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Disney’s Magic Kingdom Just Started Serving Booze at Its Last ‘Dry’ Restaurants

Disney’s Magic Kingdom Just Started Serving Booze at Its Last ‘Dry’ Restaurants


Magic Kingdom restaurants were previously dry, at the request of Walt Disney

Yelp/Crystal Palace

Disney World has finally made all of the restaurants in their Magic Kingdom alcohol-friendly for guests 21 years and up.

Disney World’s Magic Kingdom restaurants were all dry until 2012, when Be Our Guest restaurant opened with alcohol on the menu. In just six years, the rest of the park’s restaurants have caught up with public demand — the park’s final booze-free restaurants will begin serving drinks to anyone 21 years and up.

It has been announced that Crystal Palace and the Plaza Restaurant will be serving an assortment of alcoholic beverages, including beer, wine, and specialty cocktails. The Crystal Palace, which hosts a Winnie the Pooh and Friends character buffet, will offer three different kinds of beer, a cider, multiple wine offerings, and a mimosa made with Domaine Ste. Michelle bubbly.

The Plaza Restaurant offers much of the same, though their signature cocktail is a sangria made with Kenwood Sauvignon Blanc, pineapple juice, spice, and fruit. Currently, the park’s counter service locations do not serve alcohol, but they do serve a variety of tasty treats that have garnered cult followings. You can read all about them and others here on The Daily Meal’s Disney World for food lovers.


Booze flows at every restaurant in Disney World for first time

The Na’vi Shaman of Songs celebrates with music in Na’vi River Journey ride at Pandora-World of Avatar land attraction in Disney’s Animal Kingdom theme park at Walt Disney World in Lake Buena Vista, Fla., in 2017. Much to its founder’s dismay, every sit-down restaurant in Orlando, Fla.’s original Disney World park is now serving booze.

The Prohibition era has almost totally ended at the Magic Kingdom.

Much to its founder&rsquos dismay, every sit-down restaurant in Orlando, Fla.&rsquos original Disney World park is now serving booze.

Actually, we don&rsquot know for sure how Walt Disney would feel. He was very concerned about rowdies boozing it up at his park, but his views might have changed were he still with us at age 116.

Maybe he would order the $9.50 Beso del Sol Sangria at Cinderella&rsquos Royal Table. Until a few days ago, that was one of three alcohol-free restaurants left at the Magic Kingdom.

Then Disney announced The Plaza Restaurant, The Crystal Palace and Cinderella&rsquos Royal Table would start offering beer and wine. They were the last restaurants where teetotaler families could dine in a booze-free atmosphere.

Somewhere (perhaps under Cinderella Castle) the man who started it all is doing 360s.

&ldquoNo liquor, no beer, nothing. Because that brings in a rowdy element. That brings people that we don&rsquot want and I feel they don&rsquot need it.&rdquo

That&rsquos what he told the Saturday Evening Post in 1956, a year after Disneyland opened.

Times have changed, of course. When Disneyland opened, an admission ticket cost $1 and the most expensive ride required a 30-cent ticket.

Now it costs $129 to get into Disney World&rsquos Magic Kingdom for a day.

Walt Disney might have changed with the times and raised a toast to the latest booze news. It&rsquos really a symbolic retreat from his original vision.

Disneyland in Anaheim, Calif., still does not offer alcohol to the general public. But Orlando&rsquos Walt Disney World parks such as Animal Kingdom, Hollywood Studios and Epcot have long offered booze.

The Magic Kingdom, however, was Walt&rsquos baby. When it opened in 1971, there was a strict no-alcohol policy.

It remained that way until 2012, when the Be Our Guest restaurant opened. For the first time, guests could open a menu and order some hooch.

Four more Magic Kingdom restaurants started serving alcohol in 2016. Disney said it was responding to the requests of guests, none of whom were named Walt Disney.

Quick-service restaurants in the Magic Kingdom still do not serve alcohol. But the final three restaurants that adhered to Disney&rsquos 1956-era vision are gone.

Now the Magic Kingdom is indeed a place where dreams come true. At least if you dream of having a mimosa with any meal.

Click here to see our full coverage of the coronavirus outbreak. Submit your coronavirus news tip.


Booze flows at every restaurant in Disney World for first time

The Na’vi Shaman of Songs celebrates with music in Na’vi River Journey ride at Pandora-World of Avatar land attraction in Disney’s Animal Kingdom theme park at Walt Disney World in Lake Buena Vista, Fla., in 2017. Much to its founder’s dismay, every sit-down restaurant in Orlando, Fla.’s original Disney World park is now serving booze.

The Prohibition era has almost totally ended at the Magic Kingdom.

Much to its founder&rsquos dismay, every sit-down restaurant in Orlando, Fla.&rsquos original Disney World park is now serving booze.

Actually, we don&rsquot know for sure how Walt Disney would feel. He was very concerned about rowdies boozing it up at his park, but his views might have changed were he still with us at age 116.

Maybe he would order the $9.50 Beso del Sol Sangria at Cinderella&rsquos Royal Table. Until a few days ago, that was one of three alcohol-free restaurants left at the Magic Kingdom.

Then Disney announced The Plaza Restaurant, The Crystal Palace and Cinderella&rsquos Royal Table would start offering beer and wine. They were the last restaurants where teetotaler families could dine in a booze-free atmosphere.

Somewhere (perhaps under Cinderella Castle) the man who started it all is doing 360s.

&ldquoNo liquor, no beer, nothing. Because that brings in a rowdy element. That brings people that we don&rsquot want and I feel they don&rsquot need it.&rdquo

That&rsquos what he told the Saturday Evening Post in 1956, a year after Disneyland opened.

Times have changed, of course. When Disneyland opened, an admission ticket cost $1 and the most expensive ride required a 30-cent ticket.

Now it costs $129 to get into Disney World&rsquos Magic Kingdom for a day.

Walt Disney might have changed with the times and raised a toast to the latest booze news. It&rsquos really a symbolic retreat from his original vision.

Disneyland in Anaheim, Calif., still does not offer alcohol to the general public. But Orlando&rsquos Walt Disney World parks such as Animal Kingdom, Hollywood Studios and Epcot have long offered booze.

The Magic Kingdom, however, was Walt&rsquos baby. When it opened in 1971, there was a strict no-alcohol policy.

It remained that way until 2012, when the Be Our Guest restaurant opened. For the first time, guests could open a menu and order some hooch.

Four more Magic Kingdom restaurants started serving alcohol in 2016. Disney said it was responding to the requests of guests, none of whom were named Walt Disney.

Quick-service restaurants in the Magic Kingdom still do not serve alcohol. But the final three restaurants that adhered to Disney&rsquos 1956-era vision are gone.

Now the Magic Kingdom is indeed a place where dreams come true. At least if you dream of having a mimosa with any meal.

Click here to see our full coverage of the coronavirus outbreak. Submit your coronavirus news tip.


Booze flows at every restaurant in Disney World for first time

The Na’vi Shaman of Songs celebrates with music in Na’vi River Journey ride at Pandora-World of Avatar land attraction in Disney’s Animal Kingdom theme park at Walt Disney World in Lake Buena Vista, Fla., in 2017. Much to its founder’s dismay, every sit-down restaurant in Orlando, Fla.’s original Disney World park is now serving booze.

The Prohibition era has almost totally ended at the Magic Kingdom.

Much to its founder&rsquos dismay, every sit-down restaurant in Orlando, Fla.&rsquos original Disney World park is now serving booze.

Actually, we don&rsquot know for sure how Walt Disney would feel. He was very concerned about rowdies boozing it up at his park, but his views might have changed were he still with us at age 116.

Maybe he would order the $9.50 Beso del Sol Sangria at Cinderella&rsquos Royal Table. Until a few days ago, that was one of three alcohol-free restaurants left at the Magic Kingdom.

Then Disney announced The Plaza Restaurant, The Crystal Palace and Cinderella&rsquos Royal Table would start offering beer and wine. They were the last restaurants where teetotaler families could dine in a booze-free atmosphere.

Somewhere (perhaps under Cinderella Castle) the man who started it all is doing 360s.

&ldquoNo liquor, no beer, nothing. Because that brings in a rowdy element. That brings people that we don&rsquot want and I feel they don&rsquot need it.&rdquo

That&rsquos what he told the Saturday Evening Post in 1956, a year after Disneyland opened.

Times have changed, of course. When Disneyland opened, an admission ticket cost $1 and the most expensive ride required a 30-cent ticket.

Now it costs $129 to get into Disney World&rsquos Magic Kingdom for a day.

Walt Disney might have changed with the times and raised a toast to the latest booze news. It&rsquos really a symbolic retreat from his original vision.

Disneyland in Anaheim, Calif., still does not offer alcohol to the general public. But Orlando&rsquos Walt Disney World parks such as Animal Kingdom, Hollywood Studios and Epcot have long offered booze.

The Magic Kingdom, however, was Walt&rsquos baby. When it opened in 1971, there was a strict no-alcohol policy.

It remained that way until 2012, when the Be Our Guest restaurant opened. For the first time, guests could open a menu and order some hooch.

Four more Magic Kingdom restaurants started serving alcohol in 2016. Disney said it was responding to the requests of guests, none of whom were named Walt Disney.

Quick-service restaurants in the Magic Kingdom still do not serve alcohol. But the final three restaurants that adhered to Disney&rsquos 1956-era vision are gone.

Now the Magic Kingdom is indeed a place where dreams come true. At least if you dream of having a mimosa with any meal.

Click here to see our full coverage of the coronavirus outbreak. Submit your coronavirus news tip.


Booze flows at every restaurant in Disney World for first time

The Na’vi Shaman of Songs celebrates with music in Na’vi River Journey ride at Pandora-World of Avatar land attraction in Disney’s Animal Kingdom theme park at Walt Disney World in Lake Buena Vista, Fla., in 2017. Much to its founder’s dismay, every sit-down restaurant in Orlando, Fla.’s original Disney World park is now serving booze.

The Prohibition era has almost totally ended at the Magic Kingdom.

Much to its founder&rsquos dismay, every sit-down restaurant in Orlando, Fla.&rsquos original Disney World park is now serving booze.

Actually, we don&rsquot know for sure how Walt Disney would feel. He was very concerned about rowdies boozing it up at his park, but his views might have changed were he still with us at age 116.

Maybe he would order the $9.50 Beso del Sol Sangria at Cinderella&rsquos Royal Table. Until a few days ago, that was one of three alcohol-free restaurants left at the Magic Kingdom.

Then Disney announced The Plaza Restaurant, The Crystal Palace and Cinderella&rsquos Royal Table would start offering beer and wine. They were the last restaurants where teetotaler families could dine in a booze-free atmosphere.

Somewhere (perhaps under Cinderella Castle) the man who started it all is doing 360s.

&ldquoNo liquor, no beer, nothing. Because that brings in a rowdy element. That brings people that we don&rsquot want and I feel they don&rsquot need it.&rdquo

That&rsquos what he told the Saturday Evening Post in 1956, a year after Disneyland opened.

Times have changed, of course. When Disneyland opened, an admission ticket cost $1 and the most expensive ride required a 30-cent ticket.

Now it costs $129 to get into Disney World&rsquos Magic Kingdom for a day.

Walt Disney might have changed with the times and raised a toast to the latest booze news. It&rsquos really a symbolic retreat from his original vision.

Disneyland in Anaheim, Calif., still does not offer alcohol to the general public. But Orlando&rsquos Walt Disney World parks such as Animal Kingdom, Hollywood Studios and Epcot have long offered booze.

The Magic Kingdom, however, was Walt&rsquos baby. When it opened in 1971, there was a strict no-alcohol policy.

It remained that way until 2012, when the Be Our Guest restaurant opened. For the first time, guests could open a menu and order some hooch.

Four more Magic Kingdom restaurants started serving alcohol in 2016. Disney said it was responding to the requests of guests, none of whom were named Walt Disney.

Quick-service restaurants in the Magic Kingdom still do not serve alcohol. But the final three restaurants that adhered to Disney&rsquos 1956-era vision are gone.

Now the Magic Kingdom is indeed a place where dreams come true. At least if you dream of having a mimosa with any meal.

Click here to see our full coverage of the coronavirus outbreak. Submit your coronavirus news tip.


Booze flows at every restaurant in Disney World for first time

The Na’vi Shaman of Songs celebrates with music in Na’vi River Journey ride at Pandora-World of Avatar land attraction in Disney’s Animal Kingdom theme park at Walt Disney World in Lake Buena Vista, Fla., in 2017. Much to its founder’s dismay, every sit-down restaurant in Orlando, Fla.’s original Disney World park is now serving booze.

The Prohibition era has almost totally ended at the Magic Kingdom.

Much to its founder&rsquos dismay, every sit-down restaurant in Orlando, Fla.&rsquos original Disney World park is now serving booze.

Actually, we don&rsquot know for sure how Walt Disney would feel. He was very concerned about rowdies boozing it up at his park, but his views might have changed were he still with us at age 116.

Maybe he would order the $9.50 Beso del Sol Sangria at Cinderella&rsquos Royal Table. Until a few days ago, that was one of three alcohol-free restaurants left at the Magic Kingdom.

Then Disney announced The Plaza Restaurant, The Crystal Palace and Cinderella&rsquos Royal Table would start offering beer and wine. They were the last restaurants where teetotaler families could dine in a booze-free atmosphere.

Somewhere (perhaps under Cinderella Castle) the man who started it all is doing 360s.

&ldquoNo liquor, no beer, nothing. Because that brings in a rowdy element. That brings people that we don&rsquot want and I feel they don&rsquot need it.&rdquo

That&rsquos what he told the Saturday Evening Post in 1956, a year after Disneyland opened.

Times have changed, of course. When Disneyland opened, an admission ticket cost $1 and the most expensive ride required a 30-cent ticket.

Now it costs $129 to get into Disney World&rsquos Magic Kingdom for a day.

Walt Disney might have changed with the times and raised a toast to the latest booze news. It&rsquos really a symbolic retreat from his original vision.

Disneyland in Anaheim, Calif., still does not offer alcohol to the general public. But Orlando&rsquos Walt Disney World parks such as Animal Kingdom, Hollywood Studios and Epcot have long offered booze.

The Magic Kingdom, however, was Walt&rsquos baby. When it opened in 1971, there was a strict no-alcohol policy.

It remained that way until 2012, when the Be Our Guest restaurant opened. For the first time, guests could open a menu and order some hooch.

Four more Magic Kingdom restaurants started serving alcohol in 2016. Disney said it was responding to the requests of guests, none of whom were named Walt Disney.

Quick-service restaurants in the Magic Kingdom still do not serve alcohol. But the final three restaurants that adhered to Disney&rsquos 1956-era vision are gone.

Now the Magic Kingdom is indeed a place where dreams come true. At least if you dream of having a mimosa with any meal.

Click here to see our full coverage of the coronavirus outbreak. Submit your coronavirus news tip.


Booze flows at every restaurant in Disney World for first time

The Na’vi Shaman of Songs celebrates with music in Na’vi River Journey ride at Pandora-World of Avatar land attraction in Disney’s Animal Kingdom theme park at Walt Disney World in Lake Buena Vista, Fla., in 2017. Much to its founder’s dismay, every sit-down restaurant in Orlando, Fla.’s original Disney World park is now serving booze.

The Prohibition era has almost totally ended at the Magic Kingdom.

Much to its founder&rsquos dismay, every sit-down restaurant in Orlando, Fla.&rsquos original Disney World park is now serving booze.

Actually, we don&rsquot know for sure how Walt Disney would feel. He was very concerned about rowdies boozing it up at his park, but his views might have changed were he still with us at age 116.

Maybe he would order the $9.50 Beso del Sol Sangria at Cinderella&rsquos Royal Table. Until a few days ago, that was one of three alcohol-free restaurants left at the Magic Kingdom.

Then Disney announced The Plaza Restaurant, The Crystal Palace and Cinderella&rsquos Royal Table would start offering beer and wine. They were the last restaurants where teetotaler families could dine in a booze-free atmosphere.

Somewhere (perhaps under Cinderella Castle) the man who started it all is doing 360s.

&ldquoNo liquor, no beer, nothing. Because that brings in a rowdy element. That brings people that we don&rsquot want and I feel they don&rsquot need it.&rdquo

That&rsquos what he told the Saturday Evening Post in 1956, a year after Disneyland opened.

Times have changed, of course. When Disneyland opened, an admission ticket cost $1 and the most expensive ride required a 30-cent ticket.

Now it costs $129 to get into Disney World&rsquos Magic Kingdom for a day.

Walt Disney might have changed with the times and raised a toast to the latest booze news. It&rsquos really a symbolic retreat from his original vision.

Disneyland in Anaheim, Calif., still does not offer alcohol to the general public. But Orlando&rsquos Walt Disney World parks such as Animal Kingdom, Hollywood Studios and Epcot have long offered booze.

The Magic Kingdom, however, was Walt&rsquos baby. When it opened in 1971, there was a strict no-alcohol policy.

It remained that way until 2012, when the Be Our Guest restaurant opened. For the first time, guests could open a menu and order some hooch.

Four more Magic Kingdom restaurants started serving alcohol in 2016. Disney said it was responding to the requests of guests, none of whom were named Walt Disney.

Quick-service restaurants in the Magic Kingdom still do not serve alcohol. But the final three restaurants that adhered to Disney&rsquos 1956-era vision are gone.

Now the Magic Kingdom is indeed a place where dreams come true. At least if you dream of having a mimosa with any meal.

Click here to see our full coverage of the coronavirus outbreak. Submit your coronavirus news tip.


Booze flows at every restaurant in Disney World for first time

The Na’vi Shaman of Songs celebrates with music in Na’vi River Journey ride at Pandora-World of Avatar land attraction in Disney’s Animal Kingdom theme park at Walt Disney World in Lake Buena Vista, Fla., in 2017. Much to its founder’s dismay, every sit-down restaurant in Orlando, Fla.’s original Disney World park is now serving booze.

The Prohibition era has almost totally ended at the Magic Kingdom.

Much to its founder&rsquos dismay, every sit-down restaurant in Orlando, Fla.&rsquos original Disney World park is now serving booze.

Actually, we don&rsquot know for sure how Walt Disney would feel. He was very concerned about rowdies boozing it up at his park, but his views might have changed were he still with us at age 116.

Maybe he would order the $9.50 Beso del Sol Sangria at Cinderella&rsquos Royal Table. Until a few days ago, that was one of three alcohol-free restaurants left at the Magic Kingdom.

Then Disney announced The Plaza Restaurant, The Crystal Palace and Cinderella&rsquos Royal Table would start offering beer and wine. They were the last restaurants where teetotaler families could dine in a booze-free atmosphere.

Somewhere (perhaps under Cinderella Castle) the man who started it all is doing 360s.

&ldquoNo liquor, no beer, nothing. Because that brings in a rowdy element. That brings people that we don&rsquot want and I feel they don&rsquot need it.&rdquo

That&rsquos what he told the Saturday Evening Post in 1956, a year after Disneyland opened.

Times have changed, of course. When Disneyland opened, an admission ticket cost $1 and the most expensive ride required a 30-cent ticket.

Now it costs $129 to get into Disney World&rsquos Magic Kingdom for a day.

Walt Disney might have changed with the times and raised a toast to the latest booze news. It&rsquos really a symbolic retreat from his original vision.

Disneyland in Anaheim, Calif., still does not offer alcohol to the general public. But Orlando&rsquos Walt Disney World parks such as Animal Kingdom, Hollywood Studios and Epcot have long offered booze.

The Magic Kingdom, however, was Walt&rsquos baby. When it opened in 1971, there was a strict no-alcohol policy.

It remained that way until 2012, when the Be Our Guest restaurant opened. For the first time, guests could open a menu and order some hooch.

Four more Magic Kingdom restaurants started serving alcohol in 2016. Disney said it was responding to the requests of guests, none of whom were named Walt Disney.

Quick-service restaurants in the Magic Kingdom still do not serve alcohol. But the final three restaurants that adhered to Disney&rsquos 1956-era vision are gone.

Now the Magic Kingdom is indeed a place where dreams come true. At least if you dream of having a mimosa with any meal.

Click here to see our full coverage of the coronavirus outbreak. Submit your coronavirus news tip.


Booze flows at every restaurant in Disney World for first time

The Na’vi Shaman of Songs celebrates with music in Na’vi River Journey ride at Pandora-World of Avatar land attraction in Disney’s Animal Kingdom theme park at Walt Disney World in Lake Buena Vista, Fla., in 2017. Much to its founder’s dismay, every sit-down restaurant in Orlando, Fla.’s original Disney World park is now serving booze.

The Prohibition era has almost totally ended at the Magic Kingdom.

Much to its founder&rsquos dismay, every sit-down restaurant in Orlando, Fla.&rsquos original Disney World park is now serving booze.

Actually, we don&rsquot know for sure how Walt Disney would feel. He was very concerned about rowdies boozing it up at his park, but his views might have changed were he still with us at age 116.

Maybe he would order the $9.50 Beso del Sol Sangria at Cinderella&rsquos Royal Table. Until a few days ago, that was one of three alcohol-free restaurants left at the Magic Kingdom.

Then Disney announced The Plaza Restaurant, The Crystal Palace and Cinderella&rsquos Royal Table would start offering beer and wine. They were the last restaurants where teetotaler families could dine in a booze-free atmosphere.

Somewhere (perhaps under Cinderella Castle) the man who started it all is doing 360s.

&ldquoNo liquor, no beer, nothing. Because that brings in a rowdy element. That brings people that we don&rsquot want and I feel they don&rsquot need it.&rdquo

That&rsquos what he told the Saturday Evening Post in 1956, a year after Disneyland opened.

Times have changed, of course. When Disneyland opened, an admission ticket cost $1 and the most expensive ride required a 30-cent ticket.

Now it costs $129 to get into Disney World&rsquos Magic Kingdom for a day.

Walt Disney might have changed with the times and raised a toast to the latest booze news. It&rsquos really a symbolic retreat from his original vision.

Disneyland in Anaheim, Calif., still does not offer alcohol to the general public. But Orlando&rsquos Walt Disney World parks such as Animal Kingdom, Hollywood Studios and Epcot have long offered booze.

The Magic Kingdom, however, was Walt&rsquos baby. When it opened in 1971, there was a strict no-alcohol policy.

It remained that way until 2012, when the Be Our Guest restaurant opened. For the first time, guests could open a menu and order some hooch.

Four more Magic Kingdom restaurants started serving alcohol in 2016. Disney said it was responding to the requests of guests, none of whom were named Walt Disney.

Quick-service restaurants in the Magic Kingdom still do not serve alcohol. But the final three restaurants that adhered to Disney&rsquos 1956-era vision are gone.

Now the Magic Kingdom is indeed a place where dreams come true. At least if you dream of having a mimosa with any meal.

Click here to see our full coverage of the coronavirus outbreak. Submit your coronavirus news tip.


Booze flows at every restaurant in Disney World for first time

The Na’vi Shaman of Songs celebrates with music in Na’vi River Journey ride at Pandora-World of Avatar land attraction in Disney’s Animal Kingdom theme park at Walt Disney World in Lake Buena Vista, Fla., in 2017. Much to its founder’s dismay, every sit-down restaurant in Orlando, Fla.’s original Disney World park is now serving booze.

The Prohibition era has almost totally ended at the Magic Kingdom.

Much to its founder&rsquos dismay, every sit-down restaurant in Orlando, Fla.&rsquos original Disney World park is now serving booze.

Actually, we don&rsquot know for sure how Walt Disney would feel. He was very concerned about rowdies boozing it up at his park, but his views might have changed were he still with us at age 116.

Maybe he would order the $9.50 Beso del Sol Sangria at Cinderella&rsquos Royal Table. Until a few days ago, that was one of three alcohol-free restaurants left at the Magic Kingdom.

Then Disney announced The Plaza Restaurant, The Crystal Palace and Cinderella&rsquos Royal Table would start offering beer and wine. They were the last restaurants where teetotaler families could dine in a booze-free atmosphere.

Somewhere (perhaps under Cinderella Castle) the man who started it all is doing 360s.

&ldquoNo liquor, no beer, nothing. Because that brings in a rowdy element. That brings people that we don&rsquot want and I feel they don&rsquot need it.&rdquo

That&rsquos what he told the Saturday Evening Post in 1956, a year after Disneyland opened.

Times have changed, of course. When Disneyland opened, an admission ticket cost $1 and the most expensive ride required a 30-cent ticket.

Now it costs $129 to get into Disney World&rsquos Magic Kingdom for a day.

Walt Disney might have changed with the times and raised a toast to the latest booze news. It&rsquos really a symbolic retreat from his original vision.

Disneyland in Anaheim, Calif., still does not offer alcohol to the general public. But Orlando&rsquos Walt Disney World parks such as Animal Kingdom, Hollywood Studios and Epcot have long offered booze.

The Magic Kingdom, however, was Walt&rsquos baby. When it opened in 1971, there was a strict no-alcohol policy.

It remained that way until 2012, when the Be Our Guest restaurant opened. For the first time, guests could open a menu and order some hooch.

Four more Magic Kingdom restaurants started serving alcohol in 2016. Disney said it was responding to the requests of guests, none of whom were named Walt Disney.

Quick-service restaurants in the Magic Kingdom still do not serve alcohol. But the final three restaurants that adhered to Disney&rsquos 1956-era vision are gone.

Now the Magic Kingdom is indeed a place where dreams come true. At least if you dream of having a mimosa with any meal.

Click here to see our full coverage of the coronavirus outbreak. Submit your coronavirus news tip.


Booze flows at every restaurant in Disney World for first time

The Na’vi Shaman of Songs celebrates with music in Na’vi River Journey ride at Pandora-World of Avatar land attraction in Disney’s Animal Kingdom theme park at Walt Disney World in Lake Buena Vista, Fla., in 2017. Much to its founder’s dismay, every sit-down restaurant in Orlando, Fla.’s original Disney World park is now serving booze.

The Prohibition era has almost totally ended at the Magic Kingdom.

Much to its founder&rsquos dismay, every sit-down restaurant in Orlando, Fla.&rsquos original Disney World park is now serving booze.

Actually, we don&rsquot know for sure how Walt Disney would feel. He was very concerned about rowdies boozing it up at his park, but his views might have changed were he still with us at age 116.

Maybe he would order the $9.50 Beso del Sol Sangria at Cinderella&rsquos Royal Table. Until a few days ago, that was one of three alcohol-free restaurants left at the Magic Kingdom.

Then Disney announced The Plaza Restaurant, The Crystal Palace and Cinderella&rsquos Royal Table would start offering beer and wine. They were the last restaurants where teetotaler families could dine in a booze-free atmosphere.

Somewhere (perhaps under Cinderella Castle) the man who started it all is doing 360s.

&ldquoNo liquor, no beer, nothing. Because that brings in a rowdy element. That brings people that we don&rsquot want and I feel they don&rsquot need it.&rdquo

That&rsquos what he told the Saturday Evening Post in 1956, a year after Disneyland opened.

Times have changed, of course. When Disneyland opened, an admission ticket cost $1 and the most expensive ride required a 30-cent ticket.

Now it costs $129 to get into Disney World&rsquos Magic Kingdom for a day.

Walt Disney might have changed with the times and raised a toast to the latest booze news. It&rsquos really a symbolic retreat from his original vision.

Disneyland in Anaheim, Calif., still does not offer alcohol to the general public. But Orlando&rsquos Walt Disney World parks such as Animal Kingdom, Hollywood Studios and Epcot have long offered booze.

The Magic Kingdom, however, was Walt&rsquos baby. When it opened in 1971, there was a strict no-alcohol policy.

It remained that way until 2012, when the Be Our Guest restaurant opened. For the first time, guests could open a menu and order some hooch.

Four more Magic Kingdom restaurants started serving alcohol in 2016. Disney said it was responding to the requests of guests, none of whom were named Walt Disney.

Quick-service restaurants in the Magic Kingdom still do not serve alcohol. But the final three restaurants that adhered to Disney&rsquos 1956-era vision are gone.

Now the Magic Kingdom is indeed a place where dreams come true. At least if you dream of having a mimosa with any meal.

Click here to see our full coverage of the coronavirus outbreak. Submit your coronavirus news tip.


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