New recipes

Potato Gratin with Rosemary Crust

Potato Gratin with Rosemary Crust


A savory pie filled with hearty potato gratin and aromatic rosemary.MORE+LESS-

Make with

Pillsbury Pie Crust

1

(14.1 ounce) package refrigerated pie crusts

1

tablespoons chopped fresh rosemary

1/4

teaspoons freshly ground pepper

2

cups (8 ounces) shredded Gruyere cheese, divided

1-1/2 pounds Yukon gold potatoes

1-1/2 pounds sweet potatoes

Hide Images

  • 1

    Preheat oven to 450° F . Unroll piecrusts on a lightly floured surface. Sprinkle rosemary, pepper, and 1/2 cup cheese over 1 pie crust; top with remaining piecrust. Roll into a 13-inch circle. Press on bottom and up sides of a 9-inch springform pan; fold edges under. Chill.

  • 2

    Meanwhile, peel and thinly slice Yukon gold and sweet potatoes.

  • 3

    Layer one-third each of Yukon gold, sweet potatoes, and salt in prepared crust. Sprinkle with 1/4 cup cheese. Repeat layers twice, pressing layers down slightly to fit.

  • 4

    Microwave cream and garlic in a 1-cup microwave-safe measuring cup at HIGH 45 seconds; pour over potato layers in pan. Sprinkle with remaining 3/4 cup cheese. Cover pan with heavy-duty aluminum foil. Place on a baking sheet.

  • 5

    Bake at 450° F for 1 hour. Uncover and bake 25 minutes or until potatoes are done and crust is richly browned. Let stand 10 to 15 minutes. Carefully transfer to a serving plate, and remove sides of pan. If desired, carefully slide gratin off bottom of pan, using a long knife or narrow spatula. Garnish, if desired.

No nutrition information available for this recipe


Tag: Potato Gratin with Rosemary Crust

Find 20+ recipes you’ll want to gobble for your Thanksgiving feast. Thanksgiving is around the corner and I’m celebrating with a little giveaway! And sharing a round-up of recipes for your Thanksgiving feast! Click on the links for the complete recipes for your Thanksgiving feast! Nutter Butter Turkey Cupcakes! These little gobblers are fun to make&hellip


Position a rack in the center of the oven and preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Lightly butter the bottom of a 9 by 13-inch baking pan. Line the pan with a piece of parchment paper. The butter will hold the paper in place.

Dry the potatoes with a kitchen towel. Fit a Benriner with the medium julienne blade. Cut a slice from one side of the potato so it will lie flat against the blade of the Benriner. Attach the guard to the potato, then slice the potato into julienne strips. Repeat with the rest of the potatoes. You should have about 2 cups julienned potatoes.

Place the heavy cream in a large saute pan, add the butter, and season with a pinch of salt, 1/2 teaspoon pepper, and a pinch of cayenne (or a few drops of Tabasco). Add the rosemary sprigs.

Bring to a simmer over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally until the butter has melted. Add the potatoes and move them around gently with a pair of tongs to coat them. After about 2 minutes, the cream will thicken because of the starch in the potatoes.

Remove the pan from the heat, and remove & discard the rosemary. Using a rasp grater, grate the garlic directly into the potatoes (or mince the garlic and add it), and stir gently. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Spread the mixture evenly in the baking pan, using an offset spatula or the back of a spoon. Sprinkle with the cheese.

Bake for 30 to 35 minutes, or until the potatoes are tender and the top is richly browned. Remove from the oven and let cool to room temperature, then run a knife around the edges of the gratin to loosen the potatoes from the sides of the pan. Cover the pan and refrigerate until cold, or for up to a day. DO AHEAD: Can be made one day ahead to this point.

To serve, preheat the broiler with the rack on the top level. Remove the potatoes from the refrigerator. Run a knife around the edges of the pan again, and, with a large spatula, lift up the thin potato sheet, on the parchment, and place it on a cutting board. With a pair of kitchen scissors, cut right through the sheet of potatoes and parchment to make rectangles. Pull away and discard the parchment paper, and return the potato pieces, right side up, to the baking pan.

Place the pan under the broiler for about 2 minutes, or until the top is well-browned and sizzling. Remove from the oven. There will be some noticable fat on the surface that has essentially fried the potatoes as they broiled. Lift each piece of potato with a large spatula and drain for a moment on paper towels, then place on a serving plate.


Potato Gratin with Rosemary Crust or Get a Pedicurist Who Cooks

Having my toes done is one of the guilty pleasures in life. I guess you might call it getting a pedicure. I go every month in the summer, sit with my feet soaking, and allow someone to trim and paint my feet. And I love it. I do it in the winter, too, but not so often. Over Christmas, when my toes always turn bright red (called "I'm Not Really a Waitress" though I was for years of high school and college), she described this gratin that's baked in a crust. In fact, she described it so well (after a story about her new pans) that I knew I could go right home and make it. Being able to describe a dish and its prep that well is a definite talent.

Here goes. I forgot to photograph making the pate brisee (pie crust made with butter) in the food processor.

I made my own version of pate brisee in the food processor. Carefully possible. You might want to wait to put the rosemary and cheese on until after you put the first crust in the pan. See pic below as I roll the crust onto the pin.


This is one way to move a crust from the counter to the pan--wrapped very loosely around the rolling pin.


The edge of this crust is purposely quite thick and will be very crunchy. There's no way to get it looking perfect. (Though is will taste that way!)

Get a kitchen scale. Don't guess at weights. Scales at groceries are inconsistent. 3 potatoes can weigh 3/4# or 1.5#, depending on their size.


I slice most potatoes in the food processor. The mandoline, while perfect for some, is dangerous for me!

Warm the cream and garlic in the microwave. Buen idea.

And now that you've gained a pound just looking, you're done. Hey, let me know if you make this. It's not any harder than scalloped potatoes really. and the presentation is just WOW. Here's the recipe:

  • 1 (14.1-oz.) package refrigerated piecrusts* (I make my own--recipe at end.)
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh rosemary
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • 2 cups (8 oz.) shredded Gruyère cheese, divided (Grate in food processor)
  • 1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold potatoes
  • 1 1/2 pounds sweet potatoes
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2/3 cup heavy cream
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • Garnish: fresh rosemary sprigs

In the bowl of your food processor, blend flour and salt. Add butter and pulse until some pieces are pea-sized, some are smaller and some are bigger. With machine running, pour water through food tube and process until dough comes together. Stop machine and remove dough. Carefully pat together into a ball and divide in half. Sprinkle counter with some flour* and place one half of the dough on it. Sprinkle dough and rolling pin liberally with flour. Quickly (trying to keep it cold here), roll out into 12-13" circle. Roll the dough loosely around the pin and place crust in pan. Sprinkle crust with the cheese and rosemary. Refrigerate pan. Roll out other crust, roll it around the pin, and place on top of refrigerated crust. Press top crust into bottom briefly and turn edges under, trimming crusts if needed. Pinch edges of crust together quickly don't spend long on this. Continue as above.

* You can also roll dough between two pieces of waxed paper (some of the crust will escape!) and leave out the floured counter entirely:

First--dampen the counter by wiping it well with a very damp cloth. This insures the waxed paper will stay put and not slip around.


-Place half of the dough between two sheets of waxed paper, place "package" on damp counter and, with rolling pin, roll out (start at center, roll to edge, and repeat- Go around the crust clock-wise) until crust is 12-13".

- Flip the crust over, quickly give one roll with the pin on that other side, take off that paper, flip again and, as you gently ease the crust into the pan, peel off the second piece of paper.

- Throw that paper away, get new paper and repeat procedure.

Reading, Listening, Viewing, Whatever else and Cooking Currently:

I'm so late. I just finished THE ART OF RACING IN THE RAIN by Garth Stein for book club. I love the idea of a dog talking, but wish he'd re-write this in 20 years. The club, over all, liked the book and, I think, all of them read it!

I am reading -all at once!- DEVIL'S TRILL by Gerald Elias (2009), THE APPRENTICE by Jacques Pepin (biography) and MATHILDA SAVITCH by Victor Lodato. I continue to read Dorie Greenspan's newest book, AROUND MY FRENCH TABLE, as well as Melissa Clark's In the Kitchen with a Good Appetite. Want cookbooks? Buy these gems.

I am listening to Hildegard von Bingen. a Christmas gift.

We saw "The King's Speech" last weekend and were bowled over. Stunning film. Go.
This week, I made a point to find out when "Glee" was on and watched an episode. Interesting, but I couldn't figure out what all the hoopla was about. Maybe because I'm a choir director.

I am playing things I haven't played in months. Did Advent intervene here? Maybe. But I spent an hour playing and singing last night before I read DEVIL'S TRILL. Singing your heart out is good for you. Remember singing around a camp fire? Or on a road trip?

I am not dreaming this week (I'm not a big dreamer), but I did wake up over and over one night thinking about a new job I've applied for. As I glanced out the windows in the dark, I saw (and I'm near-sighted) a white bird--a big one--fly into a tree in the wildwood between our house and Mike and Sara's. I laid there a minute or two, wondering if I'd imagined it and finally got up to put my glasses on and peer out into the gloom of early morning. No bird then, but there was a falling star!! I haven't seen one since Emily and I beat it up the road of the campground in Brown County, Indiana to hit the outhouse in the middle of one long night.

I talked to Tina from Prive (lovely, lovely Oregon winery) today about our upcoming shipment. While they did make wine, they made a lot less. Oregon weather just didn't cooperate for a large yield. A cool fall meant delaying and delaying picking, though they had pruned hugely in September and knew they might not get much, but they'd get tasty. And so it happened. She's concerned that the wine being shipped now (last year's) will travel through places with temperatures under freezing, thus not just compromising, but ruining the wine--blowing the corks for the cardboard to drink the fine Pinot. Tina and her husband Mark have a capital T Teensy vineyard in Oregon Pinot country, where they make boutique Pinot Noir (there's another name, I'm thinking) from their own on-site grapes and also a couple of other wines from grapes they borrow and whip into shape from Washington (a Syrah and a red blend). Between the pristine, reminiscent of France winery and their house is a comfortable patio replete with tables, chairs, plants, flowers and, the piece de resistance, an outdoor pizza oven. Now I envy Mark his vineyard and Tina her winery, but what I really covet is the pizza oven. Wineries like Prive sell pretty much on futures only you must buy ahead (barrel tasting that vintage sometimes) or you get no wine. These wines don't appear in stores or restaurants often, though you might have a better chance in Oregon itself. So our wine, waiting for shipment in her cellar, is well worth the wait for good shipping weather. It'll keep just fine right there. Our Sunday weather promises a snow storm and -12.

Our friends (and students) Jacque, Tom, Joel and Miss Ellie moved this last week. Current cooking includes a big pot of bean soup (I do this a couple of times a winter and make 20 qts or so), a slab of corn bread and hazelnut brownies (with Valhrona chocolate frosting) I'll take to them tonight for dinner. A big, fat bottle of Cotes du Rhone goes with it, along with some sparkling apple cider for the kiddoes.

For dinner, I'm trying a halibut with pico de gallo in the oven in foil. Yes, I actually do have to stop eating things like Potato Gratin with Rosemary Crust. Let you know how it comes out.


Recipe Summary

  • 4 pounds russet potatoes, cut into 1/4-inch slices
  • salt and ground black pepper to taste
  • 6 tablespoons butter
  • 6 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 1 ½ cups whole milk
  • 1 cup heavy whipping cream
  • 2 ½ cups shredded mild Cheddar cheese
  • 1 cup shredded Asiago cheese
  • 1 sweet onion, sliced into rings
  • ¾ cup sliced green onions
  • ⅓ cup shaved Parmesan cheese
  • 7 buttery round crackers (such as Ritz®), crushed
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

Place potatoes into a large pot and cover with water add salt and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low and simmer until just beginning to soften, 15 to 20 minutes drain.

Melt butter in a saucepan over medium heat add flour and whisk until the mixture thickens, 1 to 2 minutes. Pour milk and heavy cream into the saucepan cook and stir until smooth, 2 to 3 minutes. Melt Cheddar and Asiago cheese into the butter mixture cook while stirring continually until the mixture is smooth and creamy, 1 to 2 minutes. Season the sauce with salt and pepper.

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C). Butter a 9x13-inch casserole dish.

Layer about half the sliced potatoes into the bottom of the baking dish. Top the potatoes with sweet onion slices and green onions pour about 1/3 of the cheese sauce over the onions. Arrange the remaining potato slices into the dish pour remaining cheese sauce over the potatoes. Sprinkle Parmesan cheese and crushed crackers over the top.

Bake in the preheated oven until hot in the center and beginning to brown at the edge, about 30 minutes. Sprinkle parsley over the top of the dish to serve.


The key to this gratin's great flavor? Infusing the cream with garlic.

Recipes you want to make. Cooking advice that works. Restaurant recommendations you trust.

© 2021 Condé Nast. All rights reserved. Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement and Privacy Policy and Cookie Statement and Your California Privacy Rights. Bon Appétit may earn a portion of sales from products that are purchased through our site as part of our Affiliate Partnerships with retailers. The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of Condé Nast. Ad Choices


How do you make Parmesan Crusted Potato Gratin?

For this recipe you’ll need red bliss potatoes, butter, EVOO, fresh rosemary, grated Parmesan cheese and Kosher salt. Start by combining the butter, oil and rosemary in a small saucepan until melted. You can also do this in a microwave cooker.

Brush a little of the butter mixture on the bottom of a 10-inch skillet. You can use a stainless steel or cast iron skillet however, do not use a non stick pan as it will be going into the oven.

Next, wash the potato skins with a vegetable brush under cold water then dry them off. Slice the potatoes into 1/4-inch thick round slices and place them in the skillet in a circular pattern.

Brush half of the butter mixture on top of the potatoes, sprinkle with Kosher salt then bake in a preheated 400 degree F oven for 45 minutes. Finally, brush the remaining butter on top of the potatoes, sprinkle the top with the cheese and bake for another 15 minutes.

When removing from the oven, PLEASE remember to use an oven mitt on the handle so you don’t burn yourself.(Been there, done that!) My family LOVED this Parmesan Crusted Potato Gratin and went perfectly with our grilled rib eye steaks and roasted green beans.


Slow Cooker Gratin Potatoes

So, I'm just going to state up front that this may not be the "healthiest" recipe I've shared all year. It's more of a holiday, eat once or twice a year type of food if you want to go for that splurge. I first got the idea for these when I was watching Bobby Flay making potatoes on a Food Network Thanksgiving Special. My immediate thought? First, obviously, yum. Second, I really think that could happen in a slow cooker. After doing a little research and realizing that "gratin" means cooking them in a shallow baking dish under a broiler, and realizing that doesn't really apply to the slow cooker, I decided to go for it anyway!

So while this may not be a traditional gratin, I still think it turned out amazingly well! All the layers of potatoes were perfectly cooked and the little bit of parmesan cheese sprinkled on top gave it that nice golden brown crust.

I added plenty of seasoning because I just love herb flavors! Thyme to me was the perfect match although you could also go with rosemary or sage as well. This could actually be a fun way to customize this side to go with your main dish.

Next up, heavy cream. I know. You're shocked right? Because I only use cream in like 95% of my recipes. But this is the way it has to be. The simple flavor of the cream makes this dish.

And of course, the little sprinkle of parmesan cheese on the top adds just the right amount of flavor. I paired our potatoes up with a tasty rosemary roast beef and I will share that recipe later this week! Perfect for a holiday dinner or just s special meal!


Classic Potato and Leek Gratin

In this classic dish, thinly sliced potatoes are layered with a distinctive Mornay sauce. Mornay sauce is a Béchamel sauce with the addition of Gruyère cheese. The additions of savory leeks, garlic, and rosemary combine in a wonderful way in the sauce to infuse flavor into every bite. This recipe is a warm, comforting side dish, or hearty enough for the main event!

Classic Potato & Leek Gratin
Serves 6 - 8

Ingredients:
2 lbs Idaho potatoes (about 7-8 potatoes), washed, peeled, and thinly sliced with a mandoline
5 tablespoons butter, divided
3 small leeks, green parts removed, finely sliced
1 tablespoon rosemary, minced
4 cloves garlic, minced
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
3 cups whole milk
2 teaspoons kosher salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1-1/2 cup grated Gruyère, plus
2 tablespoons reserved as topping

Directions:
1. Preheat the oven to 400°F.

2. Prep the potatoes. Use a sharp peeler to peel the potatoes. Rinse off, and then slice into 1/8” slices using a handheld mandoline.

3. In a large saucepan, melt 1 tablespoon butter and cook the leeks over medium heat until they are translucent, about 10 minutes. Add the rosemary and garlic and cook for about another 3 minutes.

4. Prepare the roux. In a separate, small saucepan, heat the remaining 4 tablespoons of butter. Once the butter has melted, whisk in the flour until the mixture is completely smooth. Continue cooking for about 1-2 minutes. This process removes the raw flour flavor and helps create a silky sauce.

5. Create a Béchamel sauce by very slowly pouring milk into the roux, continue whisking the mixture until the sauce is smooth. Add in the salt and pepper and continue whisking over medium-low heat for 3-5 minutes until the sauce thickens and becomes very creamy.

6. Transform the sauce into a Mornay sauce by slowly adding in the Gruyère cheese. Continue cooking and whisking for a few more minutes until the sauce is smooth, and the cheese is well incorporated. Add the cooked leeks mixture to the sauce.

7. Layer the gratin. Butter the bottom and sides of a large baking dish and lay a single layer of potatoes. Pour some of the sauce over the potatoes and continue to layer the potatoes, pouring more sauce at each layer. Repeat this step until all of the potatoes are used (or you get to within 1/2” from the top of your dish).

8. Coat the final layer of potatoes with sauce and sprinkle with the reserved cheese.

9. Cover the gratin with a tight fitting lid or foil and bake for 60 minutes. Remove the lid or foil, and continue to bake for another 10 minutes, or until the top turns golden brown.


Potato Gratin With Gruyere and Fresh Rosemary

1 (14.1-oz.) package refrigerated piecrusts

1 tablespoon chopped fresh rosemary

¼ teaspoon freshly ground pepper

2 cups (8 oz.) shredded Gruyère cheese, divided

1 ½ pounds Yukon gold potatoes

1 ½ pounds sweet potatoes

1 teaspoon kosher salt

⅔ cup heavy cream

1 garlic clove, minced

Garnish: fresh rosemary sprigs

Directions

Step 1
Preheat oven to 450°. Unroll piecrusts on a lightly floured surface. Sprinkle rosemary, pepper, and 1/2 cup cheese over 1 piecrust top with remaining piecrust. Roll into a 13-inch circle. Press on bottom and up sides of a 9-inch springform pan fold edges under. Chill.

Step 2
Meanwhile, peel and thinly slice Yukon gold and sweet potatoes.

Step 3
Layer one-third each of Yukon gold potatoes, sweet potatoes, and salt in prepared crust. Sprinkle with 1/4 cup cheese. Repeat layers twice, pressing layers down slightly to fit.

Step 4
Microwave cream and garlic in a 1-cup microwave-safe measuring cup at HIGH 45 seconds pour over potato layers in pan. Sprinkle with remaining 3/4 cup cheese. Cover pan with heavy-duty aluminum foil. Place on a baking sheet.

Step 5
Bake at 450° for 1 hour. Uncover and bake 25 minutes or until potatoes are done and crust is richly browned. Let stand 10 to 15 minutes. Carefully transfer to a serving plate, and remove sides of pan. If desired, carefully slide gratin off bottom of pan using a long knife or narrow spatula. Garnish, if desired.