes and finely chop set aside.

Meanwhile, in a large bowl, whisk together flour, granulated sugar, cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, salt, and baking soda set aside. In a medium bowl, whisk together oil, buttermilk, and eggs. Add oil mixture to flour mixture mix just until combined. Stir in prunes and nuts.

Spoon batter into prepared pan, and bake until a toothpick inserted in center of cake comes out clean and the cake has pulled away completely from sides of the pan, 1 hour and 45 minutes to 2 hours.

Immediately invert onto a cooling rack let cool completely. Dust with confectioners' sugar, if desired.


Cranberry-prune loaf

The sign in the produce section was a shocker. How could it be? “Sorry. Out of cranberries.” I leaned on my cart, incredulous, caught unaware by the cranberry shortage.

It was the day before Thanksgiving. I don’t remember the year -- sometime in the early ‘90s. I was on my last swing through the grocery store. Although each of the guests at my 24-person dinner would bring a dish, there were dozens of little things my husband and I still needed, from pickles to cranberries.

We needed lots of cranberries. With so many people, we always served at least three kinds of sauce or relish. Not to mention the cranberries I’d need for dessert -- cranberry-apple pie. In a cranberry panic, I ran from store to store trying to find enough for our feast. Some stores were out, others had imposed a limit: “one per customer.”

Somehow we made it. But every autumn since, as soon as the first cranberries appear in the grocery stores, I grab three bags. If I’m not ready to use them, I toss them in the freezer.

My hoarding tendencies reemerge annually not just because cranberries are traditional (we could do without candied yams, for example, if there should be a sudden yam blight) but because I’m crazy about them.

Cranberries taste like they look. Tart and tangy, they don’t taste blue or purple, and they’re not at all pink on the palate like a tropical fruit. Their flavor, like their color, is saturated, intense.

And that beyond-citrus intensity is essential this time of year. The rich, creamy foods that rule our tables cry out for touches of spice and piquancy.

As a sweet but assertive, fruity complement to savory dishes, especially those with early American roots -- game birds and poultry, wild rice, corn bread, sausage, apples -- cranberries can’t be beat.

Fresh cranberry relish is most often made with orange zest, and while that pairing is appealing, lemon is even better, more unexpected and almost startling.

A batch of cranberry-lemon relish with dried fig takes almost no time to make and greets your mouth with a wow-I’m-alive! tartness and crunch, then goes a step further and gives you a sweet, figgy finish.

Dried cranberries are as easy to find as raisins these days. Bakers use them as raisin substitutes in scones and muffins, but fresh cranberries are a much more exciting addition.

Although they blend in deliciously when sweetened, they never lose their tartness, and if used generously, they bring sophistication to even the homiest comfort-food recipes.

Take cranberry upside-down cake. It’s easy to put together for a family dinner, and served warm from the oven, the cake layer is rich, buttery and nutmeg-scented. The topping of brown sugar-sweetened cranberries, though, is what gives it zing.

The fruits formerly known as prunes (now grandly renamed dried plums) are rarely combined with cranberries, but when they are, in a fruitcake with almonds, the effect is delightful.

The loaf is dense with fruit and nuts, which will please fruitcake traditionalists, but the cranberries make it so sprightly that it also appeals to folks who shy away from the sticky-sweet stuff. Orange syrup instead of brandy as a soaking liquid makes for a light but moist and flavorful cake.

This loaf can be made using frozen cranberries. You don’t need to thaw them just rinse and toss them in with the other ingredients. It’s a great recipe for the weeks between Thanksgiving and Christmas, when nervous cranberry lovers like me can finally be profligate with our stashes.


Iny&rsquos Prune Cake

Cover prunes with water. Bring to a boil and cook until soft and mashable, about eight minutes. Remove from heat, drain water, and mash on a plate. Set aside.

Mix together oil, sugar, and eggs. In a separate bowl, sift together dry ingredients. Combine wet and dry ingredients, add buttermilk and vanilla and stir gently until just combined. Throw in the mashed prunes and stir gently to combine. DO NOT OVERMIX!

Pour batter into buttered baking dish (9 x 13 or so) and bake for 35 to 40 minutes. DO NOT OVERBAKE OR INY WILL PADDLE YOUR BOTTOM.

While cake has five minutes remaining, make the icing:
Combine all icing ingredients in a medium saucepan over medium heat and bring to a slow boil. Boil without stirring for 5 to 7 minutes, or until icing starts to turn dark. Do NOT allow icing to reach soft ball stage icing should be caramel in color, but not sticky like caramel. Icing should be easily pourable.

Remove cake from oven and pour on icing immediately.
Allow to rest on the counter. Serve warm.

NOTE: There is absolutely zero &ldquoprune effect&rdquo associated with this cake. The end.

I was fortunate enough to happen upon this recipe for my great-grandmother Iny&rsquos Prune Cake a few years ago. Written by her frail, small hands, the recipe&rsquos simplicity appealed to me, and I rushed out to buy the ingredients and prepared it the same day. &ldquoMarlboro Man will never eat this,&rdquo I thought, as I mashed up the cooked prunes according to Iny&rsquos instructions. Anything with the word &ldquoprune&rdquo in it, I reasoned, would be instantly marked off the list.

Marlboro Man returned from working cattle a little while later and noticed the warm cake sitting on the kitchen counter. Before I had a chance to tell him the name of it, he cut himself a big piece and gobbled it up. Then he gobbled up another piece. Then he had more for dessert that night.
Since then, I&rsquove made this cake over a dozen times, and have never let my dear husband in on the ingredients. And today, I&rsquom tired of living that lie.

Honey, it&rsquos me. That delicious, gooey coffee cake I make for you so often? The one you gobble up in seconds? It&rsquos called Prune Cake. Please forgive me.


&ldquoHearts and Minds&rdquo Chocolate-Prune Cake

Unsalted butter, for greasing the pan

½ cup good-quality Dutch-process cocoa powder, such as Guittard, plus more for dusting the pan

5 ounces milk or semisweet chocolate, finely chopped

15 dried pitted prunes

10 tablespoons buttermilk

½ cup canola oil

½ cup sugar

½ cup light brown sugar

2 large eggs

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 cup all-purpose flour

1 teaspoon baking powder

½ teaspoon kosher salt

¼ teaspoon baking soda

Instructions: Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and arrange a rack in the center. Grease a n 8½-by-4½-inch loaf pan with butter and dust with cocoa powder.

In a small saucepan, add about an inch of water and bring to a simmer . Put half of the chopped chocolate in a small heatproof bowl and set the bowl over the simmering water, making sure the bottom of the bowl does not touch the water. Let stand until the chocolate has melted, then stir until smooth. Keep warm . Put the prunes in a bowl and pour simmering water from the saucepan over the prunes to cover let stand 10 minutes.

In a large bowl whisk together the buttermilk, canola oil, sugars, eggs and vanilla. In a separate medium bowl, sift together the flour, cocoa powder , baking powder, salt and baking soda.

Remove the prunes from the water and finely chop. Stir the dry ingredients into the wet, mixing until smooth, then stir in the melted chocolate. Add the remaining chopped chocolate and the prunes and stir to combine. Transfer the batter to the prepared pan and bake on a rack in the center of the oven until puffed and cracked on top and a toothpick inserted in the center comes out with a few moist crumbs clinging to it, about 40 to 45 minutes.

Let cool on a wire rack, then turn out of the pan and let cool completely. Cut into fat slices and serve.


  • 250g/9oz plain flour
  • 1 tbsp baking powder
  • 150g/5½oz soft goat’s cheese, cut into small pieces
  • 80g/2¾oz pistachios, roughly chopped
  • 100g/3½oz prunes, roughly chopped
  • 4 free-range eggs
  • 150ml/5fl oz olive oil
  • 100ml/3½fl oz milk
  • 50g/1¾oz plain yoghurt
  • 1 tsp salt
  • pinch freshly-ground black pepper

Preheat the oven to 180C/350F/Gas 4 and line a loaf tin measuring 22x11cm/8½x4¼in across the top and 6cm/2½in deep with baking paper.

In a bowl, mix together the flour, baking powder, goat’s cheese, pistachios and prunes.

In a separate bowl, whisk the eggs until fluffy and pale in colour. Then gradually whisk in the oil, milk and yoghurt. Season with the salt and freshly-ground black pepper.

Fold the flour mixture into the whisked eggs. Try not to overbeat as this will make the end result tough (it’s better to undermix).

Pour the batter into the prepared tin.

Bake for 30-40 minutes or until a metal skewer inserted in the centre of the cake comes out clean.

Recipe Tips

Use a rubber spatula rather than a whisk to prevent overbeating the flour.


Orange Prune Loaf is an orange flavored sweet bread. This Orange Prune Loaf is truly scrumptious, and full of orange juice and zest. Adding prune gives this bread a nice texture and flavor.

Let’s learn to make Orange Prune Loaf in 6 easy to understand quick steps.

For Orange Loaf:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees Celsius). Line or grease the mini baking pan with parchment paper and set aside. In a large mixing bowl beat together egg, orange juice, sugar, vanilla extract, and margarine. Add flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, prunes, and orange zest. Stir well until moistened.

Once you get a smooth mixture, pour this mixture into greased/lined baking pan. Bake at 350 degrees F (175 degrees C) for 55-60 minutes, or until loaf turns brown. Once it is baked, remove loaf from oven, but not from pan. Let it cool down on cooling rack for 10 minutes.

For Glaze:

Combine all glaze ingredients until you get the desired drizzling consistency, and then pour it over the loaf.

For Serving:

Remove the baking parchment from the loaf and spoon glaze over loaf. Garnish with orange slices and dried prunes. Let stand in pan for 10 minutes before slicing and serving.


Spiced Prune Snack Cake

To make the prune puree, pour the boiling water over the prunes and soak for 15 minutes.

Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 350 ° F. Line a 9″ bread pan with parchment then lightly spray with cooking spray and set aside.

After the prunes have soaked, reserve one tablespoon of the soaking liquid and drain the rest. Use a fork to mash the prunes and the 1 tablespoon of soaking liquid into a paste with no big chunks remaining.

In a mixing bowl combine the prune puree, melted butter, dark brown sugar, yolks, orange zest, and vanilla extract. Whisk until combined.

Sprinkle the flour, ginger, allspice, salt, and baking powder over the mixture then stir to combine.

Spread the batter into th e prepared loaf pan, sprinkle the walnuts and candied ginger over the top.

Bake for 25 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean. Cool in the pan on a wire rack for 10 minutes then remove the cake from the pan and slice to serve.


Ingredients & Method

  • 75g unsalted butter, plus extra for greasing
  • 3 tablespoons rolled oats
  • 125g golden syrup
  • 1 tablespoon malt extract
  • 75ml pale ale, such as St Peters Golden Ale
  • 100g plain wholemeal flour
  • 250g strong white bread flour
  • a large pinch of table salt
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon ground mixed spice
  • 150g ready-to-eat dried prunes, chopped
  • 1 medium egg, lightly beaten

Preheat the oven to 180°C/Gas mark 4. Grease a 900g loaf tin with butter and dust it with half of the rolled oats.

Place the butter, golden syrup and malt extract in a small saucepan over a medium heat until melted and combined, then remove from the heat and whisk in the ale. Set aside to cool for 10 minutes.

Place the flours, salt, baking powder, mixed spice and prunes in a mixing bowl. Add the egg and the melted mixture, then stir together until just combined (don’t overwork the mixture). Transfer the mixture to the prepared loaf tin, levelling the surface, then sprinkle the rest of the oats evenly over the top.

Bake in the oven for 40–45 minutes or until risen and deep golden brown. Insert a metal skewer in the centre and if it comes out clean then the loaf is cooked if not, return the loaf to the oven for a few more minutes until cooked.

Remove from the oven and leave the loaf to cool in the tin for 10 minutes, then turn it out onto a wire rack and leave to cool completely. Serve in slices with butter. Alternatively, lightly toast the slices, spread with butter and lightly sprinkle with a pinch of sea salt. Delicious!

To store, wrap the cold loaf in foil or non-stick baking paper and keep in an airtight container for up to 5 days. This loaf also freezes well for up to 1 month simply defrost at room temperature overnight before serving.

Sultanas or chopped dried stoned dates instead of prunes also work really well in this recipe. Once the butter mixture is melted and the ale is added, stir in the fruit and leave to stand and cool for 10 minutes, then continue with the recipe as above.


Preparation

Step 1

Cover prunes with water. Bring to a boil and cook until soft and mashable, about eight minutes. Remove from heat, drain water, and mash on a plate. Set aside.
NOTE: I cooked mine in the microwave, and it worked.

Mix together oil, sugar, and eggs. In a separate bowl, sift together dry ingredients. Combine wet and dry ingredients, add buttermilk and vanilla and stir gently until just combined. Throw in the mashed prunes and stir gently to combine. DO NOT OVERMIX!

Pour batter into buttered baking dish (9 x 13 or so) and bake for 35 to 40 minutes. DO NOT OVER BAKE.

While cake has five minutes remaining, make the icing.

Combine all icing ingredients in a medium saucepan over medium heat and bring to a slow boil. Boil without stirring for 5 to 7 minutes, or until icing starts to turn dark. (about 220°F worked for me).

Do NOT allow icing to reach soft ball stage icing should be caramel in color, but not sticky like caramel. Icing should be easily pourable.

Remove cake from oven and pour on icing immediately. Allow to rest on the counter. Serve warm.