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Spinach Soufflé recipe

Spinach Soufflé recipe


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A fantastic spinach souffle recipe that is worth mastering. It worked, as you will see!

3 people made this

IngredientsServes: 6

  • 275g fresh spinach (leaves only)
  • 50g butter
  • 1 small onion, finely chopped
  • 25g plain flour
  • 250ml warm milk
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon grated nutmeg
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • 3 eggs
  • 25g freshly grated Parmesan
  • 1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar

MethodPrep:25min ›Cook:50min ›Ready in:1hr15min

  1. Preheat oven to 180 C / Gas 4. Grease a round ovenproof dish with high sides.
  2. Wash spinach and place into a large pan while still wet. Heat over a medium heat until it falls apart, then drain in a sieve.
  3. Melt butter in a small saucepan. Add onion and cook for 3-4 minutes until soft. Stir in flour, then milk. Add salt, nutmeg and pepper and boil, stirring continuously, beating with a whisk over low heat to make a thick bechamel. Remove from heat.
  4. Separate eggs. Beat egg yolks in a large bowl until frothy, then stir in the slightly cooled sauce in a thin stream, whisking vigourously.
  5. Press the spinach to release any excess moisture, and chop finely. Add with the Parmesan to the mixture.
  6. Beat the egg whites until stiff, adding the cream of tartar. Fold into the mixture. Pour everything into the prepared dish, then place into a large baking dish lined with a tea towel. Fill the outer dish with 2-3cm boiling water and carefully place the lot in the oven. Don't allow ANY water to splash into the souffle; you can also place the dishes into the oven BEFORE filling the outer one with water.
  7. Bake in preheated oven for 50-60 minutes until the souffle can be pierced with a knife and nothing sticks to it, and it is brown on top. Don't open the oven whilst cooking. Serve immediately.

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Recipe Summary

  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, room temperature, plus more for baking dish
  • 1/3 cup plain dried breadcrumbs
  • 5 cups (5 ounces) packed spinach, trimmed and washed
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons whole milk
  • 1/2 cup grated Gruyere cheese
  • Coarse salt and ground pepper
  • 2 large eggs, separated, plus 2 large egg whites

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Butter a round 1-quart tall-sided baking dish and dust with breadcrumbs set aside. In a large skillet, heat 2 tablespoons water over medium-high. Add spinach and cook, stirring constantly, until wilted, about 4 minutes. Transfer to a strainer to cool press to release liquid.

In a medium saucepan, melt butter over medium until bubbling. Add flour and whisk until a paste forms. Continue to cook until pale blond in color, 2 to 3 minutes. Whisking, gradually add milk. Cook, whisking, until lumps are gone and mixture is thickened, 3 to 5 minutes. Remove from heat. Stir in cheese until melted season with salt and pepper. Transfer souffle base to a large bowl.

In a food processor, pulse spinach and egg yolks until coarsely pureed. Add 1/4 cup souffle base pulse until blended. Stir spinach mixture into remaining souffle base. (To store, press plastic wrap against surface and keep at room temperature, up to 4 hours.)

In a large bowl, using an electric mixer, beat 4 egg whites and pinch of salt on medium-high until stiff peaks form (do not overbeat), about 3 minutes. In 2 additions, gently fold egg whites into souffle base. Pour batter into prepared dish and bake until souffle is tall, browned, and firm to the touch, about 35 minutes. (Avoid opening oven during first 25 minutes of baking.) Serve immediately.


Recipe Summary

  • 3 tablespoons breadcrumbs
  • 10 ounces spinach, well washed, tough stems removed
  • 4 teaspoons unsalted butter
  • 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 1 1/2 cups skim milk
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • 2 whole large eggs, separated
  • 1 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese (2 ounces)
  • 2 large egg whites
  • Pinch cream of tartar
  • Cooking spray

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Position rack in the center of the oven. Coat a 2-quart souffle dish or 6 individual (8-ounce) dishes with cooking spray. Coat with breadcrumbs. Tap out excess set aside.

Fill a bowl with ice and water set aside. Place a steamer basket in a large saucepan fill with 1 inch of water. Bring to a boil, and add the spinach. Cover, and steam until wilted, about 3 minutes. Drain, and plunge into ice bath to stop cooking. Let cool, and squeeze out excess water. Place the spinach in the bowl of a food processor pulse until finely chopped set aside. You should have about 1 cup.

Melt the butter in a small saucepan over medium heat. Whisk in flour, and cook, stirring constantly, for 3 minutes. Gradually whisk in the milk, and bring just to a simmer. Cook, stirring constantly, until slightly thickened, about 3 minutes. Stir in salt and pepper. Remove from heat, and set aside.

In a large bowl, whisk 2 egg yolks until blended. Whisk in a little white sauce to temper the eggs, then add the remaining sauce, whisking until combined. Add the cooked spinach and grated cheese.

Place the 4 egg whites and cream of tartar in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the whisk attachment. Beat on low until soft peaks begin to form. Increase speed to high beat until stiff peaks form and egg whites are smooth.

Using a rubber spatula, transfer 1/3 of egg whites to spinach mixture gently fold in until blended. Add spinach mixture to remaining egg whites gently fold in until just combined. Pour into prepared dish or dishes.

Place souffle in oven, and reduce heat to 375 degrees. Bake until puffed and golden, 20 to 30 minutes. Serve.


Recipe Summary

  • 8 eggs
  • ¾ cup whole milk
  • 1 teaspoon garlic salt
  • ¼ teaspoon ground black pepper
  • ½ pound bacon
  • 1 red bell pepper, chopped
  • ¼ cup minced onion
  • 1 (10 ounce) package frozen chopped spinach, thawed and drained
  • ½ cup shredded Monterey Jack cheese
  • ¼ cup finely shredded Asiago cheese

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Grease a 9x13-inch baking pan.

Beat eggs in a bowl using a fork. Add milk, garlic salt, and black pepper to eggs and beat until fully integrated.

Place bacon in a large skillet and cook over medium-high heat, turning occasionally, until evenly browned, about 10 minutes. Transfer bacon to a paper towel-lined plate and drain grease from skillet. Chop bacon.

Saute red bell pepper and onion in the same skillet over medium-high heat until tender, 5 to 10 minutes.

Spread spinach into the bottom of the prepared baking pan top with bacon and red bell pepper mixture. Pour egg mixture over bacon mixture and sprinkle Monterey Jack cheese and Asiago cheese over egg mixture.

Bake in the preheated oven until a knife inserted in the center comes out clean, 35 to 45 minutes.


Jacques Pépin’s Cheese and Spinach Soufflé Recipe

I have a very personal attachment to this soufflé. The recipe comes from my mother, who told me that when she was a young bride, she wanted to make a soufflé for my father, who loved them, but she didn’t know how. A friend told her that a cheese soufflé was composed of a béchamel (white sauce), which she knew how to make, grated cheese, and eggs. So she proceeded to make one with these ingredients, not knowing that in a classic soufflé the eggs are separated—the yolks mixed into the white sauce first and the beaten whites folded in later. So she beat the whole eggs into the béchamel and was so happy with the result that she made her soufflés in this manner ever afterward!

This kind of soufflé has many advantages, the most important being that you can prepare the base mixture up to a day ahead, so there is no hectic last-minute preparation involved. Although it takes a little longer to cook than a standard soufflé and has a slightly less airy texture, it rises beautifully, browns well, and is delicious. The soufflé is made in a gratin dish rather than a soufflé mold so that it cooks faster, is crustier, and is easier to divide into portions. – Jacques Pépin

Ingredients:
3 tablespoons, plus 1 teaspoon unsalted butter
3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 1⁄4 cups cold milk
1⁄4 teaspoon salt
1⁄8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1⁄8 teaspoon ground nutmeg
3 cups baby spinach leaves
11⁄2 cups grated Gruyère or Beaufort cheese (about 4 ounces)
4 large eggs, lightly beaten
3 tablespoons coarsely chopped flat-leaf parsley or basil

1. Melt 3 tablespoons of the butter in a medium saucepan over high heat. Add the flour and stir with a whisk until well combined and sizzling, then whisk in the cold milk and bring to a boil, stirring and mixing with the whisk so the mixture doesn’t stick as it thickens. Boil for about 20 seconds, mixing continuously with the whisk. Add the salt, pepper and nutmeg and remove the pan from the heat.

2. Use the 1 remaining teaspoon butter to grease the bottom of a 3- to 4-cup oval gratin dish. Place the spinach in a bowl and microwave for 2 minutes, or until wilted.

3. By now, the white sauce should have cooled a little. Add the spinach and cheese to it and mix with the whisk. Add the eggs and parsley and mix well. Pour the
mixture into the prepared gratin dish. This step can be done a couple of hours ahead and the dish kept in the refrigerator
until cooking time.

4. When you are ready to cook the soufflé, preheat the oven to 400°. Place the gratin dish on a cookie sheet lined with nonstick aluminum foil for easy cleanup and bake for approximately 40 minutes, until well-puffed and brown. Serve immediately.

TIP: This is the ideal soufflé to assemble ahead and cook at the last moment.


Spinach and Gruyere Souffle

Souffles are much simpler to make than you think. Just stir egg yolks and spinach into cheese sauce to create your base. All that's left is to fold in egg whites and bake.

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Butter a round 1-quart tall-sided baking dish and dust with breadcrumbs set aside. In a large skillet, heat 2 tablespoons water over medium-high. Add spinach and cook, stirring constantly, until wilted, about 4 minutes. Transfer to a strainer to cool press to release liquid.
  2. In a medium saucepan, melt butter over medium until bubbling. Add flour and whisk until a paste forms. Continue to cook until pale blond in color, 2 to 3 minutes. Whisking, gradually add milk. Cook, whisking, until lumps are gone and mixture is thickened, 3 to 5 minutes. Remove from heat. Stir in cheese until melted season with salt and pepper. Transfer souffle base to a large bowl.
  3. In a food processor, pulse spinach and egg yolks until coarsely pureed. Add 1/4 cup souffle base pulse until blended. Stir spinach mixture into remaining souffle base. (To store, press plastic wrap against surface and keep at room temperature, up to 4 hours.)
  4. In a large bowl, using an electric mixer, beat 4 egg whites and pinch of salt on medium-high until stiff peaks form (do not overbeat), about 3 minutes. In 2 additions, gently fold egg whites into souffle base. Pour batter into prepared dish and bake until souffle is tall, browned, and firm to the touch, about 35 minutes. (Avoid opening oven during first 25 minutes of baking.) Serve immediately.


Quarantine Recipe: Julia Child's Spinach Souffle

I am a cookbook nerd. I have way too many and use them way too infrequently. Julia Child's Mastering the Art of French Cooking is a great read, but one I rarely cook out of. I have a hard copy and a PDF. I have carried this book around for about 25 years and have only cooked three or four recipes out of it, this is one of them. I found both volumes at a little Italian deli in Pueblo, Colorado I used to stop at this deli for Lasagna or Stuffed Shells to take home for dinner.

Souffles are wonderful things. They move surprisingly quickly and take no special tools to serve Just plunge a spoon down into the dish and scoop out what you want to serve! Put a simply dressed salad and a piece of bread beside it and you have a surprising meal. If you have a Meat and Potatoes kind of family, it may take some convincing for a recipe like this, but given the possibility of a meat shortage, it might be a handy one to keep around.

For this recipe you may use a Souffle Dish or a Pyrex dish.

Ingredients:

Butter for preparing the pan

About 1/4 cup Grated Parmesan Cheese for preparing pan

1 tbsp minced shallots (substitute sweet onions if unavailable)

3/4 c chopped frozen spinach (I use a full box and squeeze dry with my potato ricer)

1/2 c grated gruyere cheese (may substitute Swiss, Cheddar, or your favorite melting cheese)

Difficulty: Moderate. Shopping Needed for Average Household: None.

Pre-planning needed: None.

Prep Time: 15-20 Minutes, Cook Time: 23-30 Minutes

Yeild: 4 Servings

1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees f. Butter a 6 cup souffle dish and dust it with the grated cheese as if you were dusting a cake pan with flour dump any excess cheese out of souffle dish into the swiss cheese. Set dish to the side. Measure out your remaining ingredients.

2. Squeeze most of the water out of the thawed spinach with a couple paper towels or by squeezing by hand. Cook the shallots and 1 tbsp butter in a saute or frying pan on medium for 1 minute. Add the spinach and salt, stirring and breaking up the spinach until is very dry. Remove the pan from the heat.

3. n a saucepan, melt 2 1/2 tbsp butter. Stir in the flour and cook for about 2 minutes. Remove from heat and pour in milk. Beat with whisk until blended. Return to heat and stir with the whisk until the mixture is bubbling. When it thickens, whisk in the egg yolks one at a time. Remove the pan from the heat.

4. Add the spinach to the egg/ flour base until completely mixed.

5. Beat the egg whites and a pinch of salt with an electric mixer until stiff. Stir one-quarter of the egg whites and all but one tablespoon of the cheese into the souffle base. Gently fold he remaining whites into the base, using as few turns as possible to incorporate the two mixtures as completely as possible. Fold by working a rubber spatula all the way to the bottom and "fold" the mixture on top, turn the bowl one-quarter turn and repeat. Fold quickly and gently to deflate the whites as little as possible.

6. Turn the souffle out into the prepared mold, run your thumb along the edge of the souflle dish to give the souffle a clean edge, sprinkle the remaining cheese on top and place into the preheated oven. Reduce heat to 375 degrees and bake for 25-30 minutes. DO NOT open the oven during the first 20 minutes of cooking time. The Souffle is done when there is still a slight wobble in the center and the top is golden brown. For a less creamy souffle that will collapse less quickly, bake 3-4 minutes past the "wobbly center" stage.

This recipe is adapted from Mastering the Art of French Cooking, Volume One, by Julia Child, Louisette Berthoulle and Simone Beck Published by Alfred A. Knoph, 1961

Suggested sides: Make a quick salad of fresh spring greens with a classic French vinaigrette like this one.


Easy spinach soufflé that anyone can do

When you read the word souffle, you think of fancy french dishes. The difference between what you are thinking and this easy spinach soufflé is that there is nothing fancy going on here. You just saute the stuff in a pan and finish in the oven in a small ovenproof container.

Now there are plenty of ways to do this and done of them are done with a bechamel sauce. I am generally not a fan, so we are switching for heavy cream, but in the end, it’s up to you. You can switch for anything, that’s the beauty of the recipes that we are doing here for this easy spinach soufflé.

The last comment is that you will not see measurements. That’s because this dish can be very versatile. You can make it very spinach or very creamy. I will not tell you what to do. Another dish that I will not tell you what to do is this Chili con Carne that forgives everyone.

  1. Spinach, either frozen or fresh
  2. Heavy cream
  3. A bit of milk
  4. 1 clove of garlic
  5. Half of a chopped onion
  6. Shredded parmesan for a cool finish.
  1. Turn on the oven to 200. If you do not have the oven, then you must have a toaster oven. At this point, just cook the whole thing a bit longer and you just let it get a cool finish. If you do not have that as well, then disregard the whole finishing. See you don’t even need an oven.
  2. In a hot pan, throw in the chopped onion with olive oil. Saute them a bit till they become translucent. Then add the garlic. We always add the garlic later as it has the tendency to get burned and we don’t want that because burned garlic gets bitter.
  3. Add the spinach and saute everything together. Marinate them with salt, pepper, and paprika. Depending on the type of spinach, it will release a bit of water, so just stir everything up and cook it for a bit.
  4. Once the spinach has released all the water, add the heavy cream. If it gets too thick and you need to add a bit of milk.
  5. The best way to finalize it is to make sure that everything is cooked by tasting it. Generally speaking, if you followed the flow everything should be cooked.
  6. Now throw everything in an oven-proof container, put the shredded parmesan on top and bake it for 5-10 minutes.

Serve it as a side dish or for dipping. This easy spinach soufflé does it all.


Light Spinach Souffle

I made this Light Souffle to compare to a heavier more traditional souffle and found we all loved it as much. No need for the whole milk or extra butter, this lighter souffle is perfect.

Ingredients

  • Cooking spray
  • 1 1/2 tablespoon dry breadcrumbs
  • 4 cup baby spinach or any other green that wilts
  • 2/3 cup skim milk
  • 2 tablespoon all pourpose flour
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 cup freshly grated Natural & Kosher Parmesan
  • 2 large eggs, separated
  • 2 large egg whites
  • 1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar

Preparation

Place a baking sheet in the oven. Preheat oven to 375.

Coat 4 (6-ounce) ramekins with cooking spray sprinkle evenly with breadcrumbs, tilting and turning dishes to coat sides completely.

Heat a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Lightly coat pan with cooking spray. Add spinach cook for 2 minutes or until spinach wilts, tossing constantly. Place spinach in a colander let stand 5 minutes. Squeeze excess liquid from spinach. Coarsely chop spinach.

Combine 2/3 cup milk and the next 4 ingredients (through black pepper) in a small saucepan over medium-high heat, stirring with a whisk until smooth. Cook for 2 minutes or until mixture is thick and bubbly, stirring constantly. Spoon mixture into a large bowl, and let stand for 10 minutes. Stir in spinach, cheese, and egg yolks.

Combine egg whites and cream of tartar in a large bowl, and let stand at room temperature for 15 minutes. Beat with a mixer at high speed until medium peaks form (do not overbeat). Gently stir one-fourth of egg whites into spinach mixture, and gently fold in the remaining egg whites. Gently spoon mixture into prepared dishes. Sharply tap dishes 2 or 3 times on counter to level. Place dishes baking sheet and bake at 375 for 20-30 minutes until puffy and golden.


Spinach souffle

Like Parisians, souffles have a reputation for being fussy. “Why bother?” I had always thought until I recently faced a Friday night with time for cooking but an all-but-barren fridge. A trip to the store would have sapped all my creative energy, so I looked again at the lonely egg carton.

I recalled a brief conversation I once had with a chef I worked for. “I love making souffles,” he said. “They seem hard, but they’re so easy.”

But could a chef be trusted in matters of home cooking? When I found half a yellow onion, a semi-dry hunk of Parmesan and a box of frozen spinach, I decided, “Souffle, it’s what’s for dinner.”

I went straight for Julia Child’s “Mastering the Art of French Cooking, Volume I” and opened a bottle of Chardonnay to drink while studying it. According to the formula on page 163, my meager supplies could be transformed into a six- or eight-cup souffle. And it could be made with just about anything from grated cheese to canned crabmeat to winter greens or mushrooms.

Thus deconstructed, I realized that souffle is just a pantry dish with airs. Forget casseroles--this is a weekend way to use up leftovers.

Baked souffles, whether they’re for dinner or dessert, are made from three basic parts: the base (which is usually a thick cream sauce combined with egg yolks), the main flavor ingredient and whipped egg whites. It’s a three-step procedure, more mechanics than culinary artistry. And it only requires one pan, one bowl and a glass or porcelain baking dish.

I dutifully separated the requisite number of eggs and relaxed into the lock-step progression of cooking the roux: melting the butter, adding the flour and cooking it until it smelled nutty, adding the liquid and simmering it until thick. I stirred in the cooked spinach (I’d improvised a bit, cooking it with garlic, crushed red pepper and a splash of wine) and the egg yolks. I beat the whites and stirred some of them into the base to lighten it, then gently folded in the rest.

For all my trepidation, souffles really are nearly foolproof. I should know: I once accidentally mistook a cookie batter for a dessert souffle base. After I folded in the whipped egg whites, I held my breath as the individual souffles went into the oven. Surprise! They rose beautifully.

The thing my near-disaster proved is that the magic of the souffle is in the egg whites. Whipped to soft, droopy peaks, their air cells expand in the hot oven and raise the souffle like a spring shoot emerging from the ground--no parchment paper collar required.

Many souffles don’t even require a white sauce, just something thick to use as a base. In fact, most dessert souffles are made this way--thick melted chocolate will work just fine so will something as simple as melted jam.

Once the souffle was safely baking, I turned on the oven light and stood back with my glass of wine to watch the show. Soon, it began a steady rise, climbing the sides of the baking dish on a coating of grated cheese and growing a beautifully caramelized crown.

I ended up undercooking my spinach souffle slightly, so I just sent it straight back into the oven. And once it was done there was no need for panic. Though it started to sink as soon as I served it, the souffle stayed unctuous and light, singing the clean flavor of spinach, even when we went back for seconds.