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Just Mayo, the Vegan Mayo Company, Is in Trouble with the FDA

Just Mayo, the Vegan Mayo Company, Is in Trouble with the FDA


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The FDA says that mayonnaise must contain eggs, so Hampton Creek’s Just Mayo needs a name change

Who knew that one condiment could cause so much controversy?

It would seem that Just Mayo, the vegan mayonnaise product produced by Hampton Creek, can’t catch a break. First, they were sued by Hellmann’s for calling their product mayo even though it doesn’t contain eggs. Now, although Hellmann’s has dropped its lawsuit against the vegan mayo company, the FDA has raised similar concerns.

According to federal law (no, really), mayonnaise has to contain eggs in order for it to be considered mayonnaise. The FDA has sent a letter to Hampton Creek telling the company to drop all mentions of the word “mayonnaise” from their product.

"The use of the term 'mayo' in the product names and the image of an egg may be misleading to consumers because it may lead them to believe that the products are the standardized food," wrote William Correll, director of the office of compliance for the FDA, in the letter.

In the past, Hampton Creek has argued that they never use the word “mayonnaise,” simply calling their product “mayo.” However, in the letter, the FDA states that most people have an understanding of “mayo” as an abbreviation of “mayonnaise.” Hampton Creek has not yet responded to this latest round of controversy.


FDA will let eggless Just Mayo stay 'mayo' – with a few small label changes

Just Mayo says it will get to keep its name, a decision that caps a rollercoaster year for the vegan spread that has rattled the egg industry.

After months of discussions, Just Mayo’s maker Hampton Creek says it
worked out an agreement with the Food and Drug Administration that
lets the eggless spread keep its name, as long as a few changes are
made to its label. The resolution comes after the FDA sent a warning
letter to Hampton Creek in August saying Just Mayo was misbranded
because mayonnaise is defined as having eggs.

Without providing details, the FDA said in statement it worked with
Hampton Creek to address the issues cited in its letter and that it
considers the matter to be resolved.

As part of the deal, Hampton Creek says Just Mayo’s label will make it
clear that the product does not contain eggs. The changes include
making the words “egg-free” larger and adding “Spread & Dressing”. An
image of an egg with a pea shoot inside will also be smaller.

The agreement would bring closure to one of the challenges in the past
year faced by Hampton Creek, a San Francisco startup that has made
headlines with its $120m in funding and a mission of improving
the food system with options that are healthier, more affordable and
better for the environment. The attention has been enough that the New
York Times declared “mayo” to be one of the “top new food words” of
2015 earlier this week.

The spotlight has also made Hampton Creek a target.

Last year, Hellmann’s mayonnaise maker Unilever filed a lawsuit saying
Just Mayo’s name was misleading. After facing backlash from Hampton
Creek supporters, Unilever dropped the suit.

Behind the scenes, Hampton Creek also raised concerns at the American
Egg Board, which promotes the egg industry and is responsible for the
“Incredible, Edible Egg” slogan. The group’s CEO, Joanne Ivy, tried to
stop the sale of Just Mayo at Whole Foods, according to emails
obtained through a public records request by Ryan Shapiro and Jeffrey
Light, Freedom of Information Act experts.

The attempt to stop Just Mayo’s sale raises regulatory issues because
the board is overseen by the US Department of Agriculture, making it
a quasi-governmental body. After The Guardian and the Associated Press reported on the emails, Ivy retired earlier than planned and the USDA began an
investigation into the egg board.

Josh Tetrick, CEO of Hampton Creek, said the company was able to find
common ground with the FDA over its label. He said it wasn’t about one
side winning or losing, but working together to create a “just food
system”.

Hampton Creek enlisted the help of Stuart Pape, a former attorney with
the FDA based in Washington DC who specializes in labeling and
regulatory issues at the law firm Polsinelli.

The letter from the FDA had also noted that Just Mayo contains
ingredients that are not permitted by the standard of identity for
mayonnaise. It also said that the product is not qualified to make
implied health claims that it can reduce the risk of heart disease.
Pape said that the formula for Just Mayo is not changing and that the
other labeling issues have been resolved.


FDA will let eggless Just Mayo stay 'mayo' – with a few small label changes

Just Mayo says it will get to keep its name, a decision that caps a rollercoaster year for the vegan spread that has rattled the egg industry.

After months of discussions, Just Mayo’s maker Hampton Creek says it
worked out an agreement with the Food and Drug Administration that
lets the eggless spread keep its name, as long as a few changes are
made to its label. The resolution comes after the FDA sent a warning
letter to Hampton Creek in August saying Just Mayo was misbranded
because mayonnaise is defined as having eggs.

Without providing details, the FDA said in statement it worked with
Hampton Creek to address the issues cited in its letter and that it
considers the matter to be resolved.

As part of the deal, Hampton Creek says Just Mayo’s label will make it
clear that the product does not contain eggs. The changes include
making the words “egg-free” larger and adding “Spread & Dressing”. An
image of an egg with a pea shoot inside will also be smaller.

The agreement would bring closure to one of the challenges in the past
year faced by Hampton Creek, a San Francisco startup that has made
headlines with its $120m in funding and a mission of improving
the food system with options that are healthier, more affordable and
better for the environment. The attention has been enough that the New
York Times declared “mayo” to be one of the “top new food words” of
2015 earlier this week.

The spotlight has also made Hampton Creek a target.

Last year, Hellmann’s mayonnaise maker Unilever filed a lawsuit saying
Just Mayo’s name was misleading. After facing backlash from Hampton
Creek supporters, Unilever dropped the suit.

Behind the scenes, Hampton Creek also raised concerns at the American
Egg Board, which promotes the egg industry and is responsible for the
“Incredible, Edible Egg” slogan. The group’s CEO, Joanne Ivy, tried to
stop the sale of Just Mayo at Whole Foods, according to emails
obtained through a public records request by Ryan Shapiro and Jeffrey
Light, Freedom of Information Act experts.

The attempt to stop Just Mayo’s sale raises regulatory issues because
the board is overseen by the US Department of Agriculture, making it
a quasi-governmental body. After The Guardian and the Associated Press reported on the emails, Ivy retired earlier than planned and the USDA began an
investigation into the egg board.

Josh Tetrick, CEO of Hampton Creek, said the company was able to find
common ground with the FDA over its label. He said it wasn’t about one
side winning or losing, but working together to create a “just food
system”.

Hampton Creek enlisted the help of Stuart Pape, a former attorney with
the FDA based in Washington DC who specializes in labeling and
regulatory issues at the law firm Polsinelli.

The letter from the FDA had also noted that Just Mayo contains
ingredients that are not permitted by the standard of identity for
mayonnaise. It also said that the product is not qualified to make
implied health claims that it can reduce the risk of heart disease.
Pape said that the formula for Just Mayo is not changing and that the
other labeling issues have been resolved.


FDA will let eggless Just Mayo stay 'mayo' – with a few small label changes

Just Mayo says it will get to keep its name, a decision that caps a rollercoaster year for the vegan spread that has rattled the egg industry.

After months of discussions, Just Mayo’s maker Hampton Creek says it
worked out an agreement with the Food and Drug Administration that
lets the eggless spread keep its name, as long as a few changes are
made to its label. The resolution comes after the FDA sent a warning
letter to Hampton Creek in August saying Just Mayo was misbranded
because mayonnaise is defined as having eggs.

Without providing details, the FDA said in statement it worked with
Hampton Creek to address the issues cited in its letter and that it
considers the matter to be resolved.

As part of the deal, Hampton Creek says Just Mayo’s label will make it
clear that the product does not contain eggs. The changes include
making the words “egg-free” larger and adding “Spread & Dressing”. An
image of an egg with a pea shoot inside will also be smaller.

The agreement would bring closure to one of the challenges in the past
year faced by Hampton Creek, a San Francisco startup that has made
headlines with its $120m in funding and a mission of improving
the food system with options that are healthier, more affordable and
better for the environment. The attention has been enough that the New
York Times declared “mayo” to be one of the “top new food words” of
2015 earlier this week.

The spotlight has also made Hampton Creek a target.

Last year, Hellmann’s mayonnaise maker Unilever filed a lawsuit saying
Just Mayo’s name was misleading. After facing backlash from Hampton
Creek supporters, Unilever dropped the suit.

Behind the scenes, Hampton Creek also raised concerns at the American
Egg Board, which promotes the egg industry and is responsible for the
“Incredible, Edible Egg” slogan. The group’s CEO, Joanne Ivy, tried to
stop the sale of Just Mayo at Whole Foods, according to emails
obtained through a public records request by Ryan Shapiro and Jeffrey
Light, Freedom of Information Act experts.

The attempt to stop Just Mayo’s sale raises regulatory issues because
the board is overseen by the US Department of Agriculture, making it
a quasi-governmental body. After The Guardian and the Associated Press reported on the emails, Ivy retired earlier than planned and the USDA began an
investigation into the egg board.

Josh Tetrick, CEO of Hampton Creek, said the company was able to find
common ground with the FDA over its label. He said it wasn’t about one
side winning or losing, but working together to create a “just food
system”.

Hampton Creek enlisted the help of Stuart Pape, a former attorney with
the FDA based in Washington DC who specializes in labeling and
regulatory issues at the law firm Polsinelli.

The letter from the FDA had also noted that Just Mayo contains
ingredients that are not permitted by the standard of identity for
mayonnaise. It also said that the product is not qualified to make
implied health claims that it can reduce the risk of heart disease.
Pape said that the formula for Just Mayo is not changing and that the
other labeling issues have been resolved.


FDA will let eggless Just Mayo stay 'mayo' – with a few small label changes

Just Mayo says it will get to keep its name, a decision that caps a rollercoaster year for the vegan spread that has rattled the egg industry.

After months of discussions, Just Mayo’s maker Hampton Creek says it
worked out an agreement with the Food and Drug Administration that
lets the eggless spread keep its name, as long as a few changes are
made to its label. The resolution comes after the FDA sent a warning
letter to Hampton Creek in August saying Just Mayo was misbranded
because mayonnaise is defined as having eggs.

Without providing details, the FDA said in statement it worked with
Hampton Creek to address the issues cited in its letter and that it
considers the matter to be resolved.

As part of the deal, Hampton Creek says Just Mayo’s label will make it
clear that the product does not contain eggs. The changes include
making the words “egg-free” larger and adding “Spread & Dressing”. An
image of an egg with a pea shoot inside will also be smaller.

The agreement would bring closure to one of the challenges in the past
year faced by Hampton Creek, a San Francisco startup that has made
headlines with its $120m in funding and a mission of improving
the food system with options that are healthier, more affordable and
better for the environment. The attention has been enough that the New
York Times declared “mayo” to be one of the “top new food words” of
2015 earlier this week.

The spotlight has also made Hampton Creek a target.

Last year, Hellmann’s mayonnaise maker Unilever filed a lawsuit saying
Just Mayo’s name was misleading. After facing backlash from Hampton
Creek supporters, Unilever dropped the suit.

Behind the scenes, Hampton Creek also raised concerns at the American
Egg Board, which promotes the egg industry and is responsible for the
“Incredible, Edible Egg” slogan. The group’s CEO, Joanne Ivy, tried to
stop the sale of Just Mayo at Whole Foods, according to emails
obtained through a public records request by Ryan Shapiro and Jeffrey
Light, Freedom of Information Act experts.

The attempt to stop Just Mayo’s sale raises regulatory issues because
the board is overseen by the US Department of Agriculture, making it
a quasi-governmental body. After The Guardian and the Associated Press reported on the emails, Ivy retired earlier than planned and the USDA began an
investigation into the egg board.

Josh Tetrick, CEO of Hampton Creek, said the company was able to find
common ground with the FDA over its label. He said it wasn’t about one
side winning or losing, but working together to create a “just food
system”.

Hampton Creek enlisted the help of Stuart Pape, a former attorney with
the FDA based in Washington DC who specializes in labeling and
regulatory issues at the law firm Polsinelli.

The letter from the FDA had also noted that Just Mayo contains
ingredients that are not permitted by the standard of identity for
mayonnaise. It also said that the product is not qualified to make
implied health claims that it can reduce the risk of heart disease.
Pape said that the formula for Just Mayo is not changing and that the
other labeling issues have been resolved.


FDA will let eggless Just Mayo stay 'mayo' – with a few small label changes

Just Mayo says it will get to keep its name, a decision that caps a rollercoaster year for the vegan spread that has rattled the egg industry.

After months of discussions, Just Mayo’s maker Hampton Creek says it
worked out an agreement with the Food and Drug Administration that
lets the eggless spread keep its name, as long as a few changes are
made to its label. The resolution comes after the FDA sent a warning
letter to Hampton Creek in August saying Just Mayo was misbranded
because mayonnaise is defined as having eggs.

Without providing details, the FDA said in statement it worked with
Hampton Creek to address the issues cited in its letter and that it
considers the matter to be resolved.

As part of the deal, Hampton Creek says Just Mayo’s label will make it
clear that the product does not contain eggs. The changes include
making the words “egg-free” larger and adding “Spread & Dressing”. An
image of an egg with a pea shoot inside will also be smaller.

The agreement would bring closure to one of the challenges in the past
year faced by Hampton Creek, a San Francisco startup that has made
headlines with its $120m in funding and a mission of improving
the food system with options that are healthier, more affordable and
better for the environment. The attention has been enough that the New
York Times declared “mayo” to be one of the “top new food words” of
2015 earlier this week.

The spotlight has also made Hampton Creek a target.

Last year, Hellmann’s mayonnaise maker Unilever filed a lawsuit saying
Just Mayo’s name was misleading. After facing backlash from Hampton
Creek supporters, Unilever dropped the suit.

Behind the scenes, Hampton Creek also raised concerns at the American
Egg Board, which promotes the egg industry and is responsible for the
“Incredible, Edible Egg” slogan. The group’s CEO, Joanne Ivy, tried to
stop the sale of Just Mayo at Whole Foods, according to emails
obtained through a public records request by Ryan Shapiro and Jeffrey
Light, Freedom of Information Act experts.

The attempt to stop Just Mayo’s sale raises regulatory issues because
the board is overseen by the US Department of Agriculture, making it
a quasi-governmental body. After The Guardian and the Associated Press reported on the emails, Ivy retired earlier than planned and the USDA began an
investigation into the egg board.

Josh Tetrick, CEO of Hampton Creek, said the company was able to find
common ground with the FDA over its label. He said it wasn’t about one
side winning or losing, but working together to create a “just food
system”.

Hampton Creek enlisted the help of Stuart Pape, a former attorney with
the FDA based in Washington DC who specializes in labeling and
regulatory issues at the law firm Polsinelli.

The letter from the FDA had also noted that Just Mayo contains
ingredients that are not permitted by the standard of identity for
mayonnaise. It also said that the product is not qualified to make
implied health claims that it can reduce the risk of heart disease.
Pape said that the formula for Just Mayo is not changing and that the
other labeling issues have been resolved.


FDA will let eggless Just Mayo stay 'mayo' – with a few small label changes

Just Mayo says it will get to keep its name, a decision that caps a rollercoaster year for the vegan spread that has rattled the egg industry.

After months of discussions, Just Mayo’s maker Hampton Creek says it
worked out an agreement with the Food and Drug Administration that
lets the eggless spread keep its name, as long as a few changes are
made to its label. The resolution comes after the FDA sent a warning
letter to Hampton Creek in August saying Just Mayo was misbranded
because mayonnaise is defined as having eggs.

Without providing details, the FDA said in statement it worked with
Hampton Creek to address the issues cited in its letter and that it
considers the matter to be resolved.

As part of the deal, Hampton Creek says Just Mayo’s label will make it
clear that the product does not contain eggs. The changes include
making the words “egg-free” larger and adding “Spread & Dressing”. An
image of an egg with a pea shoot inside will also be smaller.

The agreement would bring closure to one of the challenges in the past
year faced by Hampton Creek, a San Francisco startup that has made
headlines with its $120m in funding and a mission of improving
the food system with options that are healthier, more affordable and
better for the environment. The attention has been enough that the New
York Times declared “mayo” to be one of the “top new food words” of
2015 earlier this week.

The spotlight has also made Hampton Creek a target.

Last year, Hellmann’s mayonnaise maker Unilever filed a lawsuit saying
Just Mayo’s name was misleading. After facing backlash from Hampton
Creek supporters, Unilever dropped the suit.

Behind the scenes, Hampton Creek also raised concerns at the American
Egg Board, which promotes the egg industry and is responsible for the
“Incredible, Edible Egg” slogan. The group’s CEO, Joanne Ivy, tried to
stop the sale of Just Mayo at Whole Foods, according to emails
obtained through a public records request by Ryan Shapiro and Jeffrey
Light, Freedom of Information Act experts.

The attempt to stop Just Mayo’s sale raises regulatory issues because
the board is overseen by the US Department of Agriculture, making it
a quasi-governmental body. After The Guardian and the Associated Press reported on the emails, Ivy retired earlier than planned and the USDA began an
investigation into the egg board.

Josh Tetrick, CEO of Hampton Creek, said the company was able to find
common ground with the FDA over its label. He said it wasn’t about one
side winning or losing, but working together to create a “just food
system”.

Hampton Creek enlisted the help of Stuart Pape, a former attorney with
the FDA based in Washington DC who specializes in labeling and
regulatory issues at the law firm Polsinelli.

The letter from the FDA had also noted that Just Mayo contains
ingredients that are not permitted by the standard of identity for
mayonnaise. It also said that the product is not qualified to make
implied health claims that it can reduce the risk of heart disease.
Pape said that the formula for Just Mayo is not changing and that the
other labeling issues have been resolved.


FDA will let eggless Just Mayo stay 'mayo' – with a few small label changes

Just Mayo says it will get to keep its name, a decision that caps a rollercoaster year for the vegan spread that has rattled the egg industry.

After months of discussions, Just Mayo’s maker Hampton Creek says it
worked out an agreement with the Food and Drug Administration that
lets the eggless spread keep its name, as long as a few changes are
made to its label. The resolution comes after the FDA sent a warning
letter to Hampton Creek in August saying Just Mayo was misbranded
because mayonnaise is defined as having eggs.

Without providing details, the FDA said in statement it worked with
Hampton Creek to address the issues cited in its letter and that it
considers the matter to be resolved.

As part of the deal, Hampton Creek says Just Mayo’s label will make it
clear that the product does not contain eggs. The changes include
making the words “egg-free” larger and adding “Spread & Dressing”. An
image of an egg with a pea shoot inside will also be smaller.

The agreement would bring closure to one of the challenges in the past
year faced by Hampton Creek, a San Francisco startup that has made
headlines with its $120m in funding and a mission of improving
the food system with options that are healthier, more affordable and
better for the environment. The attention has been enough that the New
York Times declared “mayo” to be one of the “top new food words” of
2015 earlier this week.

The spotlight has also made Hampton Creek a target.

Last year, Hellmann’s mayonnaise maker Unilever filed a lawsuit saying
Just Mayo’s name was misleading. After facing backlash from Hampton
Creek supporters, Unilever dropped the suit.

Behind the scenes, Hampton Creek also raised concerns at the American
Egg Board, which promotes the egg industry and is responsible for the
“Incredible, Edible Egg” slogan. The group’s CEO, Joanne Ivy, tried to
stop the sale of Just Mayo at Whole Foods, according to emails
obtained through a public records request by Ryan Shapiro and Jeffrey
Light, Freedom of Information Act experts.

The attempt to stop Just Mayo’s sale raises regulatory issues because
the board is overseen by the US Department of Agriculture, making it
a quasi-governmental body. After The Guardian and the Associated Press reported on the emails, Ivy retired earlier than planned and the USDA began an
investigation into the egg board.

Josh Tetrick, CEO of Hampton Creek, said the company was able to find
common ground with the FDA over its label. He said it wasn’t about one
side winning or losing, but working together to create a “just food
system”.

Hampton Creek enlisted the help of Stuart Pape, a former attorney with
the FDA based in Washington DC who specializes in labeling and
regulatory issues at the law firm Polsinelli.

The letter from the FDA had also noted that Just Mayo contains
ingredients that are not permitted by the standard of identity for
mayonnaise. It also said that the product is not qualified to make
implied health claims that it can reduce the risk of heart disease.
Pape said that the formula for Just Mayo is not changing and that the
other labeling issues have been resolved.


FDA will let eggless Just Mayo stay 'mayo' – with a few small label changes

Just Mayo says it will get to keep its name, a decision that caps a rollercoaster year for the vegan spread that has rattled the egg industry.

After months of discussions, Just Mayo’s maker Hampton Creek says it
worked out an agreement with the Food and Drug Administration that
lets the eggless spread keep its name, as long as a few changes are
made to its label. The resolution comes after the FDA sent a warning
letter to Hampton Creek in August saying Just Mayo was misbranded
because mayonnaise is defined as having eggs.

Without providing details, the FDA said in statement it worked with
Hampton Creek to address the issues cited in its letter and that it
considers the matter to be resolved.

As part of the deal, Hampton Creek says Just Mayo’s label will make it
clear that the product does not contain eggs. The changes include
making the words “egg-free” larger and adding “Spread & Dressing”. An
image of an egg with a pea shoot inside will also be smaller.

The agreement would bring closure to one of the challenges in the past
year faced by Hampton Creek, a San Francisco startup that has made
headlines with its $120m in funding and a mission of improving
the food system with options that are healthier, more affordable and
better for the environment. The attention has been enough that the New
York Times declared “mayo” to be one of the “top new food words” of
2015 earlier this week.

The spotlight has also made Hampton Creek a target.

Last year, Hellmann’s mayonnaise maker Unilever filed a lawsuit saying
Just Mayo’s name was misleading. After facing backlash from Hampton
Creek supporters, Unilever dropped the suit.

Behind the scenes, Hampton Creek also raised concerns at the American
Egg Board, which promotes the egg industry and is responsible for the
“Incredible, Edible Egg” slogan. The group’s CEO, Joanne Ivy, tried to
stop the sale of Just Mayo at Whole Foods, according to emails
obtained through a public records request by Ryan Shapiro and Jeffrey
Light, Freedom of Information Act experts.

The attempt to stop Just Mayo’s sale raises regulatory issues because
the board is overseen by the US Department of Agriculture, making it
a quasi-governmental body. After The Guardian and the Associated Press reported on the emails, Ivy retired earlier than planned and the USDA began an
investigation into the egg board.

Josh Tetrick, CEO of Hampton Creek, said the company was able to find
common ground with the FDA over its label. He said it wasn’t about one
side winning or losing, but working together to create a “just food
system”.

Hampton Creek enlisted the help of Stuart Pape, a former attorney with
the FDA based in Washington DC who specializes in labeling and
regulatory issues at the law firm Polsinelli.

The letter from the FDA had also noted that Just Mayo contains
ingredients that are not permitted by the standard of identity for
mayonnaise. It also said that the product is not qualified to make
implied health claims that it can reduce the risk of heart disease.
Pape said that the formula for Just Mayo is not changing and that the
other labeling issues have been resolved.


FDA will let eggless Just Mayo stay 'mayo' – with a few small label changes

Just Mayo says it will get to keep its name, a decision that caps a rollercoaster year for the vegan spread that has rattled the egg industry.

After months of discussions, Just Mayo’s maker Hampton Creek says it
worked out an agreement with the Food and Drug Administration that
lets the eggless spread keep its name, as long as a few changes are
made to its label. The resolution comes after the FDA sent a warning
letter to Hampton Creek in August saying Just Mayo was misbranded
because mayonnaise is defined as having eggs.

Without providing details, the FDA said in statement it worked with
Hampton Creek to address the issues cited in its letter and that it
considers the matter to be resolved.

As part of the deal, Hampton Creek says Just Mayo’s label will make it
clear that the product does not contain eggs. The changes include
making the words “egg-free” larger and adding “Spread & Dressing”. An
image of an egg with a pea shoot inside will also be smaller.

The agreement would bring closure to one of the challenges in the past
year faced by Hampton Creek, a San Francisco startup that has made
headlines with its $120m in funding and a mission of improving
the food system with options that are healthier, more affordable and
better for the environment. The attention has been enough that the New
York Times declared “mayo” to be one of the “top new food words” of
2015 earlier this week.

The spotlight has also made Hampton Creek a target.

Last year, Hellmann’s mayonnaise maker Unilever filed a lawsuit saying
Just Mayo’s name was misleading. After facing backlash from Hampton
Creek supporters, Unilever dropped the suit.

Behind the scenes, Hampton Creek also raised concerns at the American
Egg Board, which promotes the egg industry and is responsible for the
“Incredible, Edible Egg” slogan. The group’s CEO, Joanne Ivy, tried to
stop the sale of Just Mayo at Whole Foods, according to emails
obtained through a public records request by Ryan Shapiro and Jeffrey
Light, Freedom of Information Act experts.

The attempt to stop Just Mayo’s sale raises regulatory issues because
the board is overseen by the US Department of Agriculture, making it
a quasi-governmental body. After The Guardian and the Associated Press reported on the emails, Ivy retired earlier than planned and the USDA began an
investigation into the egg board.

Josh Tetrick, CEO of Hampton Creek, said the company was able to find
common ground with the FDA over its label. He said it wasn’t about one
side winning or losing, but working together to create a “just food
system”.

Hampton Creek enlisted the help of Stuart Pape, a former attorney with
the FDA based in Washington DC who specializes in labeling and
regulatory issues at the law firm Polsinelli.

The letter from the FDA had also noted that Just Mayo contains
ingredients that are not permitted by the standard of identity for
mayonnaise. It also said that the product is not qualified to make
implied health claims that it can reduce the risk of heart disease.
Pape said that the formula for Just Mayo is not changing and that the
other labeling issues have been resolved.


FDA will let eggless Just Mayo stay 'mayo' – with a few small label changes

Just Mayo says it will get to keep its name, a decision that caps a rollercoaster year for the vegan spread that has rattled the egg industry.

After months of discussions, Just Mayo’s maker Hampton Creek says it
worked out an agreement with the Food and Drug Administration that
lets the eggless spread keep its name, as long as a few changes are
made to its label. The resolution comes after the FDA sent a warning
letter to Hampton Creek in August saying Just Mayo was misbranded
because mayonnaise is defined as having eggs.

Without providing details, the FDA said in statement it worked with
Hampton Creek to address the issues cited in its letter and that it
considers the matter to be resolved.

As part of the deal, Hampton Creek says Just Mayo’s label will make it
clear that the product does not contain eggs. The changes include
making the words “egg-free” larger and adding “Spread & Dressing”. An
image of an egg with a pea shoot inside will also be smaller.

The agreement would bring closure to one of the challenges in the past
year faced by Hampton Creek, a San Francisco startup that has made
headlines with its $120m in funding and a mission of improving
the food system with options that are healthier, more affordable and
better for the environment. The attention has been enough that the New
York Times declared “mayo” to be one of the “top new food words” of
2015 earlier this week.

The spotlight has also made Hampton Creek a target.

Last year, Hellmann’s mayonnaise maker Unilever filed a lawsuit saying
Just Mayo’s name was misleading. After facing backlash from Hampton
Creek supporters, Unilever dropped the suit.

Behind the scenes, Hampton Creek also raised concerns at the American
Egg Board, which promotes the egg industry and is responsible for the
“Incredible, Edible Egg” slogan. The group’s CEO, Joanne Ivy, tried to
stop the sale of Just Mayo at Whole Foods, according to emails
obtained through a public records request by Ryan Shapiro and Jeffrey
Light, Freedom of Information Act experts.

The attempt to stop Just Mayo’s sale raises regulatory issues because
the board is overseen by the US Department of Agriculture, making it
a quasi-governmental body. After The Guardian and the Associated Press reported on the emails, Ivy retired earlier than planned and the USDA began an
investigation into the egg board.

Josh Tetrick, CEO of Hampton Creek, said the company was able to find
common ground with the FDA over its label. He said it wasn’t about one
side winning or losing, but working together to create a “just food
system”.

Hampton Creek enlisted the help of Stuart Pape, a former attorney with
the FDA based in Washington DC who specializes in labeling and
regulatory issues at the law firm Polsinelli.

The letter from the FDA had also noted that Just Mayo contains
ingredients that are not permitted by the standard of identity for
mayonnaise. It also said that the product is not qualified to make
implied health claims that it can reduce the risk of heart disease.
Pape said that the formula for Just Mayo is not changing and that the
other labeling issues have been resolved.



Comments:

  1. Kakasa

    Are you aware of what wrote?

  2. Tavey

    I congratulate, excellent idea and it is duly

  3. Bradly

    A very fun idea

  4. Dillin

    What words ... Super different phrase

  5. Estefan

    Will you take me?



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