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The Daily Dish: February 9, 2016

The Daily Dish: February 9, 2016


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Dishing out the latest and greatest in food news

Learn more about what is hot and trending in the world of food and drink.

Today’s first course?

Just in time for Valentine’s Day, Starbucks is releasing a line of chocolate-centric drinks that put caffeine and cocoa front and center inside your morning grande cups. The coffee chain announced Molten Chocolate Lattes, Frappuccinos, and hot chocolate made with rich bittersweet mocha sauce and “chocolaty chips.” Starbucks is also releasing customizable GIFs if you share your hashtag StarbucksDate on social media channels. The limited-time treats are available Valentine’s week through February 14, but there’s no word on if the extra-“chocolaty” drinks will appear on permanent menus anytime soon.

Comedian Jim Gaffigan is the latest famous face to take over the role of Colonel Sanders, an honor that, since the Colonel’s resurrection last May, has also gone to Darrell Hammond and Norm MacDonald. As the newly appointed face of KFC, Gaffigan made his debut during Super Bowl 50 pregame broadcast, in a short commercial where Gaffigan has a nightmare about a “fake Colonel,” played by MacDonald, but wakes up in time to promote the chain’s latest menu addition, Nashville Hot Chicken. In case you missed the commercial Sunday night, you can watch it within this story in the News in Brief section.

Authorities in Italy have sized 85,000 metric tons of counterfeit olives as well as 7,000 tons of foreign olive oil labeled as “Made in Italy.” Nineteen counterfeiters in Italy face charges over their involvement the counterfeiting process, during which old olives from previous years’ harvests were coated with copper sulfate to revive their color. Copper sulfate is used in artwork as a coloring agent and was once used by physicians to induce vomiting — though the practice ended when it was discovered that oral exposure to the compound is toxic to humans. Police in Italy have also confirmed that another six people are now under investigation for selling foreign olive oil that was mislabeled to indicate that it was extra virgin olive oil directly from Italy. According to the Guardian, DNA testing showed that the oil was actually from Syria and Turkey.


That's today's daily dish, stop by tomorrow for another helping.


Moringa Face Mask

I whipped up this moringa face mask the day after returning from Philadelphia, where I met with my publisher and we took some pretty photos for my upcoming book (!). After many hours spent on airplanes and in airports, jumping from dry to humid to dry again, and days of wearing a whole lotta makeup, I was craving some serious clay cleansing. This is what I came up with.

The ingredients are simple enough. I started with a simple mix of gentle white white kaolin clay and water, and to that I added some raw honey and some moringa leaf powder. These four ingredients came together to make a lovely light green paste that left my complexion refreshed and brighter. Bye bye, plane scum!

I chose a raw honey I brought back from Costa Rica. It’s a ruddy dark brown colour and quite thin for honey. I purchased it at a wee farmers market and the lady who sold it to me explained in a combination of English and Spanish that the bees harvested the pollen from a special plant in the rain forest to make this dark, medicinal honey. She told me it was the sort of thing kids would be given when they were sick as a sort of cough syrup, so I thought it would be fantastic to add a healing boost to my mask. I’m assuming most of you don’t have this rather odd honey at home, but any raw honey will work as well.

Up next, moringa powder. Moringa is something else I first heard about in Costa Rica, from a Canadian ex-pat who spoke of it with infomercial like excitement. My interest was piqued, so when I saw a bag of moringa leaf powder at Marshall’s a couple weeks ago I took a closer look at the nutritional profile and was pretty impressed. A single tablespoon of the stuff contains a whopping 60% of your daily recommended iron intake! It’s also rich in antioxidants and vitamins A, B2, B6, C. It’s being investigated as a way to help end malnutrition in subtropical areas, which is super cool. Further research taught me that moringa has been used in Ayurvedic medicine for thousands of years for healing. Cool! Definitely a good addition to both face masks and smoothies. It’s got a pretty distinct “green” flavour, similar to that of spirulina or alfalfa, which isn’t relevant for the mask (hopefully!), but good to know if you’re buying a bag to use as a dietary supplement as well.

I got my moringa powder from Marshall’s for about $8, but I realize that’s not a very reliable shopping option. I also found it all over Amazon, with loads of different purchasing options. You might want to check out the bulk section at your local health food shop, too, so you don’t have to commit to a big bag of the stuff straight away. The plant you’re looking for is Moringa oleifera, and you want powder made from the leaf.


Moringa Face Mask

I whipped up this moringa face mask the day after returning from Philadelphia, where I met with my publisher and we took some pretty photos for my upcoming book (!). After many hours spent on airplanes and in airports, jumping from dry to humid to dry again, and days of wearing a whole lotta makeup, I was craving some serious clay cleansing. This is what I came up with.

The ingredients are simple enough. I started with a simple mix of gentle white white kaolin clay and water, and to that I added some raw honey and some moringa leaf powder. These four ingredients came together to make a lovely light green paste that left my complexion refreshed and brighter. Bye bye, plane scum!

I chose a raw honey I brought back from Costa Rica. It’s a ruddy dark brown colour and quite thin for honey. I purchased it at a wee farmers market and the lady who sold it to me explained in a combination of English and Spanish that the bees harvested the pollen from a special plant in the rain forest to make this dark, medicinal honey. She told me it was the sort of thing kids would be given when they were sick as a sort of cough syrup, so I thought it would be fantastic to add a healing boost to my mask. I’m assuming most of you don’t have this rather odd honey at home, but any raw honey will work as well.

Up next, moringa powder. Moringa is something else I first heard about in Costa Rica, from a Canadian ex-pat who spoke of it with infomercial like excitement. My interest was piqued, so when I saw a bag of moringa leaf powder at Marshall’s a couple weeks ago I took a closer look at the nutritional profile and was pretty impressed. A single tablespoon of the stuff contains a whopping 60% of your daily recommended iron intake! It’s also rich in antioxidants and vitamins A, B2, B6, C. It’s being investigated as a way to help end malnutrition in subtropical areas, which is super cool. Further research taught me that moringa has been used in Ayurvedic medicine for thousands of years for healing. Cool! Definitely a good addition to both face masks and smoothies. It’s got a pretty distinct “green” flavour, similar to that of spirulina or alfalfa, which isn’t relevant for the mask (hopefully!), but good to know if you’re buying a bag to use as a dietary supplement as well.

I got my moringa powder from Marshall’s for about $8, but I realize that’s not a very reliable shopping option. I also found it all over Amazon, with loads of different purchasing options. You might want to check out the bulk section at your local health food shop, too, so you don’t have to commit to a big bag of the stuff straight away. The plant you’re looking for is Moringa oleifera, and you want powder made from the leaf.


Moringa Face Mask

I whipped up this moringa face mask the day after returning from Philadelphia, where I met with my publisher and we took some pretty photos for my upcoming book (!). After many hours spent on airplanes and in airports, jumping from dry to humid to dry again, and days of wearing a whole lotta makeup, I was craving some serious clay cleansing. This is what I came up with.

The ingredients are simple enough. I started with a simple mix of gentle white white kaolin clay and water, and to that I added some raw honey and some moringa leaf powder. These four ingredients came together to make a lovely light green paste that left my complexion refreshed and brighter. Bye bye, plane scum!

I chose a raw honey I brought back from Costa Rica. It’s a ruddy dark brown colour and quite thin for honey. I purchased it at a wee farmers market and the lady who sold it to me explained in a combination of English and Spanish that the bees harvested the pollen from a special plant in the rain forest to make this dark, medicinal honey. She told me it was the sort of thing kids would be given when they were sick as a sort of cough syrup, so I thought it would be fantastic to add a healing boost to my mask. I’m assuming most of you don’t have this rather odd honey at home, but any raw honey will work as well.

Up next, moringa powder. Moringa is something else I first heard about in Costa Rica, from a Canadian ex-pat who spoke of it with infomercial like excitement. My interest was piqued, so when I saw a bag of moringa leaf powder at Marshall’s a couple weeks ago I took a closer look at the nutritional profile and was pretty impressed. A single tablespoon of the stuff contains a whopping 60% of your daily recommended iron intake! It’s also rich in antioxidants and vitamins A, B2, B6, C. It’s being investigated as a way to help end malnutrition in subtropical areas, which is super cool. Further research taught me that moringa has been used in Ayurvedic medicine for thousands of years for healing. Cool! Definitely a good addition to both face masks and smoothies. It’s got a pretty distinct “green” flavour, similar to that of spirulina or alfalfa, which isn’t relevant for the mask (hopefully!), but good to know if you’re buying a bag to use as a dietary supplement as well.

I got my moringa powder from Marshall’s for about $8, but I realize that’s not a very reliable shopping option. I also found it all over Amazon, with loads of different purchasing options. You might want to check out the bulk section at your local health food shop, too, so you don’t have to commit to a big bag of the stuff straight away. The plant you’re looking for is Moringa oleifera, and you want powder made from the leaf.


Moringa Face Mask

I whipped up this moringa face mask the day after returning from Philadelphia, where I met with my publisher and we took some pretty photos for my upcoming book (!). After many hours spent on airplanes and in airports, jumping from dry to humid to dry again, and days of wearing a whole lotta makeup, I was craving some serious clay cleansing. This is what I came up with.

The ingredients are simple enough. I started with a simple mix of gentle white white kaolin clay and water, and to that I added some raw honey and some moringa leaf powder. These four ingredients came together to make a lovely light green paste that left my complexion refreshed and brighter. Bye bye, plane scum!

I chose a raw honey I brought back from Costa Rica. It’s a ruddy dark brown colour and quite thin for honey. I purchased it at a wee farmers market and the lady who sold it to me explained in a combination of English and Spanish that the bees harvested the pollen from a special plant in the rain forest to make this dark, medicinal honey. She told me it was the sort of thing kids would be given when they were sick as a sort of cough syrup, so I thought it would be fantastic to add a healing boost to my mask. I’m assuming most of you don’t have this rather odd honey at home, but any raw honey will work as well.

Up next, moringa powder. Moringa is something else I first heard about in Costa Rica, from a Canadian ex-pat who spoke of it with infomercial like excitement. My interest was piqued, so when I saw a bag of moringa leaf powder at Marshall’s a couple weeks ago I took a closer look at the nutritional profile and was pretty impressed. A single tablespoon of the stuff contains a whopping 60% of your daily recommended iron intake! It’s also rich in antioxidants and vitamins A, B2, B6, C. It’s being investigated as a way to help end malnutrition in subtropical areas, which is super cool. Further research taught me that moringa has been used in Ayurvedic medicine for thousands of years for healing. Cool! Definitely a good addition to both face masks and smoothies. It’s got a pretty distinct “green” flavour, similar to that of spirulina or alfalfa, which isn’t relevant for the mask (hopefully!), but good to know if you’re buying a bag to use as a dietary supplement as well.

I got my moringa powder from Marshall’s for about $8, but I realize that’s not a very reliable shopping option. I also found it all over Amazon, with loads of different purchasing options. You might want to check out the bulk section at your local health food shop, too, so you don’t have to commit to a big bag of the stuff straight away. The plant you’re looking for is Moringa oleifera, and you want powder made from the leaf.


Moringa Face Mask

I whipped up this moringa face mask the day after returning from Philadelphia, where I met with my publisher and we took some pretty photos for my upcoming book (!). After many hours spent on airplanes and in airports, jumping from dry to humid to dry again, and days of wearing a whole lotta makeup, I was craving some serious clay cleansing. This is what I came up with.

The ingredients are simple enough. I started with a simple mix of gentle white white kaolin clay and water, and to that I added some raw honey and some moringa leaf powder. These four ingredients came together to make a lovely light green paste that left my complexion refreshed and brighter. Bye bye, plane scum!

I chose a raw honey I brought back from Costa Rica. It’s a ruddy dark brown colour and quite thin for honey. I purchased it at a wee farmers market and the lady who sold it to me explained in a combination of English and Spanish that the bees harvested the pollen from a special plant in the rain forest to make this dark, medicinal honey. She told me it was the sort of thing kids would be given when they were sick as a sort of cough syrup, so I thought it would be fantastic to add a healing boost to my mask. I’m assuming most of you don’t have this rather odd honey at home, but any raw honey will work as well.

Up next, moringa powder. Moringa is something else I first heard about in Costa Rica, from a Canadian ex-pat who spoke of it with infomercial like excitement. My interest was piqued, so when I saw a bag of moringa leaf powder at Marshall’s a couple weeks ago I took a closer look at the nutritional profile and was pretty impressed. A single tablespoon of the stuff contains a whopping 60% of your daily recommended iron intake! It’s also rich in antioxidants and vitamins A, B2, B6, C. It’s being investigated as a way to help end malnutrition in subtropical areas, which is super cool. Further research taught me that moringa has been used in Ayurvedic medicine for thousands of years for healing. Cool! Definitely a good addition to both face masks and smoothies. It’s got a pretty distinct “green” flavour, similar to that of spirulina or alfalfa, which isn’t relevant for the mask (hopefully!), but good to know if you’re buying a bag to use as a dietary supplement as well.

I got my moringa powder from Marshall’s for about $8, but I realize that’s not a very reliable shopping option. I also found it all over Amazon, with loads of different purchasing options. You might want to check out the bulk section at your local health food shop, too, so you don’t have to commit to a big bag of the stuff straight away. The plant you’re looking for is Moringa oleifera, and you want powder made from the leaf.


Moringa Face Mask

I whipped up this moringa face mask the day after returning from Philadelphia, where I met with my publisher and we took some pretty photos for my upcoming book (!). After many hours spent on airplanes and in airports, jumping from dry to humid to dry again, and days of wearing a whole lotta makeup, I was craving some serious clay cleansing. This is what I came up with.

The ingredients are simple enough. I started with a simple mix of gentle white white kaolin clay and water, and to that I added some raw honey and some moringa leaf powder. These four ingredients came together to make a lovely light green paste that left my complexion refreshed and brighter. Bye bye, plane scum!

I chose a raw honey I brought back from Costa Rica. It’s a ruddy dark brown colour and quite thin for honey. I purchased it at a wee farmers market and the lady who sold it to me explained in a combination of English and Spanish that the bees harvested the pollen from a special plant in the rain forest to make this dark, medicinal honey. She told me it was the sort of thing kids would be given when they were sick as a sort of cough syrup, so I thought it would be fantastic to add a healing boost to my mask. I’m assuming most of you don’t have this rather odd honey at home, but any raw honey will work as well.

Up next, moringa powder. Moringa is something else I first heard about in Costa Rica, from a Canadian ex-pat who spoke of it with infomercial like excitement. My interest was piqued, so when I saw a bag of moringa leaf powder at Marshall’s a couple weeks ago I took a closer look at the nutritional profile and was pretty impressed. A single tablespoon of the stuff contains a whopping 60% of your daily recommended iron intake! It’s also rich in antioxidants and vitamins A, B2, B6, C. It’s being investigated as a way to help end malnutrition in subtropical areas, which is super cool. Further research taught me that moringa has been used in Ayurvedic medicine for thousands of years for healing. Cool! Definitely a good addition to both face masks and smoothies. It’s got a pretty distinct “green” flavour, similar to that of spirulina or alfalfa, which isn’t relevant for the mask (hopefully!), but good to know if you’re buying a bag to use as a dietary supplement as well.

I got my moringa powder from Marshall’s for about $8, but I realize that’s not a very reliable shopping option. I also found it all over Amazon, with loads of different purchasing options. You might want to check out the bulk section at your local health food shop, too, so you don’t have to commit to a big bag of the stuff straight away. The plant you’re looking for is Moringa oleifera, and you want powder made from the leaf.


Moringa Face Mask

I whipped up this moringa face mask the day after returning from Philadelphia, where I met with my publisher and we took some pretty photos for my upcoming book (!). After many hours spent on airplanes and in airports, jumping from dry to humid to dry again, and days of wearing a whole lotta makeup, I was craving some serious clay cleansing. This is what I came up with.

The ingredients are simple enough. I started with a simple mix of gentle white white kaolin clay and water, and to that I added some raw honey and some moringa leaf powder. These four ingredients came together to make a lovely light green paste that left my complexion refreshed and brighter. Bye bye, plane scum!

I chose a raw honey I brought back from Costa Rica. It’s a ruddy dark brown colour and quite thin for honey. I purchased it at a wee farmers market and the lady who sold it to me explained in a combination of English and Spanish that the bees harvested the pollen from a special plant in the rain forest to make this dark, medicinal honey. She told me it was the sort of thing kids would be given when they were sick as a sort of cough syrup, so I thought it would be fantastic to add a healing boost to my mask. I’m assuming most of you don’t have this rather odd honey at home, but any raw honey will work as well.

Up next, moringa powder. Moringa is something else I first heard about in Costa Rica, from a Canadian ex-pat who spoke of it with infomercial like excitement. My interest was piqued, so when I saw a bag of moringa leaf powder at Marshall’s a couple weeks ago I took a closer look at the nutritional profile and was pretty impressed. A single tablespoon of the stuff contains a whopping 60% of your daily recommended iron intake! It’s also rich in antioxidants and vitamins A, B2, B6, C. It’s being investigated as a way to help end malnutrition in subtropical areas, which is super cool. Further research taught me that moringa has been used in Ayurvedic medicine for thousands of years for healing. Cool! Definitely a good addition to both face masks and smoothies. It’s got a pretty distinct “green” flavour, similar to that of spirulina or alfalfa, which isn’t relevant for the mask (hopefully!), but good to know if you’re buying a bag to use as a dietary supplement as well.

I got my moringa powder from Marshall’s for about $8, but I realize that’s not a very reliable shopping option. I also found it all over Amazon, with loads of different purchasing options. You might want to check out the bulk section at your local health food shop, too, so you don’t have to commit to a big bag of the stuff straight away. The plant you’re looking for is Moringa oleifera, and you want powder made from the leaf.


Moringa Face Mask

I whipped up this moringa face mask the day after returning from Philadelphia, where I met with my publisher and we took some pretty photos for my upcoming book (!). After many hours spent on airplanes and in airports, jumping from dry to humid to dry again, and days of wearing a whole lotta makeup, I was craving some serious clay cleansing. This is what I came up with.

The ingredients are simple enough. I started with a simple mix of gentle white white kaolin clay and water, and to that I added some raw honey and some moringa leaf powder. These four ingredients came together to make a lovely light green paste that left my complexion refreshed and brighter. Bye bye, plane scum!

I chose a raw honey I brought back from Costa Rica. It’s a ruddy dark brown colour and quite thin for honey. I purchased it at a wee farmers market and the lady who sold it to me explained in a combination of English and Spanish that the bees harvested the pollen from a special plant in the rain forest to make this dark, medicinal honey. She told me it was the sort of thing kids would be given when they were sick as a sort of cough syrup, so I thought it would be fantastic to add a healing boost to my mask. I’m assuming most of you don’t have this rather odd honey at home, but any raw honey will work as well.

Up next, moringa powder. Moringa is something else I first heard about in Costa Rica, from a Canadian ex-pat who spoke of it with infomercial like excitement. My interest was piqued, so when I saw a bag of moringa leaf powder at Marshall’s a couple weeks ago I took a closer look at the nutritional profile and was pretty impressed. A single tablespoon of the stuff contains a whopping 60% of your daily recommended iron intake! It’s also rich in antioxidants and vitamins A, B2, B6, C. It’s being investigated as a way to help end malnutrition in subtropical areas, which is super cool. Further research taught me that moringa has been used in Ayurvedic medicine for thousands of years for healing. Cool! Definitely a good addition to both face masks and smoothies. It’s got a pretty distinct “green” flavour, similar to that of spirulina or alfalfa, which isn’t relevant for the mask (hopefully!), but good to know if you’re buying a bag to use as a dietary supplement as well.

I got my moringa powder from Marshall’s for about $8, but I realize that’s not a very reliable shopping option. I also found it all over Amazon, with loads of different purchasing options. You might want to check out the bulk section at your local health food shop, too, so you don’t have to commit to a big bag of the stuff straight away. The plant you’re looking for is Moringa oleifera, and you want powder made from the leaf.


Moringa Face Mask

I whipped up this moringa face mask the day after returning from Philadelphia, where I met with my publisher and we took some pretty photos for my upcoming book (!). After many hours spent on airplanes and in airports, jumping from dry to humid to dry again, and days of wearing a whole lotta makeup, I was craving some serious clay cleansing. This is what I came up with.

The ingredients are simple enough. I started with a simple mix of gentle white white kaolin clay and water, and to that I added some raw honey and some moringa leaf powder. These four ingredients came together to make a lovely light green paste that left my complexion refreshed and brighter. Bye bye, plane scum!

I chose a raw honey I brought back from Costa Rica. It’s a ruddy dark brown colour and quite thin for honey. I purchased it at a wee farmers market and the lady who sold it to me explained in a combination of English and Spanish that the bees harvested the pollen from a special plant in the rain forest to make this dark, medicinal honey. She told me it was the sort of thing kids would be given when they were sick as a sort of cough syrup, so I thought it would be fantastic to add a healing boost to my mask. I’m assuming most of you don’t have this rather odd honey at home, but any raw honey will work as well.

Up next, moringa powder. Moringa is something else I first heard about in Costa Rica, from a Canadian ex-pat who spoke of it with infomercial like excitement. My interest was piqued, so when I saw a bag of moringa leaf powder at Marshall’s a couple weeks ago I took a closer look at the nutritional profile and was pretty impressed. A single tablespoon of the stuff contains a whopping 60% of your daily recommended iron intake! It’s also rich in antioxidants and vitamins A, B2, B6, C. It’s being investigated as a way to help end malnutrition in subtropical areas, which is super cool. Further research taught me that moringa has been used in Ayurvedic medicine for thousands of years for healing. Cool! Definitely a good addition to both face masks and smoothies. It’s got a pretty distinct “green” flavour, similar to that of spirulina or alfalfa, which isn’t relevant for the mask (hopefully!), but good to know if you’re buying a bag to use as a dietary supplement as well.

I got my moringa powder from Marshall’s for about $8, but I realize that’s not a very reliable shopping option. I also found it all over Amazon, with loads of different purchasing options. You might want to check out the bulk section at your local health food shop, too, so you don’t have to commit to a big bag of the stuff straight away. The plant you’re looking for is Moringa oleifera, and you want powder made from the leaf.


Moringa Face Mask

I whipped up this moringa face mask the day after returning from Philadelphia, where I met with my publisher and we took some pretty photos for my upcoming book (!). After many hours spent on airplanes and in airports, jumping from dry to humid to dry again, and days of wearing a whole lotta makeup, I was craving some serious clay cleansing. This is what I came up with.

The ingredients are simple enough. I started with a simple mix of gentle white white kaolin clay and water, and to that I added some raw honey and some moringa leaf powder. These four ingredients came together to make a lovely light green paste that left my complexion refreshed and brighter. Bye bye, plane scum!

I chose a raw honey I brought back from Costa Rica. It’s a ruddy dark brown colour and quite thin for honey. I purchased it at a wee farmers market and the lady who sold it to me explained in a combination of English and Spanish that the bees harvested the pollen from a special plant in the rain forest to make this dark, medicinal honey. She told me it was the sort of thing kids would be given when they were sick as a sort of cough syrup, so I thought it would be fantastic to add a healing boost to my mask. I’m assuming most of you don’t have this rather odd honey at home, but any raw honey will work as well.

Up next, moringa powder. Moringa is something else I first heard about in Costa Rica, from a Canadian ex-pat who spoke of it with infomercial like excitement. My interest was piqued, so when I saw a bag of moringa leaf powder at Marshall’s a couple weeks ago I took a closer look at the nutritional profile and was pretty impressed. A single tablespoon of the stuff contains a whopping 60% of your daily recommended iron intake! It’s also rich in antioxidants and vitamins A, B2, B6, C. It’s being investigated as a way to help end malnutrition in subtropical areas, which is super cool. Further research taught me that moringa has been used in Ayurvedic medicine for thousands of years for healing. Cool! Definitely a good addition to both face masks and smoothies. It’s got a pretty distinct “green” flavour, similar to that of spirulina or alfalfa, which isn’t relevant for the mask (hopefully!), but good to know if you’re buying a bag to use as a dietary supplement as well.

I got my moringa powder from Marshall’s for about $8, but I realize that’s not a very reliable shopping option. I also found it all over Amazon, with loads of different purchasing options. You might want to check out the bulk section at your local health food shop, too, so you don’t have to commit to a big bag of the stuff straight away. The plant you’re looking for is Moringa oleifera, and you want powder made from the leaf.



Comments:

  1. Blathma

    Wasted labor.

  2. Fetaur

    WATCH EVERYONE! JUST SUPER !!!

  3. Nejinn

    Hooray! and thanks!)))

  4. Rafiki

    It agree, rather useful phrase

  5. Donkor

    What a lovely question

  6. Neleus

    Smiled thanks ...

  7. Long

    Thank you :) Cool topic, write more often - you are doing great

  8. Faut

    remarkably, this funny message



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