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Curry flavoured tasty lamb recipe

Curry flavoured tasty lamb recipe


  • Recipes
  • Dish type
  • Main course
  • Curry
  • Lamb curry

A lovely beautiful gravy lamb with simple flavours that are tasty! :)

15 people made this

IngredientsMakes: 1 lamb curry

  • Half red sweet Pepper
  • 20 Chopped cubes of lamb
  • 1 big garlic clove
  • Half and onion
  • 1 Spring onion
  • 1 table spoon of curry paste or powder
  • 1 tea spoon of chilli powder
  • 2 table spoons of oil
  • 30 ml soy sauce
  • paprika
  • black pepper or salt if needed
  • water

MethodPrep:10min ›Cook:25min ›Ready in:35min

  1. finely slice onions and garlic preferably and lengthways slice strips of sweet pepper.
  2. On another chopping board chop up the fillet of lamb in a cube shape.
  3. once done chopping add the oil to a frying pan and heat for 1 min on a medium fire until oil is heated.
  4. Add the vegetables mixing with wooden spoon for 2 mins then add curry powder and stir in for 1 min.
  5. Add meat to pan mixing in until brown then add water for gravy then add soy sauce
  6. leave to simmer on a low heat for 50 mins checking every 5 or 10 mins so it doesn't burn or stick to pan.

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Reviews in English (2)

I will b making this look yammy-21 Apr 2015


21 Instant Pot Curries (The Best Indian Curry Recipes)

Presenting 21 Instant pot curries to suit every palate. The best of Indian curries featuring chicken, lamb, prawns, paneer, beans, mushrooms, vegetables. mmm! Take your pick!

Craving curry? Here's a collection of 21 Indian curries made in the instant pot that will have you salivating.

Making Indian curries has become so easy ever since I started using the instant pot. True, I had my trusty old stovetop pressure cooker but I had to count the whistles, keep track of the time and so on. Sometimes, I forgot to switch it off and my food turned to mush. At other times, I had turmeric-laden liquid spraying all over if the seal was not secured properly.

Now? The stovetop pressure cooker has been banished and my two instant pots take pride of place on the countertop. And making curry dishes has become a breeze!

In this post, I bring to you all your favourite Indian curry recipes in one place. Quite a few of them are from Indian Ambrosia, my blog, but some have been selected from around the web to give you more choice.

All of them go perfectly with either Indian bread (naan, chapati, roomali roti), plain steamed rice, or cumin rice.


How to make lamb and potato curry

  • Cook the potatoes &ndash boil the diced potatoes in water for 6-7 minutes or until just tender, drain and set on one side.
  • Sauté the garlic and onions &ndash add the sunflower oil to a pan &ndash tip in the garlic and onions and gently fry for 5 minutes, add in the curry powder.
  • Add the lamb mince and tomatoes&ndash tip in the lamb mince and baby plum tomatoes and stir fry for around 5 minutes to brown the mince.
  • Add the potatoes and peas &ndash then season with salt &ndash put the lid over the pan and cook for around 15 minutes until everything is cooked through properly.
  • Scatter over the chopped coriander

Get loads more easy dinner recipes here

Love curry? Try one of our easy curry recipes here


A Mild Lamb Curry

Lamb was not something I really ate a lot of before I moved over here. I guess it was just not something that was readily available where I lived over in Canada, or maybe it was because it was not something that my mother ever really cooked when I was growing up.

She did try to cook some lamb chops one time, but they smelled like she was burning a pair of wool mittens when they were cooking, and none of us would touch them. That was my sum whole total experience of lamb.

After Todd and I got married our church Ward took us out for a meal about a week later to celebrate. One of the things on the menu at the restaurant was Roasted Lamb Loin with a Cumberland sauce. It sounded really good and I thought . . . . why not be brave and go for it.
I fell in love. Totally in love. The meat was sweet and tender and incredibly tasty.

Since then I have taken every opportunity to cook lamb when I can. I once did a slow roasted shoulder in the oven, using lemon and oregano and it was succulently delicious with some boiled potatoes. That reminds me . . . I need to do that again soon!

We had a delicious lamb curry one night for our tea last week and it was gorgeously tasty. Not too spicy . . . I don't like it when the spice in a dish masks the true flavours of what you are eating. The rich flavour of the lamb shone through in this, with just a hint of curry.

It was incredibly moreish served up with a Coriander Rice. I had thought there would be leftovers the next day for lunch . . . but it was gone right away. Totally gone. In fact . . . we licked the platter clean.


*A Mild Lamb Curry*
Serves 6
Printable Recipe

A delicious gentle curry, creamy and mild. Serve with some tasty lime coriander rice.

2 tsp coriander seeds
2 tsp cumin seeds
The seeds from 8 cardamom pods
4 whole cloves
3 TBS mild flavoured oil
4 medium onions, peeled and thinly sliced
1 KG of lamb shoulder, trimmed and cut into ½ inch squares
2 tsp ground turmeric
4 fat cloves of garlic, peeled and minced
1 TBS minced fresh ginger root
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
450ml of coconut milk
150ml of chicken stock
The juice of one lime

For the rice:
500g basmati rice
1 ounce butter
A large handful of fresh coriander, chopped
The grated zest of one lime
The juice of one lime
Salt and black pepper to taste

To make the curry, toast the seeds and whole cloves in a dry skillet until fragrant. Tip into a pestle and mortar and grind until fairly fine. Pour two TBS of the oil into a heavy based saucepan over high heat. Once hot, add the onions and cook, stirring for about 5 minutes. Scoop out to a bowl and set aside. Add the remaining oil and add the lamb, in batched, browning one batch on all sides before removing to the bowl with the onions and browning the rest. Don’t overcrowd the pan or your meat will not brown properly and will stew instead of sear.

Tip the onions and meat back into the pan along with the ground spices, the turmeric, garlic and ginger root. Season to taste with some salt and pepper. Toss all together and then add the stock, coconut milk and lime juice, stirring and scraping any juicy bits from the bottom of the pan. Bring to the boil, then reduce the heat to low, cover and simmer for about an hour, until very tender. Remove the lid and simmer for about 15 minutes longer. Taste and adjust seasoning as necessary.

While the curry is cooking cook the rice. Place the rice in a sauce pan with double the volume of salted water. Bring to the boil. Cover with a lid. Reduce the heat and simmer for about 10 to 12 minutes until the rice is completely cooked and all of the moisture has been absorbed. Remove the pan from the heat and let sit for about 10 minutes with the lid on. Stir in the butter, lime zest, lime juice and chopped coriander with a fork. Serve immediately with the curry.


Lamb Thai Green Curry

Thai green curry is fab, but have you ever tried it with lamb? My Lamb Thai Green Curry is full of the delicious, aromatic flavours of lemongrass, coriander, cumin, garlic and chilli, and can made from scratch in under 30 minutes! It’s also dairy and gluten free and can be adapted to make it mild enough to serve to young children – or you can make it as hot as you like!

I adore Thai green curry…it is nearly always the dish I order when I go out to a Thai restaurant (I know I should be more adventurous – but I just love it!) and I love cooking it at home too. But until recently I have never made a Lamb Thai Green Curry – which I feel is a bit of an oversight!!

Eons ago I used to work for a ‘well know luxury supermarket’ in their wine buying team and one of the perks of being in the buying teams is we regularly got the opportunity to do cookery workshops. (I think this was probably more relevant for the buyers who worked in the food buying teams – especially those who worked on ready meals etc., but we all got to participate nonetheless, and I absolutely relished the opportunity and signed up for as many classes as I could do!)

One of the recipes I learnt to make during that time was a Thai green curry…and it has been an absolute favourite ever since.

Over time my Thai green curry recipe has evolved and been adapted – partly to simplify it and partly to improve the flavour and I am really happy with it…but when I initially used it with lamb it was a bit of a disaster – all I could taste was the lamb – the delicate Thai flavours had all but disappeared! (Though the lamb still tasted yummy.)

So the second time I tried this out I seriously beefed up the quantities of herbs, chilli and spices to ensure the flavour of the sauce could be tasted as well as the lamb – and it did – second time round the balance much better.

To improve it further, I cooked the lamb first and poured away the fat, before adding the homemade Thai green curry paste. A lot of the flavour of lamb is in the fat – which is usually a really good thing as it adds a ton of flavour to a lamb tagine or Indian style lamb curry. But with the delicate Thai flavours of lemongrass and coriander, it was too much. Simply by draining the fat I was able to get the balance right…

…and I am so pleased I did, because my Lamb Thai Green Curry now tastes wonderful – perfectly balanced flavours and just a touch of heat coming from the chilli. If you haven’t yet tasted a Thai green curry made with lamb I really recommend that you do!

I have used 4 mild green chillies in my sauce – the normal larger sized green chillies you can buy from supermarkets (in the UK, at least). If I am making this for the kids I remove all the seeds and some of the membranes to give a milder taste. You can leave them in if you prefer a hotter flavour. Alternatively, if you prefer not to handle fresh chillies, you can use 1 teaspoon dried chilli flakes instead for a similar level of heat as my milder version.

I like to serve my Lamb Thai Green Curry with simply cooked plain jasmine rice, but it would also go well with coconut rice, noodles, some stir fried vegetables or a simple Asian-style salad.

I very, very rarely suggest white wine with lamb, but this is an occasion when I actually think it works much better – I find a red wine just kills the delicate aromatic flavours in a Thai curry, whereas a robust, but aromatic white will still stand up well to the flavour of the lamb and compliment the aromatics in the sauce beautifully. My best match would be a ripe and zesty Sauvignon Blanc from somewhere like New Zealand or South Africa, or a rich and tropical tasting Viognier, or Viognier blend, from the South of France or Chile.


Curry flavoured tasty lamb recipe - Recipes

*A Mild Lamb Curry*
Serves 6

A delicious gentle curry, creamy and mild. Serve with some tasty lime coriander rice.

2 tsp coriander seeds
2 tsp cumin seeds
The seeds from 8 cardamom pods
4 whole cloves
3 TBS mild flavoured oil
4 medium onions, peeled and thinly sliced
1 KG of lamb shoulder, trimmed and cut into ½ inch squares
2 tsp ground turmeric
4 fat cloves of garlic, peeled and minced
1 TBS minced fresh ginger root
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
450ml of coconut milk
150ml of chicken stock
The juice of one lime

For the rice:
500g basmati rice
1 ounce butter
A large handful of fresh coriander, chopped
The grated zest of one lime
The juice of one lime
Salt and black pepper to taste

To make the curry, toast the seeds and whole cloves in a dry skillet until fragrant. Tip into a pestle and mortar and grind until fairly fine. Pour two TBS of the oil into a heavy based saucepan over high heat. Once hot, add the onions and cook, stirring for about 5 minutes. Scoop out to a bowl and set aside. Add the remaining oil and add the lamb, in batched, browning one batch on all sides before removing to the bowl with the onions and browning the rest. Don’t overcrowd the pan or your meat will not brown properly and will stew instead of sear.

Tip the onions and meat back into the pan along with the ground spices, the turmeric, garlic and ginger root. Season to taste with some salt and pepper. Toss all together and then add the stock, coconut milk and lime juice, stirring and scraping any juicy bits from the bottom of the pan. Bring to the boil, then reduce the heat to low, cover and simmer for about an hour, until very tender. Remove the lid and simmer for about 15 minutes longer. Taste and adjust seasoning as necessary.

While the curry is cooking cook the rice. Place the rice in a sauce pan with double the volume of salted water. Bring to the boil. Cover with a lid. Reduce the heat and simmer for about 10 to 12 minutes until the rice is completely cooked and all of the moisture has been absorbed. Remove the pan from the heat and let sit for about 10 minutes with the lid on. Stir in the butter, lime zest, lime juice and chopped coriander with a fork. Serve immediately with the curry.


Instructions

  1. Heat a large pan or deep frying pan and put the onions in.
  2. Don’t add any oil yet, just sweat them a little. When they begin to steam, keep stirring them on a middle heat, as they begin to go a little bit transparent put in your preferred oil, ghee (this is clarified butter, and imparts a wonderful flavour). Let the whole thing gently fry, this will give you a far better flavour [this also applies to gravies too] when they are just turning golden take them off the heat and put aside.
  3. 1 tsp cumin, 2tsp coriander, 1 tsp turmeric, 1tsp Kashmiri chilli powder.
  4. In a small frying pan put the spices spreading them out over the bottom of the pan. Toast with a very gentle heat as they begin to give off an aroma add two tablespoons of ghee or oil, and then mix with the powder until it forms a paste now also add the garlic and ginger. Be very careful not to have the heat too high. Add water and stir to form a gravy, cook until the oil begins to separate from the rest of the mix.
  5. Now fry and seal your meat, chicken, lamb, beef, or whatever you like.
  6. When you think the meat is sealed, add you onions, and then add these to the spices you have just cooked stirring very well.
  7. Add a few chopped tomatoes or use a tin
  8. Bring it to the boil on a medium heat, then turn the heat down and let it simmer for an hour with a lid on, then fifteen minutes without the lid, but stir well, and obviously don’t let it go dry.

Lamb saag done restaurant style is different

Indian restaurant style curry is different from homestyle. It’s what you get when you go out for a curry. Homestyle is what’s all over the internet. What people make for dinner.

It’s kind of the same but completely different. That’s why what you cook winds up tasting different from what you get in a restaurant.

That unctuous sauce. That crazy gravy that’s good on its own. With a piece of naan bread dipped in it. That’s what this is about.

Restaurants don’t have big pots of every curry they serve just sitting around. They cook to order. And to cook for order they need to do it differently. That’s what this is about.

I’ve said this before. There are lots of Indian restaurant recipes on this blog. Learn how to do it once and you can make anything.

Any time you want. What’s better than that?


Karen Burns-Booth's quick lamb curry recipe is perfect for when you literally can't wait for a takeaway to arrive, as the thinly sliced lamb neck is cooked in minutes in a hot wok. Marinating the lamb for 30 minutes first is essential, but an easy step in this delicious recipe, a staple of Chinese-American restaurants.

I love a good curry, and lamb is always a favourite when I make a big batch, however, it’s easy to get stuck in a rut with recipes sometimes, so recently I decided to try a different style of curry recipe with some beautiful British lamb neck that I had.

I’ve always loved the takeaway dish called Mongolian beef, it’s a classic dish in Chinese-American restaurants, and I used to love it when I lived in the States. The main ingredients are beef, of course, soy sauce, hoisin sauce, chillies and spring onions, and it’s served in a thick sauce with rice or noodles.

My recipe for a quick stir-fried Mongolian lamb curry is an adaptation of the classic style – cooked in a wok which makes the lamb meltingly soft, especially when sliced very thinly and stir-fried over a high heat. Marinating the lamb for 30 minutes also helps to infuse the flavours and tenderise the meat.

Serve this tasty, sticky, tender lamb curry with steamed basmati rice or noodles for a wonderful family meal at any time of the week, although it would also make a great alternative to an actual Friday night takeaway.


More tips and suggestions for making the perfect korma and what to serve it with.

Is lamb korma easy to make?

Lamb korma is very easy to make and pretty forgiving when it comes to cooking times and ingredient quantities. I'd recommend you cut your veg and prepare your spice measurements ahead of time to make sure everything go extra smoothly.

How can I thicken my lamb korma?

The easiest way of thickening a curry is to simply reduce the water content by letting it cook for longer, so continue to cook in the dish with the lid off. If you're in a hurry you can transfer it into a saucepan and reduce it over a low heat.

You can also use yogurt to thicken the dish, which will also make the korma a little milder too.

As this is a tomato-based recipe you can also add a tablespoon more tomato puree to thicken, but remember tomato puree has quite a strong taste so don't go overboard.

If you're in a rush you can use cornflour, which will definitely do the job, but will also change the texture. In a bowl or cup mix 2 teaspoons of cornflour with a few drops of water - enough to form a thin paste. Add the paste to the korma and stir through, then bring back up to heat to thicken.

Is lamb korma spicy? How do I make my lamb korma less spicy? How do I make my lamb korma more spicy?

Kormas, in general, are relatively mild and this recipe, in particular, should be fine for most children as long as you know they're comfortable with a little spice.

If you would like an even milder curry simply use less chilli powder, and if you would like more of a kick then add more.

Unfortunately, there's no easy way to make an already spicy slow-cooked korma less spicy, so just make a note to use less chilli powder next time.

How do I make my lamb korma creamier?

Due to the slow cooking and natural fats of the lamb combined with the oils your korma will be a lovely natural kind of creamy, but if you'd prefer something just a little smoother you can add a couple of tablespoons of yogurt too.

Where can I buy lamb shoulder/scrag/middle/neck and shoulder? Where can I buy spices?

For the meat it's a good idea to talk to your local butcher as they will be able to point you to the best cuts of meat for your budget, and help you make substitutions if they don't have what you're looking for. They will also be able to give you plenty of advice on cooking methods and how to get the best out of any particular cut. The meat aisle in your local supermarket should also offer plenty of variety of that will generally be after and need longer cooking times to become melt in the mouth soft.

All the spices listed here should be available your local supermarket, but you may have trouble finding some of them in smaller shops. Supermarkets will often have more than one spice section (a 'general' one and ones more related to world regions).

The products in the general section will usually come in glass jars and will often be more expensive than the stuff in plastic bags, so if you think you will use your spices up within a relatively short time it pays to pay a little more to get a lot more produce. Ground spices will generally last for 2 to 3 years, but you may notice a slight decrease in flavor and increase in bitterness as time goes on.

How can I tell if the lamb has gone bad? How can I tell if the spices are old?

The easiest way to tell if meat has gone off is to smell it - humans are highly sensitive to rotten meat, so if anything smells peculiar you should be able to tell immediately - you will get a sharp and unpleasant smell. Fresh meat doesn't have a strong odour. You can also visually inspect the meat - lamb is a red meat so should be a deep red colour - if it has visible signs of spoilage don't eat it.

While dried and ground spices are generally OK to eat for many years they do begin to lose their oils as soon as they've been ground, and will lose a little bit of flavour as time goes on. It's best best to store them in a cool dry place away from sunlight and to consume them within a year of purchase, but if you're looking to use up something that's been in the space rack for longer, and doesn't show any signs of spoilage it should be fine to do so.

Is this lamb korma suitable for vegetarians? What about vegans?

As this recipe contains lamb it's not vegetarian, but I find substituting the lamb for a vegetarian or vegan substitute works really well in this recipe - if you can't find lamb I'd go for chicken.

If you want to make a fully vegan alternative you can also substitute the double cream and butter for a vegan butter/yogurt. I think unsweetened soya yogurt works well, although you may want to use a little less than if you were using cream as it is generally thinner than double cream.

Is this recipe gluten-free?

This recipe is gluten free, just make sure that no gluten containing ingredients have been added to your vegetable stock cube (if using one) or the ground almonds.

Is this recipe keto-friendly?

While nothing in this dish (other than the small amount of sugar) is exactly keto unfriendly due to the quantities used there will be roughly 19g of carbs per serving, which is likely too high for a keto diet.

Are lamb kormas healthy?

Kormas are a great source for protein and a variety of important nutrients without being too high in fat, so make a great addition to put into your family's meal rotation.

Just be careful not to go overboard on the extras such as white rice and naan breads!

Is this recipe safe to eat while pregnant?

As long as you make sure that you follow good hygiene practices and the lamb is safely cooked through, there shouldn't be any issues with eating this dish while pregnant.

Obviously, individual health needs vary and you should consult with your health professional about anything you are unsure of.

What goes well with a lamb korma?

Aside from rice, I think naan breads are a delicious accompaniment to a good curry. Here are a couple of great recipes for a 5 minute naan bread or mini flat breads.

Poppadoms are great too, especially if you have some chutneys to go with them. My family particularly enjoy mango or aubergine chutneys as well as pickled garlic.

Can I make this recipe without lamb? What if I don't have all the spices?

While this recipe does taste fantastic with all the spices added (as with most curries they all come together to make something greater than the sum of their parts) you should be able to get away with missing the odd ingredient without too much of a hit to the flavour.

Aside from the meat you really will want to use the onions, ginger, garlic and ground almonds when it comes to the taste, and the double cream is what turns the korma into something beautifully smooth with a wonderfully light colour.

Can I add extra spice to this recipe? What about extra veg?

A korma is usually fairly mild when compared with many other curries you're likely familiar with - they're not meant to knock your head off with spice or heat. So while you can add more spice the delicate balance of flavours is generally best kept as is.

If you're looking to use up some vegetables you have going spare then putting them in the curry towards the end of cooking, with around 45 minutes left, wouldn't be a bad idea. It may not be the most traditional thing but that doesn't mean it wouldn't be very tasty!

How should I store this recipe?

As long as you've cooled it down to room temperature and popped it in the fridge within a couple of hours of making, it should last in the fridge for 2 days. Never store it at room temperature, or anything over 5C/40F.

Can you freeze lamb korma?

Yes, as long as you've cooled it down and put it in the freezer within 2 hours of making it, it will freeze well for up to to 3 months.

Thaw it out in the fridge overnight night then warm through in a saucepan. If you find it a little thick you can add a tablespoon or two of water.

Can I make this recipe ahead of time?

Korma generally refrigerates and freezes well, so you could make this well in advance and heat up when necessary.

You could prepare the meat, veg and spice mix a day ahead. Store in the fridge ready to be slow cooked when needed.

What is the best way to reheat this recipe?

Simply dishing out what you need and reheating it in a saucepan over a low heat works well. Add couple of teaspoons of water to start things off if coming out of the freezer, and put a lid on the pan if you have one. Don't forget to stir every so often to make sure nothing sticks to the pan.

Can I make this recipe in a different quantity?

One of the things I love about a korma is how easy it is to scale up or down whether you're having a romantic meal for two or feeding a family of ten - the only thing that's really limiting you is the size of your cooking pot! To make your life easier simply navigate to my recipe card where you can change the servings you want to make, which will magically update the ingredients quantities. Easy!

Can I make this recipe in a different container? Would a tin, tray or glass cookware work? Can I leave it uncovered?

I would recommend using a lidded casserole dish if at all possible as it has some fairly unique properties when it comes to absorbing and distributing heat and keeping the moisture in.

I've never tried it, but it should also be possible to fry the meat and onion and bring everything else up to a simmer in a very large frying pan, then transfer it to an oven safe dish of your choosing. A top is highly recommended even if you have to make a makeshift one out of tin foil.

I would recommend checking every so often that nothing is sticking to the sides during cooking, especially if using a thin walled metal container.