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Scrambled Eggs with Caramelized Onions and Chèvre

Scrambled Eggs with Caramelized Onions and Chèvre


If smoked paprika isn't your thing, you can use chile flakes or Aleppo pepper.

Ingredients

  • Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 2 tablespoons chèvre, crumbled
  • 2 tablespoons Big Batch of Caramelized Onions (click here for recipe)
  • Small pinch of smoked paprika
  • Whole parsley leaves (for serving)

Recipe Preparation

  • Whisk eggs in a medium bowl until frothy; season with salt and pepper. Stir in chèvre, reserving several crumbles for serving. Heat onions in a small nonstick skillet over medium-low heat until warm and pliable, about 2 minutes.

  • Heat oil in a separate nonstick skillet over medium-low heat. Add eggs and cook, stirring occasionally, until large curds form, about 2 minutes. Serve eggs dusted with paprika and topped with onions, remaining chèvre, and parsley leaves.

Nutritional Content

Calories (kcal) 200 Fat (g) 14 Saturated Fat (g) 4 Cholesterol (mg) 430 Carbohydrates (g) 2 Dietary Fiber (g) 0 Total Sugars (g) 0 Protein (g) 13 Sodium (mg) 380Reviews Section

Wild Mushroom, Leek & Chèvre Scrambled Eggs

1. In large skillet, heat oil over medium-high heat add mushrooms and cook 4 minutes or until almost tender, stirring occasionally. Add leeks cook 3 minutes or until mushrooms and leeks are tender, stirring occasionally. Stir in chives and tarragon cook 1 minute. Transfer mushroom mixture to bowl cover to keep warm.

2. In small microwave-safe bowl, heat 1 tablespoon butter in microwave oven on high 30 seconds or until melted.

3. In medium bowl, whisk eggs, salt, pepper and melted butter. In large nonstick skillet, melt remaining 1 tablespoon butter over medium heat. Add egg mixture cook 4 minutes or to desired doneness, stirring occasionally to scramble. Fold in cheese and mushroom mixture cook 1 minute or until heated through. Serve scrambled egg mixture with harissa.


Approximate nutritional values per serving:
270 Calories, 21g Fat (8g Saturated), 390mg Cholesterol,
329mg Sodium, 5g Carbohydrates, 1g Fiber, 15g Protein


Make a Perfect French Omelet Without Touching a Skillet

Most restaurant omelets are tough and flavorless, essentially scrambled eggs without the fluffy factor. Really, I think the only way to avoid eating an omelet that tastes like a spongy tortilla is to have a classic rolled French omelet. The French omelet is just barely firm and butter yellow on the outside, custardy on the inside. You might find a rolled omelet on a French brunch menu, but for the most part you’re on your own. While I’ll whip out a nonstick skillet and make the real deal every now and then, I typically go for a slight variation: a baked rolled omelet. Pouring beaten eggs onto a small baking sheet and cooking until just set creates a very similar texture to that of the real deal. As long as you don’t over-bake the eggs, this omelet method is pretty much completely foolproof.

Crack 2 eggs into a small bowl with a splash of milk, a fat pinch of kosher salt, and freshly ground black or white pepper. Use a whisk to beat the eggs for at least 30 seconds, until well combined—they don’t need to be frothy, but the egg yolks and whites should be fully incorporated.

Generously butter a toaster oven-sized sheet pan and preheat the oven (or toaster oven!) to 325ய. To make a bunch of baked rolled omelets at once, you stick several toaster oven-sized sheet pans in the oven, or you can use your typical rimmed sheet pan (and 8 eggs), which will make 4 omelets when the baked eggs are cut into quarters. Pour the eggs onto the sheet pan and bake until the eggs are just set, about 10-15 minutes.

Use a rubber spatula to cut around the edges of the pan and lift the eggs to make sure they’re not stuck to the baking sheet. Position the pan vertically and pile your favorite omelet fillings onto the eggs, about 2 inches from the bottom. If you’re looking for a few ideas, read on:


Gratinee Gratitude

Crockery crowned with a blistered dome of cheese and bread arrives straight from the broiler. The best French onion soup is never ladled from a pot it’s crafted into a layered experience. Excavating through the Gruyère, the first spoonful of still-too-hot onion slivers are unveiled. The steam’s herbal notes emerge, along with a hint of the wine that is sweetening the slurp-worthy bone broth.


“Soup” seems a tame name for a dish that provides entrée-like satisfaction, which lasts from the first crunchy blisters on top to the final, substantial cheese-thickened slurp. All that’s needed to make it dinner is crusty bread, unsalted cultured butter, lightly-dressed greens and a nondescript red table wine.

Onions started showing up in soups almost as soon as the Romans and other ancients started cultivating them. The poor people’s vegetable happened to boast numerous health-enhancing attributes. It’s no wonder that few of the world’s great soups don’t involve the onion family.

Soupe à l’Oignon Gratinée was a humble bistro favorite in France when the French cooking boom swept the United States in the early 60s. Jacqueline Kennedy hired a French White House chef, Julia Child was starting her television career and Gallic cuisine was haute. French onion soup caught on right away with Americans.

One of the world’s most beloved potages seems simple, but it often suffers from scorched or undercooked onions, salty store-bought broth, bread mush, the wrong cheese and the helter-skelter addition of other ingredients.

It Begins With Bouillon

An early black-and-white episode of public television’s “The French Chef” features a young Julia Child dishing on French onion soup and caramelizing onions. Her recipe in The French Chef Cookbook remains a great basic guide.

She starts with the most important ingredient. “To achieve the true homemade taste, you’ll need a homemade bouillon made from beef bones and shank meat simmered for several hours with the usual carrots, onions, celery, seasonings and herbs.”

Even using purchased beef, chicken or vegetable stock, the nuances can be pumped up by simmering with vegetables, wine and onion-friendly herbs like thyme. Flexible onion soup can easily become a vegetarian dish by substituting meatless broth.

FRENCH ONION DIP Lipton Onion Soup was introduced in 1952. It didn’t make particularly great onion soup, but it caught on in a big way when party hosts started combining the mix with sour cream as a quick dip.

Onion-centric soup recipes typically call for common yellow onions, but those are not the only, or the best, choice. Like corn on the cob, apples and tomatoes, today’s onions have gone super-sweet. Raw sweet yellow onions are mild-tasting, but lose flavor when cooked. To amplify the onion flavor and add complexity, a mix of yellow, white, red and Cipollini (chip-oh-lee-knee) onions, along with shallots, should be sautéed. Green onions and chives add an extra nuance as final soup garnishes.

Chiffonade, chunked, puréed or minced? How onions are cut changes the taste and texture of a soup. For classic French onion soup, thinly-sliced strands that cling to the cheese are needed. Puréed onions play an essential supporting role in smooth-textured preparations like Onion and Almond Soup.

Excuse For A Good Cry

Any cook’s initial French onion soup effort can be a revelation because of the overwhelming volume of raw onions required. The average American consumes about 20 pounds of onions per year, and it can look like all of them are required to make one pot of soup. There is also a common side effect. To cut down the cloud of syn-propanethial-S-oxide, the active ingredient that irritates the eyes and nose, onions should be refrigerated for a few hours after peeling but before slicing, and it doesn’t hurt to turn on a fan.

As Julia demonstrated a half century ago on her TV show, a pile of onions will reduce to a tiny mound of caramelized treasure once the water is cooked out. However, there is no easy way to speed up the process. High heat burns onions and makes them bitter. Long, slow caramelization in butter turns the strands golden brown and produces flavorful treasure.

Not A Cheese Soup

Cheese soups like broccoli and cheddar are guilty delights, especially as a sandwich dip, but cheese assumes another role in onion soups. Traditionally, French onion soup is topped with sweet, nutty Gruyère, which melts into gooeyness but doesn’t dissolve. Many cooks use a mix of aged mountain cheeses ranging from Emmentaler and Comté to Manchego and Raclette.

One doesn’t need to be a cheesemonger to decide which cheese to choose, but rather play around with varieties. Caciotta al Tartufo adds an infusion of black truffle perfume and Camembert becomes a creamy crouton atop tomato soup. Cheeses to avoid include Mozzarella and Provolone, which tend to become stringy and rubbery. Queso Fresco and Feta are best sprinkled on soups like posole and gazpacho when served.

Featured as a haute menu item, onion soup is perceived as being too fancy and time-consuming to make at home. Once cooks make a batch, it becomes part of their repertoire, serving it as Julia suggested during a football game, as Sunday night supper or as a midnight snack.

John Lehndorff hosts Radio Nibbles weekly on KGNU-FM in Boulder, CO. You can listen to his podcast here.

ONIONS AND CHEESE: 10 GREAT VARIATIONS

Some of the world’s favorite dishes star onions and cheese including:

10 Raw red onion on a cheeseburger with sharp Cheddar
9 Green onion and Triple Crème quiche
8 Spaetzle with caramelized onions and Emmentaler
7 Focaccia with onions, caramelized garlic, Chèvre and rosemary
6 Cheddar grits (or polenta) with chives and shrimp
5 Paneer- and onion-stuffed paratha flatbread
4 Mac and cheese with Mascarpone and roasted cippolini
3 Scrambled eggs with Comté and sautéed shallots
2 Kartoshnik potato cake with cheese and yellow onions
1 Asadero cheese and white onion enchiladas with red chile sauce

French Onion Soup

Courtesy of National Onion Association

Ingredients:
4 sweet yellow onions, peeled, thinly sliced
1 red onion, peeled, thinly sliced
1 large shallot, diced
4 Tbsp butter
1 Tbsp olive oil
3 Tbsp flour
3 qts broth
1 cup white wine
1 bay leaf
½ tsp thyme
½ tsp salt
Fresh ground black pepper, to taste
Dense crusty bread, thickly sliced
Olive oil or melted butter
3 cups grated Gruyère or mixed cheeses

Garnish: Chopped green onions, snipped chives

Optional: whole garlic cloves, 1/3 cup dry Sherry, Marsala or Cognac

In a deep soup pan, melt butter with oil, add onions and stir. There should be 7 to 8 cups of sliced onions. Let the onions cook covered over low heat for about 30 minutes or until translucent and soft. Remove the cover, raise the heat to medium and cook for another 30 minutes or so, stirring very frequently, until onions turn a dark golden brown. Add the flour and keep stirring for about 5 minutes until the flour absorbs the fat and turns light brown. Add 2 cups of broth and stir until flour is dissolved. Remove from heat and add the remaining broth, wine, bay leaf and thyme. Simmer gently for about 45 minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Cut the bread in slices at least 1½-inches thick, brush with butter or olive oil on both sides. For good measure, rub the toast with raw garlic cloves to give it a hint of garlic flavor. Toast in a 300-degree oven, flipping once, until browned. Bring the onion soup to a boil and then reduce heat. Add wine or Cognac. Pour soup into individual oven-proof bowls or casseroles on a cookie sheet. Fill the top of each with toasted bread and liberally pile each with shredded cheese. Place the soup in a 350-degree oven for about 20 minutes or until soup is teaming and cheese is melted. The final step is to place each casserole under a hot broiler to brown the cheese. Remove the soup, garnish with green onions or chives and serve immediately.

(Inspired by recipes from Julia Child and the National Onion Assn.)

In the region of Andalusia in Spain, Cebollada con Almendras is a popular soup. This soothing variation has a mild, crowd-pleasing appeal.

Spanish Almond-Onion Soup

Ingredients:
1 Tbsp
butter
3 Tbsp olive oil
6 cups (approx.) thinly-sliced red onions
3 large garlic cloves, minced
¾ cup blanched almonds, toasted
3 to 4 qts chicken broth
1 cup white wine (dry)
1 bay leaf
Salt, freshly ground black pepper, to taste
1 pinch saffron strands
Crusty bread, sliced, toasted
½ cup shaved Parmesan
4 Tbsp sliced almonds, toasted

Heat butter and oil in a saucepan, add onions and garlic, and stir over low heat for about 25 minutes until soft and translucent. Grind toasted, blanched almonds in a blender until very fine add about 1 cup broth and blend until very smooth. Add almond mixture to onions with the remaining broth, the wine and bay leaf. Bring to a simmer, cover and cook for 20 minutes. Add the saffron thread, simmer for 10 minutes and season to taste with salt and pepper.

To serve, ladle soup into individual heat-proof bowls on a baking sheet. Top each bowl with a slice of toast and sprinkle with Parmesan. Place bowls under the broiler for about 30 seconds until cheese is melted and lightly browned. Garnish with toasted sliced almonds. Serve immediately.


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As a kid I never liked fried eggs, they always had to be scrambled or hard boiled. Man looking back I see that I truly missed out on something amazing. Now I just can’t get enough of fried eggs. I am speaking fried eggs for breakfast, lunch and dinner. They never bore me, there are just too many variations out there, waiting to be savored (by me and maybe you and possibly us both?).

I find that preparing fried eggs in a traditional Turkish Copper Egg Pan does so much for the whole experience. Similar to a Japanese Tea Ceremony but with eggs and much less effort. These pans are a must in Turkey if you are preparing eggs, especially fried eggs. There is a hundred percent change that when you eat out in Turkey and order eggs they will be served in one of these. Also you are supposed to eat the eggs out of the copper pan, no plates needed, no silverware needed. Just the pan full of eggs, you, your hand and a piece of fresh bread = Heaven.

But of course you can prepare your eggs just as well in a good quality Cast Iron Skillet. Just make sure that the skillet or pan you use has an anti-stick bottom or else it will be a pain to clean the remains of your fried eggs.


Arkansas: At the Corner (Little Rock)

Located in the heart of downtown Little Rock and open at 7 a.m. for breakfast during the week, At the Corner uses locally seasonal produce and scratch-made diner classics. You’ll find the expected omelettes, pancakes, breakfast platters, and biscuits and gravy, but there are plenty of surprises, too: don’t miss the Wafflewich (a waffle sandwich with an egg, Cheddar, spiced maple syrup, and breakfast meat) Breakfast Bologna (bologna, pickled onion, smoked gouda, fried egg, beef bacon jam, and lemon thyme aïoli on a ciabatta) and toasts (ricotta and jam, mushroom and kale, or cranberry goat cheese and sweet potatoes). There are also a couple healthy bowls, including one filled with egg whites, house-roasted turkey, kale, farro, sweet potatoes, benne seeds, candied beets, cranberry goat cheese, and spicy maple.


South A Scramble

With a focus on Sonoma County cuisine, Liza Hinman, chef at The Spinster Sisters, combines locally grown ingredients and international influences to create an ever-changing menu of imaginative fare. This deceptively simple yet delicious dish is named after the Santa Rosa street that the restaurant calls home.

  • 10 large eggs
  • 3 tablespoons heavy cream or milk
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt, plus more to taste
  • 4 slices bacon, diced
  • 2 tablespoons canola oil
  • ¼ cup thin-sliced yellow onion
  • ⅔ cup diced zucchini
  • ½ cup heirloom cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 3 tablespoons chèvre-style goat cheese
  • 6 basil leaves, cut into ribbons
  • 1 tablespoon thin-sliced chives
  • 1 tablespoon fine-chopped parsley
  • Black pepper, to taste

Crack eggs into medium bowl. Add cream or milk and 1½ teaspoons salt. Whisk thoroughly to combine, and set aside.

Warm nonstick sauté pan over medium heat. Add bacon and cook, stirring occasionally. Transfer to paper towel–lined plate. Set aside.

Add 1 tablespoon oil to pan. Add onion and ¼ teaspoon salt. Reduce heat to low. Stir onions often until they begin to brown. Remove onions, and wipe pan clean.

Return pan to medium heat. Add zucchini, and cook until it begins to soften, 3–4 minutes. Sprinkle with ¼ teaspoon salt. Add cherry tomatoes, and return cooked bacon and onions to pan. Cook for 1 minute.

Raise heat to medium-high. Pour in egg mixture and allow to set for 45 seconds. Stir gently with rubber spatula until eggs are scrambled and cooked through. Sprinkle with goat cheese and herbs. Toss to incorporate, and remove from heat. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Serves 6.

Ela Jean Beedle, who’s the wine buyer for The Spinster Sisters, suggests Suriol Brut Nature Rosat Cava, a sparkling rosé from Spain. “An ideal balance of bright fruit and savory minerality will stand up to the rich bacon and deep caramelized onion and lift up more delicate flavors of sweet tomatoes and peppery basil. Also, what’s brunch without bubbles?”

To expand your options, stay in the Old World with a Crémant d’Alsace rosé. These 100% Pinot Noir sparklers have little to no dosage added, so they’re bracingly fresh with poppy red-fruit notes to play off the tomatoes and herbs. Like the Cava recommended above, they’re made in the traditional method, with a minimum of nine months spent aging on lees, giving them a robust body to handle the bacon and cheese.


50 Inspiring Omelet Filling Ideas

Get ideas for what to put in an omelet and healthy ingredients to add to jazz up your egg breakfast.

In the breakfast hierarchy, the omelet ranks up there with the waffle, eggs Benny and the breakfast taco. Ready in minutes, it&aposs the perfect protein-packed vehicle for all kinds of ingredients, whether you&aposre hungry for an over-the-top brunch or a lean weekday power breakfast.

Cooking an omelet couldn&apost be easier. Just whisk together some eggs, cook them in a nonstick pan with a little oil or butter, add the filling of your choice, fold and serve.

That said, there is some finesse involved in a making a successful omelet. Get step-by-step instructions here.

To help inspire your next omelet-making endeavor, we&aposve put together some quick tips and five filling categories, to help construct countless winning combinations. The anatomy of a truly great omelet is broken down below, so even the most kitchen-averse can get out of a breakfast rut and serve up an omelet with flair.

Pictured recipe: Garden-Fresh Omelets

The best cheeses for an omelet

Besides eggs, cheese is the most integral ingredient in an omelet. No matter how straightforward or eclectic you want to get with your fillings, this creamy buffer helps hold it together.

There&aposs nothing wrong with choosing classic grated Cheddar to complement some crispy bacon or well-seared breakfast sausage, but a softer cheese, like chèvre or an herby Boursin, amplifies the gooey factor and leaves you with creamy bite after creamy bite. Softer cheeses, stirred together with your proteins and cooked veggies, also help with ingredient integration, assuring that every bite has a little bit of everything.

  • Boursin
  • Ricotta
  • Cream cheese
  • Chèvre
  • Feta
  • Pimiento cheese
  • Gruyère
  • Cheddar
  • Fontina
  • Mozzarella
  • Parmesan

The best meats for an omelet

You can stuff an omelet with just about any cooked meat: bacon, crab, sausage, sliced ham from your fridge&aposs deli drawer, even lobster. Chef John Currence of Big Bad Breakfast in Oxford, Mississippi, admits that he sometimes throws in leftover fried chicken or shrimp and grits. The easygoing versatility of the omelet is part of its appeal.

But here are a couple of things to keep in mind when adding your preferred meat(s): First, most of them already have lots of salt, so go easy when seasoning your eggs. Second, smaller cuts are better. Nobody wants to bite into a massive piece of fish, or accidentally pull out an entire strip of bacon in one bite. Whatever your protein of choice, take the time to cut it into manageable pieces.

  • Smoked salmon or trout
  • Bacon
  • Pancetta
  • Chorizo
  • Crab
  • Deli ham
  • Prosciutto or country ham
  • Breakfast sausage
  • Grilled shrimp
  • Lobster
  • Thinly sliced steak

The best vegetables for an omelet

A lot of the same rules outlined in the meat section also apply here: namely, smaller equals better. So, slice those shiitakes, dice your tomatoes and smash your potatoes.

Also, reserve the raw veggies for crudité and salads. Everything-from leeks and bell pepper to spring vegetables-needs to be cooked, preferably with good-quality butter or olive oil and a little bit of kosher salt. The one exception is avocados, which can be added in any form, whether thinly sliced, dolloped in guacamole or grilled and cubed.

  • Saut mushrooms
  • Spinach
  • Avocado
  • Tomatoes
  • Artichoke hearts
  • Roasted potatoes or hash browns
  • Saut asparagus
  • Leeks
  • Scallions
  • Caramelized onion
  • Red or yellow bell pepper
  • Chile peppers (such as jalapeño or poblano)

The best herbs for an omelet

Do you know what separates most home-prepped omelets from the fancy ones at your local bistro? Fresh herbs. Seriously, it&aposs that simple.

Omelets inherently veer toward the heavier side, so balancing them out with a pop of bright freshness is crucial.

Other delicious omelet fillings

We expend so much energy thinking about what goes inside an omelet that we often fail to think about the outside. But if you really want to push your omelet creation to the next level, consider the extras.

Think stewed tomatoes or okra ladled over a Cajun omelet brimming with blue crab. Or a schmear of sour cream and caviar to enhance a smoked salmon omelet with dill.

Leftover veggie chili going to waste? Go full hangover-buster by serving it alongside an omelet stuffed with Cheddar, scallions and hash browns. The idea is to go fridge- (and pantry-) diving to upgrade even the most well-thought-out dish.

  • Sour cream
  • Caviar
  • Kimchi
  • Mixed greens (for a simple dressed salad)
  • Pesto
  • Hot sauce
  • Crushed red pepper
  • Stewed okra
  • Chili
  • Old Bay seasoning

Delicious omelet combinations to try

The options for omelet fillings are endless, but these mini recipes will kick you off toward your own creative combinations.


Vegan/vegetarian item: #4 Cowboy quinoa veggie burger

The cowboy quinoa veggie burger is formed from multi-color quinoa, black beans, corn, red peppers and savory seasonings. Forgo the microwave (unless you want a puck of mush) and bake this bad boy in the oven for optimal crisp. Serve on a brioche bun with the toppings of your choice (maybe a cheeky sandwich-sliced pickle), and you’ve got yourself a next-level burger.


South A Scramble

With a focus on Sonoma County cuisine, Liza Hinman, chef at The Spinster Sisters, combines locally grown ingredients and international influences to create an ever-changing menu of imaginative fare. This deceptively simple yet delicious dish is named after the Santa Rosa street that the restaurant calls home.

  • 10 large eggs
  • 3 tablespoons heavy cream or milk
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt, plus more to taste
  • 4 slices bacon, diced
  • 2 tablespoons canola oil
  • ¼ cup thin-sliced yellow onion
  • ⅔ cup diced zucchini
  • ½ cup heirloom cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 3 tablespoons chèvre-style goat cheese
  • 6 basil leaves, cut into ribbons
  • 1 tablespoon thin-sliced chives
  • 1 tablespoon fine-chopped parsley
  • Black pepper, to taste

Crack eggs into medium bowl. Add cream or milk and 1½ teaspoons salt. Whisk thoroughly to combine, and set aside.

Warm nonstick sauté pan over medium heat. Add bacon and cook, stirring occasionally. Transfer to paper towel–lined plate. Set aside.

Add 1 tablespoon oil to pan. Add onion and ¼ teaspoon salt. Reduce heat to low. Stir onions often until they begin to brown. Remove onions, and wipe pan clean.

Return pan to medium heat. Add zucchini, and cook until it begins to soften, 3–4 minutes. Sprinkle with ¼ teaspoon salt. Add cherry tomatoes, and return cooked bacon and onions to pan. Cook for 1 minute.

Raise heat to medium-high. Pour in egg mixture and allow to set for 45 seconds. Stir gently with rubber spatula until eggs are scrambled and cooked through. Sprinkle with goat cheese and herbs. Toss to incorporate, and remove from heat. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Serves 6.

Ela Jean Beedle, who’s the wine buyer for The Spinster Sisters, suggests Suriol Brut Nature Rosat Cava, a sparkling rosé from Spain. “An ideal balance of bright fruit and savory minerality will stand up to the rich bacon and deep caramelized onion and lift up more delicate flavors of sweet tomatoes and peppery basil. Also, what’s brunch without bubbles?”

To expand your options, stay in the Old World with a Crémant d’Alsace rosé. These 100% Pinot Noir sparklers have little to no dosage added, so they’re bracingly fresh with poppy red-fruit notes to play off the tomatoes and herbs. Like the Cava recommended above, they’re made in the traditional method, with a minimum of nine months spent aging on lees, giving them a robust body to handle the bacon and cheese.