New recipes

Kir Royale

Kir Royale


1/2

ounce Chambord™ liqueur

Hide Images

  • 1

    Pour the Chambord™ into a champagne glass.

Nutrition Facts

Serving Size: 1 Serving
Calories
180
Calories from Fat
0
% Daily Value
Total Fat
0g
0%
Saturated Fat
0g
0%
Trans Fat
0g
Cholesterol
0mg
0%
Sodium
10mg
0%
Potassium
120mg
3%
Total Carbohydrate
9g
3%
Dietary Fiber
0g
0%
Sugars
4g
Protein
0g
Vitamin A
0%
0%
Vitamin C
0%
0%
Calcium
0%
0%
Iron
2%
2%
Exchanges:

0 Starch; 0 Fruit; 0 Other Carbohydrate; 0 Skim Milk; 0 Low-Fat Milk; 0 Milk; 0 Vegetable; 0 Very Lean Meat; 0 Lean Meat; 0 High-Fat Meat; 0 Fat;

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

More About This Recipe

  • A touch of Chambord™ adds a hint of berry flavor to your favorite bubbly.

    It’s Tuesday evening. Just another day in another week with nothing special going on.

    Until you bust out the champagne, that is!

    Nothing makes the week a little more bearable like a glass of bubbly.

    Class it up even more with a hit of Chambord™, a liqueur made from red and black raspberries.

    This classy cocktail just takes two ingredients and is sure to spice up an otherwise boring evening.

    Pour in your Chambord™ and top it off with some sweet bubbly.

    The result is an exquisitely fizzy drink that’s perfectly sweet and tart.


Ready to mix things up a bit? Here are some of the most popular variations of the classic Kir Royale.

Kir Imperial - Use a raspberry liquor, such as Chambord, in place of the Creme de Cassis.

Cider Royale - Substitute a hard cider in place of the champagne, and add a dash of calvados.

Cardinal- Use a red wine in place of the traditional white champagne.

Tarantino - Substitute a light beer for the champagne.

Hibiscus Royale- Replace the creme de cassis with a mix of peach and raspberry liquer, and a bit of hibiscus flower.

Kir Bianco - Substitute sweet white vermouth in place of the champagne.

Pink Russian -This variation uses milk instead of champagne. And I honestly have no idea why you would do that.


Kir Royale

Jump to Recipe LADY DES VŒUX French 75

This recipe may contain affiliate links. If you purchase through the links it allows the site to make money at no additional cost to you. For more information please see Cooking To Entertain’s Policy page.

Like this:

Related Posts

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

About Me!

Hey everyone! I'm Cody. Great to see you enjoying my recipes and food travel posts. Hope you are enjoying your time here, and if you want to learn more about me click my pic and it'll shoot you right over to the About page.


Toast to Valentine's Day With This Special Kir Royale Recipe

Whether you're trying to woo that special somone or hosting a night in with the girls, toast your guest(s) with a chic kir royale. Unlike the kir, which is made with white wine, the kir royale creates a delicious rendezvous between sparkling wine (or better yet Champagne) and black currant liqueur. Hillary Kerr, co-founder of Who What Wear, Domaine, and Byrdie Beauty enjoyed a #thirstythursday night out in Los Angeles with one of these chic cocktails&mdashor two&mdashin honor of Valentine's Day.

Whip up a romantic elixir for two&mdashor more:

6 ounces Champagne or sparkling wine

½ ounce crème de cassis (black currant liqueur)

Lemon twist, raspberries, or cranberries for garnish

Pour the crème de cassis into a flute, then add the Champagne or sparkling wine. Garnish with a lemon twist, a few raspberries, or a couple of cranberries.

Tell us: What's on your Valentine menu?

Up Next: 5 Pink Victorian Houses To Fall In Love With This Valentine' Day


Kir and Kir Royale Chambord (Apéritif Recipe)

Walk into any restaurant or brasserie in France and you will see it on the menu: Kir. It is usually under apéritifs, and is a recipe mix of crème de cassis (blackcurrant liqueur) topped up with a white wine from Burgundy, such as Chablis or Aligoté. And there is the luxuriously sounding Kir Royale, with champagne. Yum!

Served chilled, a kir is usually a bit sweet and wonderfully refreshing. In France, where the main meal is usually only accompanied by wine and water, a kir is the quintessential apéritif, meant to be indulged in along with an appetizer or starter. A typical French meal can be quite long so strap on a seatbelt, the kir is just the start.

It originally used to be called blanc-cassis (meaning white-cassis) but it is now named after a man named Félix Kir, who was the mayor of Dijon in Burgundy. The story goes that after WWII and the German Army&rsquos confiscation of all the local red wines, Mr. Kir decided to substitute white wines into another drink to make use of the excessive amounts of white wine available.

The Burgundy region is more famous for its red wines than its whites, so it is also possible that Mr. Kir decided to combine the local white wines with crème de cassis to disguise the harvest inferiority.

Whatever his motivation, kir has now become an apéro mainstay in France, along with the southern inspired Pastis de Marseille.


Preparation

Step 1

Pour 1 tsp. crème de cassis into a Champagne flute and top with Champagne or sparkling wine.

Step 2

You’ll need 1 small bottle of crème de cassis (it will serve 10–30 people) and 2 bottles chilled Champagne for 10 drinks, 4 bottles for 20, and 6 bottles for 30.

How would you rate Kir Royale?

Recipes you want to make. Cooking advice that works. Restaurant recommendations you trust.

© 2021 Condé Nast. All rights reserved. Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement and Privacy Policy and Cookie Statement and Your California Privacy Rights. Bon Appétit may earn a portion of sales from products that are purchased through our site as part of our Affiliate Partnerships with retailers. The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of Condé Nast. Ad Choices


Some Kir Royale variations for you:

  • If you use a sparkling wine other than Champagne, it’s called a Kir Pétillant.
  • If you use still white wine instead of sparkling, the drink is called, simply, a Kir.
  • If you use Chambord, a French black raspberry liqueur, then it’s called a Kir Impérial or French Kir Royale or Chambord Kir Royale.
  • Some people use a non-alcoholic black currant syrup instead of the creme de cassis. I don’t recommend it. At all. Especially if your syrup of choice is Ribena.
  • A Cider Royale uses hard apple cider instead of wine. A splash of calvados (apple brandy) is also usually in there.
  • Oddly, it’s a Tarantino if you make it with a light beer (lager) instead of wine. Or you can call it a Kir-Beer. (Two Tarantino references in one blog post? How does that happen. )
  • Oh, and a Pink Russian uses milk instead of wine. Geez.

I think I’m going to stick with the Royale!


The drink lends itself to several variations including some local interpretations:

  • Kir – made with Crème de Cassis and white wine
  • Kir Royale – made with Crème de Cassis and Champagne
  • Kir Pétillant – made with a sparkling wine such as Crémant de Bourgogne
  • Kir Imperial – made with raspberry liqueur instead of Crème de Cassis and Champagne
  • Cardinal or Communard – made with red wine instead of white wine
  • Kir Pêche – made with peach liqueur
  • Kir Breton – made with cider from Brittany
  • Kir Normand – made with cider from Normandy

A good Kir or Kir Royale should not be overly sweet. The role of the dry wine or Champagne is to balance the sweetness with acidity and deliver an elegant and balanced aperitif.


To Make The Kir Royale Cocktail: Add Champagne to a Champagne flute then add the creme de mure or creme de cassis and stir. Put a toothpick through a few slices of folded plum, place on the edge of the flute, and serve.

Footnotes

Connect With Salt & Wind Travel

  • Explore The Salt & Wind Travel Services
  • Join Our Virtual Cooking Club
  • Shop Our Store For Cooking And Travel Inspo
  • Have Us Craft You A Custom Travel Itinerary
  • Download Our Digital Travel Guides For Food Lovers
  • Sign Up For Our Newsletter

More France On Salt & Wind Travel

Team Salt & Wind Travel

Salt & Wind Travel is a boutique travel company for the discerning food and lifestyle traveler. Through our food-first travel planning services, including private day tours, custom itinerary planning, small group trips, and our Digital City Guides For Food Lovers, we provide you with the resources to travel in good taste. Founded by food and travel expert, Aida Mollenkamp in 2015, Salt & Wind Travel is owned by Aida and filmmaker and travel expert, Kristen Kellogg.


Ready to mix things up a bit? Here are some of the most popular variations of the classic Kir Royale.

Kir Imperial - Use a raspberry liquor, such as Chambord, in place of the Creme de Cassis.

Cider Royale - Substitute a hard cider in place of the champagne, and add a dash of calvados.

Cardinal- Use a red wine in place of the traditional white champagne.

Tarantino - Substitute a light beer for the champagne.

Hibiscus Royale- Replace the creme de cassis with a mix of peach and raspberry liquer, and a bit of hibiscus flower.

Kir Bianco - Substitute sweet white vermouth in place of the champagne.

Pink Russian -This variation uses milk instead of champagne. And I honestly have no idea why you would do that.


Frequently asked questions:

A French cocktail recipe made with sparkling, dry white wine and blackberry liqueur. It’s a variation on Kir, a popular French cocktail made with white wine and creme de cassis (black currant liqueur.)

Since the bubbles in sparkling wine fizz out once poured, I don’t recommend pouring this cocktail until you’re ready to enjoy. To keep fresh and chilled, store the sparkling wine in the refrigerator until you’re ready to serve.


Watch the video: Master Your Glass! Kir VS. Kir Royale