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The Hello Kitty Spam Kit is Back to Make Your Precooked Meat Look Better Than Ever

The Hello Kitty Spam Kit is Back to Make Your Precooked Meat Look Better Than Ever


This kit will make your Spam too cute to want to eat

The salty meat has never looked sweeter.

Leave it to Sanrio, the parent company of Hello Kitty, to make canned precooked meat cute with the restock of the Hello Kitty Spam Musubi Kit.

This kit allows you to make your own Hello Kitty-shaped Spam Musubi, a popular Hawaiian snack consisting of a slice of Spam on shaped rice, in a matter of minutes.

To make the snack, you fill the Hello Kitty head mold with rice, and then attach the head to a piece of Spam.

You can use strips of nori to make whiskers and eyes, a piece of bell pepper to make the nose, and either a shaped carrot or red pepper to decorate the Hello Kitty head, according to the Los Angeles Times.

The kit is available online for $20 and comes with a 12-ounce tin of Less Sodium Spam, one Hello Kitty Mold, and one Spam Musubi Mold.

Sanrio didn’t stop at Spam Musubi; just last year, the company also collaborated with an Italian winery for a limited line of Hello Kitty wine.


The Hello Kitty Spam Kit is Back to Make Your Precooked Meat Look Better Than Ever - Recipes

Huh? What? Yeah, that’s what I said when I looked at the label of the three dolls above I had found at the thrift store the other week. McDonald’s gave away almost full size Hello Kitty Dolls? And why were they called “Dear Daniel?” You’ve heard it here first, I never knew the boy Hello Kitty was named Dear Daniel. And if you didn’t either, now you do. Thankfully, there’s a website called, of course, “ihearthellokitty.com” where you can find out about the connection between McDonald’s and Hello Kitty and where I found out more about these dolls:

As previously mentioned, these were third in the series, the first being Hello Kitty x McDonald’s 1999 Love McKitty Plush and the second Hello Kitty x McDonald’s 2000 McSweet Millennium Love Plush, all very cute and super impressive that these were such large dolls in comparison to the usual tiny variety we are offered with our Happy Meal. Apparently they were quite popular at the time, at least in Singapore:

Things are getting out of hand in strait-laced Singapore lately, and it’s all because of Hello Kitty, the round-faced cartoon cat with no mouth. On New Year’s Day, the city-state’s 113 McDonald’s outlets began a six-week promotion that offers customers a different pair of Hello Kitty characters each week when they purchase an Extra Value Meal.

Since then, passionate consumers — mostly teenagers — have stormed the chain’s outlets, offering to pay as much as S$200-$300 (U.S. $119-$179) for each set of the limited-edition dolls, according to Singapore’s the Straits Times. Arguments and fistfights have broken out in the long lines, and on Jan. 13, seven people were injured when a mob pressed against one franchise’s plate-glass door and shattered it.

Though currently their prices don’t seem to be too through the roof, I can only imagine that they will appreciate in value.


The Hello Kitty Spam Kit is Back to Make Your Precooked Meat Look Better Than Ever - Recipes

Huh? What? Yeah, that’s what I said when I looked at the label of the three dolls above I had found at the thrift store the other week. McDonald’s gave away almost full size Hello Kitty Dolls? And why were they called “Dear Daniel?” You’ve heard it here first, I never knew the boy Hello Kitty was named Dear Daniel. And if you didn’t either, now you do. Thankfully, there’s a website called, of course, “ihearthellokitty.com” where you can find out about the connection between McDonald’s and Hello Kitty and where I found out more about these dolls:

As previously mentioned, these were third in the series, the first being Hello Kitty x McDonald’s 1999 Love McKitty Plush and the second Hello Kitty x McDonald’s 2000 McSweet Millennium Love Plush, all very cute and super impressive that these were such large dolls in comparison to the usual tiny variety we are offered with our Happy Meal. Apparently they were quite popular at the time, at least in Singapore:

Things are getting out of hand in strait-laced Singapore lately, and it’s all because of Hello Kitty, the round-faced cartoon cat with no mouth. On New Year’s Day, the city-state’s 113 McDonald’s outlets began a six-week promotion that offers customers a different pair of Hello Kitty characters each week when they purchase an Extra Value Meal.

Since then, passionate consumers — mostly teenagers — have stormed the chain’s outlets, offering to pay as much as S$200-$300 (U.S. $119-$179) for each set of the limited-edition dolls, according to Singapore’s the Straits Times. Arguments and fistfights have broken out in the long lines, and on Jan. 13, seven people were injured when a mob pressed against one franchise’s plate-glass door and shattered it.

Though currently their prices don’t seem to be too through the roof, I can only imagine that they will appreciate in value.


The Hello Kitty Spam Kit is Back to Make Your Precooked Meat Look Better Than Ever - Recipes

Huh? What? Yeah, that’s what I said when I looked at the label of the three dolls above I had found at the thrift store the other week. McDonald’s gave away almost full size Hello Kitty Dolls? And why were they called “Dear Daniel?” You’ve heard it here first, I never knew the boy Hello Kitty was named Dear Daniel. And if you didn’t either, now you do. Thankfully, there’s a website called, of course, “ihearthellokitty.com” where you can find out about the connection between McDonald’s and Hello Kitty and where I found out more about these dolls:

As previously mentioned, these were third in the series, the first being Hello Kitty x McDonald’s 1999 Love McKitty Plush and the second Hello Kitty x McDonald’s 2000 McSweet Millennium Love Plush, all very cute and super impressive that these were such large dolls in comparison to the usual tiny variety we are offered with our Happy Meal. Apparently they were quite popular at the time, at least in Singapore:

Things are getting out of hand in strait-laced Singapore lately, and it’s all because of Hello Kitty, the round-faced cartoon cat with no mouth. On New Year’s Day, the city-state’s 113 McDonald’s outlets began a six-week promotion that offers customers a different pair of Hello Kitty characters each week when they purchase an Extra Value Meal.

Since then, passionate consumers — mostly teenagers — have stormed the chain’s outlets, offering to pay as much as S$200-$300 (U.S. $119-$179) for each set of the limited-edition dolls, according to Singapore’s the Straits Times. Arguments and fistfights have broken out in the long lines, and on Jan. 13, seven people were injured when a mob pressed against one franchise’s plate-glass door and shattered it.

Though currently their prices don’t seem to be too through the roof, I can only imagine that they will appreciate in value.


The Hello Kitty Spam Kit is Back to Make Your Precooked Meat Look Better Than Ever - Recipes

Huh? What? Yeah, that’s what I said when I looked at the label of the three dolls above I had found at the thrift store the other week. McDonald’s gave away almost full size Hello Kitty Dolls? And why were they called “Dear Daniel?” You’ve heard it here first, I never knew the boy Hello Kitty was named Dear Daniel. And if you didn’t either, now you do. Thankfully, there’s a website called, of course, “ihearthellokitty.com” where you can find out about the connection between McDonald’s and Hello Kitty and where I found out more about these dolls:

As previously mentioned, these were third in the series, the first being Hello Kitty x McDonald’s 1999 Love McKitty Plush and the second Hello Kitty x McDonald’s 2000 McSweet Millennium Love Plush, all very cute and super impressive that these were such large dolls in comparison to the usual tiny variety we are offered with our Happy Meal. Apparently they were quite popular at the time, at least in Singapore:

Things are getting out of hand in strait-laced Singapore lately, and it’s all because of Hello Kitty, the round-faced cartoon cat with no mouth. On New Year’s Day, the city-state’s 113 McDonald’s outlets began a six-week promotion that offers customers a different pair of Hello Kitty characters each week when they purchase an Extra Value Meal.

Since then, passionate consumers — mostly teenagers — have stormed the chain’s outlets, offering to pay as much as S$200-$300 (U.S. $119-$179) for each set of the limited-edition dolls, according to Singapore’s the Straits Times. Arguments and fistfights have broken out in the long lines, and on Jan. 13, seven people were injured when a mob pressed against one franchise’s plate-glass door and shattered it.

Though currently their prices don’t seem to be too through the roof, I can only imagine that they will appreciate in value.


The Hello Kitty Spam Kit is Back to Make Your Precooked Meat Look Better Than Ever - Recipes

Huh? What? Yeah, that’s what I said when I looked at the label of the three dolls above I had found at the thrift store the other week. McDonald’s gave away almost full size Hello Kitty Dolls? And why were they called “Dear Daniel?” You’ve heard it here first, I never knew the boy Hello Kitty was named Dear Daniel. And if you didn’t either, now you do. Thankfully, there’s a website called, of course, “ihearthellokitty.com” where you can find out about the connection between McDonald’s and Hello Kitty and where I found out more about these dolls:

As previously mentioned, these were third in the series, the first being Hello Kitty x McDonald’s 1999 Love McKitty Plush and the second Hello Kitty x McDonald’s 2000 McSweet Millennium Love Plush, all very cute and super impressive that these were such large dolls in comparison to the usual tiny variety we are offered with our Happy Meal. Apparently they were quite popular at the time, at least in Singapore:

Things are getting out of hand in strait-laced Singapore lately, and it’s all because of Hello Kitty, the round-faced cartoon cat with no mouth. On New Year’s Day, the city-state’s 113 McDonald’s outlets began a six-week promotion that offers customers a different pair of Hello Kitty characters each week when they purchase an Extra Value Meal.

Since then, passionate consumers — mostly teenagers — have stormed the chain’s outlets, offering to pay as much as S$200-$300 (U.S. $119-$179) for each set of the limited-edition dolls, according to Singapore’s the Straits Times. Arguments and fistfights have broken out in the long lines, and on Jan. 13, seven people were injured when a mob pressed against one franchise’s plate-glass door and shattered it.

Though currently their prices don’t seem to be too through the roof, I can only imagine that they will appreciate in value.


The Hello Kitty Spam Kit is Back to Make Your Precooked Meat Look Better Than Ever - Recipes

Huh? What? Yeah, that’s what I said when I looked at the label of the three dolls above I had found at the thrift store the other week. McDonald’s gave away almost full size Hello Kitty Dolls? And why were they called “Dear Daniel?” You’ve heard it here first, I never knew the boy Hello Kitty was named Dear Daniel. And if you didn’t either, now you do. Thankfully, there’s a website called, of course, “ihearthellokitty.com” where you can find out about the connection between McDonald’s and Hello Kitty and where I found out more about these dolls:

As previously mentioned, these were third in the series, the first being Hello Kitty x McDonald’s 1999 Love McKitty Plush and the second Hello Kitty x McDonald’s 2000 McSweet Millennium Love Plush, all very cute and super impressive that these were such large dolls in comparison to the usual tiny variety we are offered with our Happy Meal. Apparently they were quite popular at the time, at least in Singapore:

Things are getting out of hand in strait-laced Singapore lately, and it’s all because of Hello Kitty, the round-faced cartoon cat with no mouth. On New Year’s Day, the city-state’s 113 McDonald’s outlets began a six-week promotion that offers customers a different pair of Hello Kitty characters each week when they purchase an Extra Value Meal.

Since then, passionate consumers — mostly teenagers — have stormed the chain’s outlets, offering to pay as much as S$200-$300 (U.S. $119-$179) for each set of the limited-edition dolls, according to Singapore’s the Straits Times. Arguments and fistfights have broken out in the long lines, and on Jan. 13, seven people were injured when a mob pressed against one franchise’s plate-glass door and shattered it.

Though currently their prices don’t seem to be too through the roof, I can only imagine that they will appreciate in value.


The Hello Kitty Spam Kit is Back to Make Your Precooked Meat Look Better Than Ever - Recipes

Huh? What? Yeah, that’s what I said when I looked at the label of the three dolls above I had found at the thrift store the other week. McDonald’s gave away almost full size Hello Kitty Dolls? And why were they called “Dear Daniel?” You’ve heard it here first, I never knew the boy Hello Kitty was named Dear Daniel. And if you didn’t either, now you do. Thankfully, there’s a website called, of course, “ihearthellokitty.com” where you can find out about the connection between McDonald’s and Hello Kitty and where I found out more about these dolls:

As previously mentioned, these were third in the series, the first being Hello Kitty x McDonald’s 1999 Love McKitty Plush and the second Hello Kitty x McDonald’s 2000 McSweet Millennium Love Plush, all very cute and super impressive that these were such large dolls in comparison to the usual tiny variety we are offered with our Happy Meal. Apparently they were quite popular at the time, at least in Singapore:

Things are getting out of hand in strait-laced Singapore lately, and it’s all because of Hello Kitty, the round-faced cartoon cat with no mouth. On New Year’s Day, the city-state’s 113 McDonald’s outlets began a six-week promotion that offers customers a different pair of Hello Kitty characters each week when they purchase an Extra Value Meal.

Since then, passionate consumers — mostly teenagers — have stormed the chain’s outlets, offering to pay as much as S$200-$300 (U.S. $119-$179) for each set of the limited-edition dolls, according to Singapore’s the Straits Times. Arguments and fistfights have broken out in the long lines, and on Jan. 13, seven people were injured when a mob pressed against one franchise’s plate-glass door and shattered it.

Though currently their prices don’t seem to be too through the roof, I can only imagine that they will appreciate in value.


The Hello Kitty Spam Kit is Back to Make Your Precooked Meat Look Better Than Ever - Recipes

Huh? What? Yeah, that’s what I said when I looked at the label of the three dolls above I had found at the thrift store the other week. McDonald’s gave away almost full size Hello Kitty Dolls? And why were they called “Dear Daniel?” You’ve heard it here first, I never knew the boy Hello Kitty was named Dear Daniel. And if you didn’t either, now you do. Thankfully, there’s a website called, of course, “ihearthellokitty.com” where you can find out about the connection between McDonald’s and Hello Kitty and where I found out more about these dolls:

As previously mentioned, these were third in the series, the first being Hello Kitty x McDonald’s 1999 Love McKitty Plush and the second Hello Kitty x McDonald’s 2000 McSweet Millennium Love Plush, all very cute and super impressive that these were such large dolls in comparison to the usual tiny variety we are offered with our Happy Meal. Apparently they were quite popular at the time, at least in Singapore:

Things are getting out of hand in strait-laced Singapore lately, and it’s all because of Hello Kitty, the round-faced cartoon cat with no mouth. On New Year’s Day, the city-state’s 113 McDonald’s outlets began a six-week promotion that offers customers a different pair of Hello Kitty characters each week when they purchase an Extra Value Meal.

Since then, passionate consumers — mostly teenagers — have stormed the chain’s outlets, offering to pay as much as S$200-$300 (U.S. $119-$179) for each set of the limited-edition dolls, according to Singapore’s the Straits Times. Arguments and fistfights have broken out in the long lines, and on Jan. 13, seven people were injured when a mob pressed against one franchise’s plate-glass door and shattered it.

Though currently their prices don’t seem to be too through the roof, I can only imagine that they will appreciate in value.


The Hello Kitty Spam Kit is Back to Make Your Precooked Meat Look Better Than Ever - Recipes

Huh? What? Yeah, that’s what I said when I looked at the label of the three dolls above I had found at the thrift store the other week. McDonald’s gave away almost full size Hello Kitty Dolls? And why were they called “Dear Daniel?” You’ve heard it here first, I never knew the boy Hello Kitty was named Dear Daniel. And if you didn’t either, now you do. Thankfully, there’s a website called, of course, “ihearthellokitty.com” where you can find out about the connection between McDonald’s and Hello Kitty and where I found out more about these dolls:

As previously mentioned, these were third in the series, the first being Hello Kitty x McDonald’s 1999 Love McKitty Plush and the second Hello Kitty x McDonald’s 2000 McSweet Millennium Love Plush, all very cute and super impressive that these were such large dolls in comparison to the usual tiny variety we are offered with our Happy Meal. Apparently they were quite popular at the time, at least in Singapore:

Things are getting out of hand in strait-laced Singapore lately, and it’s all because of Hello Kitty, the round-faced cartoon cat with no mouth. On New Year’s Day, the city-state’s 113 McDonald’s outlets began a six-week promotion that offers customers a different pair of Hello Kitty characters each week when they purchase an Extra Value Meal.

Since then, passionate consumers — mostly teenagers — have stormed the chain’s outlets, offering to pay as much as S$200-$300 (U.S. $119-$179) for each set of the limited-edition dolls, according to Singapore’s the Straits Times. Arguments and fistfights have broken out in the long lines, and on Jan. 13, seven people were injured when a mob pressed against one franchise’s plate-glass door and shattered it.

Though currently their prices don’t seem to be too through the roof, I can only imagine that they will appreciate in value.


The Hello Kitty Spam Kit is Back to Make Your Precooked Meat Look Better Than Ever - Recipes

Huh? What? Yeah, that’s what I said when I looked at the label of the three dolls above I had found at the thrift store the other week. McDonald’s gave away almost full size Hello Kitty Dolls? And why were they called “Dear Daniel?” You’ve heard it here first, I never knew the boy Hello Kitty was named Dear Daniel. And if you didn’t either, now you do. Thankfully, there’s a website called, of course, “ihearthellokitty.com” where you can find out about the connection between McDonald’s and Hello Kitty and where I found out more about these dolls:

As previously mentioned, these were third in the series, the first being Hello Kitty x McDonald’s 1999 Love McKitty Plush and the second Hello Kitty x McDonald’s 2000 McSweet Millennium Love Plush, all very cute and super impressive that these were such large dolls in comparison to the usual tiny variety we are offered with our Happy Meal. Apparently they were quite popular at the time, at least in Singapore:

Things are getting out of hand in strait-laced Singapore lately, and it’s all because of Hello Kitty, the round-faced cartoon cat with no mouth. On New Year’s Day, the city-state’s 113 McDonald’s outlets began a six-week promotion that offers customers a different pair of Hello Kitty characters each week when they purchase an Extra Value Meal.

Since then, passionate consumers — mostly teenagers — have stormed the chain’s outlets, offering to pay as much as S$200-$300 (U.S. $119-$179) for each set of the limited-edition dolls, according to Singapore’s the Straits Times. Arguments and fistfights have broken out in the long lines, and on Jan. 13, seven people were injured when a mob pressed against one franchise’s plate-glass door and shattered it.

Though currently their prices don’t seem to be too through the roof, I can only imagine that they will appreciate in value.


Watch the video: The shocking truth about Hello Kitty