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10 Times You Forgot to Wear Sunblock Slideshow

10 Times You Forgot to Wear Sunblock Slideshow


Most dermatologists recommend wearing the stuff 24/7, but too many of us are forgetting on these important occasions

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10 Times You Forgot to Wear Sunblock

istockphoto.com

Sunburns not only leave your skin an unappealing shade of red, they also exponentially increase your likelihood of melanoma. Despite the dangers of sunburns over time, many still neglect to apply (and reapply) sunblock when going to the beach, the pool, and the park. But those slip-ups aren’t from lack of awareness: Everyone knows they should be wearing sunscreen on those occasions. They’re just neglecting to do it anyway.

But did you know there are times when you really should really be wearing sunscreen but weren’t even aware? These tips aren’t for other obvious occasions, such as when you’re going on a hike or when you’re underwater — although by now, you should know to slather up then, too. We want to reveal to you all of the times when the sun’s rays are bombarding your skin and you’re not even paying attention.

Many dermatologists recommend wearing sunscreen all day, 24/7. However, for most, that isn’t realistic. If you’re being choosy about when to apply, consider adding a layer or two on these 10 unexpected occasions.

A morning run

At 6 a.m., your brain is still waiting to wake up — but the sun is waiting for no one. Regardless of how tired or groggy you are before heading out the door, make sure you apply your sunblock. A clear summer morning is ideal for more than just the temperature of your run. It’s ideal for sunburns, too!

At the office

Even though your office may be indoors, you could be at risk for a burn or at the least some sun damage. UV rays penetrate through most windows. Especially if you’re seated by a window, make sure you protect your skin.

Drinking outside

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Experts have insisted that drinkers have a 20 percent greater risk of melanoma than non-drinkers. Additionally, alcohol reduces your brain’s focus on the consequences of your actions. Less likely to remember the danger and more likely to experience the adverse effects, you’re at risk when you’re sipping outside.

Late in the day

Your sunscreen wears off over time — that’s why it’s recommended that you reapply every two hours to protect from a burn. But just because it’s recommended doesn’t mean people do it. In fact, many consumers apply in the morning and then neglect to reapply throughout the day. That makes dusk, the hours where the sun is still shining but it’s nearly dark, one of the most vulnerable times of day for damage.

Long car rides

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Just like your window at the office, your car window is equally ineffective at filtering the sun’s rays. Surrounded by windows on all sides, you’re at risk while seated in your car. Bring a tube of sunblock with you on the road so you can reapply as needed.

Shopping trips

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Many people think of shopping trips as an indoor activity. However, many stores have entrances located outside and are surrounded by vast, scorching parking lots. Protect your skin during these precious minutes of exposure by applying before you hit the mall.

Well before you leave the house

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Many people don’t know this, but sunblock takes 15 minutes to sink in before it starts working most effectively. According to Dr. John Wolf, chairman of the Department of Dermatology at the Baylor College of Medicine, waiting 15 minutes “allows it to bind to the stratum corneum, the outer layer of the skin. Once it’s bound there, it’s going to last longer and be harder for it to get rubbed off or washed away.”

So putting on a layer right before you head out or enter the pool is less effective compared to planning a little further ahead.

When it’s cloudy outside

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When you’re wearing long sleeves

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Unless you’re wearing specially made sun protection clothing, your long sleeves aren’t doing much good. According to the Skin Cancer Foundation, “Under a microscope, we can see lots of spaces between the fibers; UV can pass directly through these holes to reach the skin.” The best way to truly block the rays is — you guessed it — sunblock.

Winter

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Like Bruce E. Katz, the director of JUVA Skin and Laser Center in New York, told The Huffington Post, “UVA radiation reaches deeper into the skin and contributes to wrinkles and skin cancer risk.” And those rays don’t go away in the winter. In some cases, such as when the rays reflect off of white snow, your exposure to UV rays can actually be greater than when you’re standing under the summer sun.


You Need to Wear Sunscreen Every Day. Here Are 15 of the Best.

I went through a serious Love Island phase a few years ago. For the uninitiated, the incredibly long TV show follows a group of sexy singles living in a tropical mansion whose only goals are to look smoking hot and couple up with each other. The whole thing is an elaborate forced mating ritual: Contestants hang out by the pool all day, work out in the open air, compete in challenges on the beach, and hardly ever wear anything more than swimsuits. But as the fair-skinned among them grew redder and redder by the day, instead of becoming invested in their love lives, I found myself thinking &ldquoI really hope they&rsquore wearing sunscreen.&rdquo

There was never any mention of sunscreen on Love Island and that&rsquos because, let&rsquos face it, sunscreen is not the sexiest. But it is important. Sun damage can cause your skin to age faster, pigmentation issues like sun spots and, most importantly, skin cancer&mdashthe most common form of cancer. Wearing sunscreen is your best defense and you should wear it if you&rsquore hanging out by the pool or going for a run outside, but also on cloudy days and when you&rsquore inside too. &ldquoIf you are out in the daylight, you are exposed to UV rays. Even incidental sunlight exposure on your lunch break or your commute to work adds up over a lifetime,&rdquo says dermatologist Joshua Zeichner, M.D., Director of Cosmetic and Clinical Research, Department of Dermatology at Mount Sinai. That means wearing sunscreen on the daily, not just when you&rsquore at the beach, is essential.

But the reason most people don&rsquot do that is because sunscreen is confusing. The American Academy of Dermatology recommends wearing SPF 30 at minimum and looking for screens that say broad spectrum on the label (meaning they protect against both UVA and UVB light). There are also mineral and chemical sunscreens to consider. Mineral sunscreens use materials like zinc oxide to form a physical barrier on the skin that blocks UV light. Chemical sunscreens, on the other hand, absorb and disperse the light rays. Which you choose is mostly &ldquopersonal preference because both are effective,&rdquo says Dr. Zeichner, who usually recommends mineral screens for people with sensitive skin. Facial sunscreens, which are designed to use on just your face, come in both forms and often have additional ingredients like antioxidants and hydrating factors that might not be found in body sunscreens.

No matter which sunscreen you choose, the most important thing is that you use it properly. That means reapplying it every two hours, especially if you&rsquore out in the sun, and making sure you use enough. &ldquoYou should use a quarter size dollop for the full face and a shot glass amount for the rest of the body&mdashwhich is more than most people are using,&rdquo says Dr. Zeichner. And if you&rsquore wondering, yes, you can still get tan while wearing sunscreen even if you use that much. But the absolute most important thing when choosing a sunscreen, he says, is finding one you will actually use. &ldquoIf it&rsquos not on your skin, it won&rsquot protect you.&rdquo Start with this list and you&rsquore halfway there.


You Need to Wear Sunscreen Every Day. Here Are 15 of the Best.

I went through a serious Love Island phase a few years ago. For the uninitiated, the incredibly long TV show follows a group of sexy singles living in a tropical mansion whose only goals are to look smoking hot and couple up with each other. The whole thing is an elaborate forced mating ritual: Contestants hang out by the pool all day, work out in the open air, compete in challenges on the beach, and hardly ever wear anything more than swimsuits. But as the fair-skinned among them grew redder and redder by the day, instead of becoming invested in their love lives, I found myself thinking &ldquoI really hope they&rsquore wearing sunscreen.&rdquo

There was never any mention of sunscreen on Love Island and that&rsquos because, let&rsquos face it, sunscreen is not the sexiest. But it is important. Sun damage can cause your skin to age faster, pigmentation issues like sun spots and, most importantly, skin cancer&mdashthe most common form of cancer. Wearing sunscreen is your best defense and you should wear it if you&rsquore hanging out by the pool or going for a run outside, but also on cloudy days and when you&rsquore inside too. &ldquoIf you are out in the daylight, you are exposed to UV rays. Even incidental sunlight exposure on your lunch break or your commute to work adds up over a lifetime,&rdquo says dermatologist Joshua Zeichner, M.D., Director of Cosmetic and Clinical Research, Department of Dermatology at Mount Sinai. That means wearing sunscreen on the daily, not just when you&rsquore at the beach, is essential.

But the reason most people don&rsquot do that is because sunscreen is confusing. The American Academy of Dermatology recommends wearing SPF 30 at minimum and looking for screens that say broad spectrum on the label (meaning they protect against both UVA and UVB light). There are also mineral and chemical sunscreens to consider. Mineral sunscreens use materials like zinc oxide to form a physical barrier on the skin that blocks UV light. Chemical sunscreens, on the other hand, absorb and disperse the light rays. Which you choose is mostly &ldquopersonal preference because both are effective,&rdquo says Dr. Zeichner, who usually recommends mineral screens for people with sensitive skin. Facial sunscreens, which are designed to use on just your face, come in both forms and often have additional ingredients like antioxidants and hydrating factors that might not be found in body sunscreens.

No matter which sunscreen you choose, the most important thing is that you use it properly. That means reapplying it every two hours, especially if you&rsquore out in the sun, and making sure you use enough. &ldquoYou should use a quarter size dollop for the full face and a shot glass amount for the rest of the body&mdashwhich is more than most people are using,&rdquo says Dr. Zeichner. And if you&rsquore wondering, yes, you can still get tan while wearing sunscreen even if you use that much. But the absolute most important thing when choosing a sunscreen, he says, is finding one you will actually use. &ldquoIf it&rsquos not on your skin, it won&rsquot protect you.&rdquo Start with this list and you&rsquore halfway there.


You Need to Wear Sunscreen Every Day. Here Are 15 of the Best.

I went through a serious Love Island phase a few years ago. For the uninitiated, the incredibly long TV show follows a group of sexy singles living in a tropical mansion whose only goals are to look smoking hot and couple up with each other. The whole thing is an elaborate forced mating ritual: Contestants hang out by the pool all day, work out in the open air, compete in challenges on the beach, and hardly ever wear anything more than swimsuits. But as the fair-skinned among them grew redder and redder by the day, instead of becoming invested in their love lives, I found myself thinking &ldquoI really hope they&rsquore wearing sunscreen.&rdquo

There was never any mention of sunscreen on Love Island and that&rsquos because, let&rsquos face it, sunscreen is not the sexiest. But it is important. Sun damage can cause your skin to age faster, pigmentation issues like sun spots and, most importantly, skin cancer&mdashthe most common form of cancer. Wearing sunscreen is your best defense and you should wear it if you&rsquore hanging out by the pool or going for a run outside, but also on cloudy days and when you&rsquore inside too. &ldquoIf you are out in the daylight, you are exposed to UV rays. Even incidental sunlight exposure on your lunch break or your commute to work adds up over a lifetime,&rdquo says dermatologist Joshua Zeichner, M.D., Director of Cosmetic and Clinical Research, Department of Dermatology at Mount Sinai. That means wearing sunscreen on the daily, not just when you&rsquore at the beach, is essential.

But the reason most people don&rsquot do that is because sunscreen is confusing. The American Academy of Dermatology recommends wearing SPF 30 at minimum and looking for screens that say broad spectrum on the label (meaning they protect against both UVA and UVB light). There are also mineral and chemical sunscreens to consider. Mineral sunscreens use materials like zinc oxide to form a physical barrier on the skin that blocks UV light. Chemical sunscreens, on the other hand, absorb and disperse the light rays. Which you choose is mostly &ldquopersonal preference because both are effective,&rdquo says Dr. Zeichner, who usually recommends mineral screens for people with sensitive skin. Facial sunscreens, which are designed to use on just your face, come in both forms and often have additional ingredients like antioxidants and hydrating factors that might not be found in body sunscreens.

No matter which sunscreen you choose, the most important thing is that you use it properly. That means reapplying it every two hours, especially if you&rsquore out in the sun, and making sure you use enough. &ldquoYou should use a quarter size dollop for the full face and a shot glass amount for the rest of the body&mdashwhich is more than most people are using,&rdquo says Dr. Zeichner. And if you&rsquore wondering, yes, you can still get tan while wearing sunscreen even if you use that much. But the absolute most important thing when choosing a sunscreen, he says, is finding one you will actually use. &ldquoIf it&rsquos not on your skin, it won&rsquot protect you.&rdquo Start with this list and you&rsquore halfway there.


You Need to Wear Sunscreen Every Day. Here Are 15 of the Best.

I went through a serious Love Island phase a few years ago. For the uninitiated, the incredibly long TV show follows a group of sexy singles living in a tropical mansion whose only goals are to look smoking hot and couple up with each other. The whole thing is an elaborate forced mating ritual: Contestants hang out by the pool all day, work out in the open air, compete in challenges on the beach, and hardly ever wear anything more than swimsuits. But as the fair-skinned among them grew redder and redder by the day, instead of becoming invested in their love lives, I found myself thinking &ldquoI really hope they&rsquore wearing sunscreen.&rdquo

There was never any mention of sunscreen on Love Island and that&rsquos because, let&rsquos face it, sunscreen is not the sexiest. But it is important. Sun damage can cause your skin to age faster, pigmentation issues like sun spots and, most importantly, skin cancer&mdashthe most common form of cancer. Wearing sunscreen is your best defense and you should wear it if you&rsquore hanging out by the pool or going for a run outside, but also on cloudy days and when you&rsquore inside too. &ldquoIf you are out in the daylight, you are exposed to UV rays. Even incidental sunlight exposure on your lunch break or your commute to work adds up over a lifetime,&rdquo says dermatologist Joshua Zeichner, M.D., Director of Cosmetic and Clinical Research, Department of Dermatology at Mount Sinai. That means wearing sunscreen on the daily, not just when you&rsquore at the beach, is essential.

But the reason most people don&rsquot do that is because sunscreen is confusing. The American Academy of Dermatology recommends wearing SPF 30 at minimum and looking for screens that say broad spectrum on the label (meaning they protect against both UVA and UVB light). There are also mineral and chemical sunscreens to consider. Mineral sunscreens use materials like zinc oxide to form a physical barrier on the skin that blocks UV light. Chemical sunscreens, on the other hand, absorb and disperse the light rays. Which you choose is mostly &ldquopersonal preference because both are effective,&rdquo says Dr. Zeichner, who usually recommends mineral screens for people with sensitive skin. Facial sunscreens, which are designed to use on just your face, come in both forms and often have additional ingredients like antioxidants and hydrating factors that might not be found in body sunscreens.

No matter which sunscreen you choose, the most important thing is that you use it properly. That means reapplying it every two hours, especially if you&rsquore out in the sun, and making sure you use enough. &ldquoYou should use a quarter size dollop for the full face and a shot glass amount for the rest of the body&mdashwhich is more than most people are using,&rdquo says Dr. Zeichner. And if you&rsquore wondering, yes, you can still get tan while wearing sunscreen even if you use that much. But the absolute most important thing when choosing a sunscreen, he says, is finding one you will actually use. &ldquoIf it&rsquos not on your skin, it won&rsquot protect you.&rdquo Start with this list and you&rsquore halfway there.


You Need to Wear Sunscreen Every Day. Here Are 15 of the Best.

I went through a serious Love Island phase a few years ago. For the uninitiated, the incredibly long TV show follows a group of sexy singles living in a tropical mansion whose only goals are to look smoking hot and couple up with each other. The whole thing is an elaborate forced mating ritual: Contestants hang out by the pool all day, work out in the open air, compete in challenges on the beach, and hardly ever wear anything more than swimsuits. But as the fair-skinned among them grew redder and redder by the day, instead of becoming invested in their love lives, I found myself thinking &ldquoI really hope they&rsquore wearing sunscreen.&rdquo

There was never any mention of sunscreen on Love Island and that&rsquos because, let&rsquos face it, sunscreen is not the sexiest. But it is important. Sun damage can cause your skin to age faster, pigmentation issues like sun spots and, most importantly, skin cancer&mdashthe most common form of cancer. Wearing sunscreen is your best defense and you should wear it if you&rsquore hanging out by the pool or going for a run outside, but also on cloudy days and when you&rsquore inside too. &ldquoIf you are out in the daylight, you are exposed to UV rays. Even incidental sunlight exposure on your lunch break or your commute to work adds up over a lifetime,&rdquo says dermatologist Joshua Zeichner, M.D., Director of Cosmetic and Clinical Research, Department of Dermatology at Mount Sinai. That means wearing sunscreen on the daily, not just when you&rsquore at the beach, is essential.

But the reason most people don&rsquot do that is because sunscreen is confusing. The American Academy of Dermatology recommends wearing SPF 30 at minimum and looking for screens that say broad spectrum on the label (meaning they protect against both UVA and UVB light). There are also mineral and chemical sunscreens to consider. Mineral sunscreens use materials like zinc oxide to form a physical barrier on the skin that blocks UV light. Chemical sunscreens, on the other hand, absorb and disperse the light rays. Which you choose is mostly &ldquopersonal preference because both are effective,&rdquo says Dr. Zeichner, who usually recommends mineral screens for people with sensitive skin. Facial sunscreens, which are designed to use on just your face, come in both forms and often have additional ingredients like antioxidants and hydrating factors that might not be found in body sunscreens.

No matter which sunscreen you choose, the most important thing is that you use it properly. That means reapplying it every two hours, especially if you&rsquore out in the sun, and making sure you use enough. &ldquoYou should use a quarter size dollop for the full face and a shot glass amount for the rest of the body&mdashwhich is more than most people are using,&rdquo says Dr. Zeichner. And if you&rsquore wondering, yes, you can still get tan while wearing sunscreen even if you use that much. But the absolute most important thing when choosing a sunscreen, he says, is finding one you will actually use. &ldquoIf it&rsquos not on your skin, it won&rsquot protect you.&rdquo Start with this list and you&rsquore halfway there.


You Need to Wear Sunscreen Every Day. Here Are 15 of the Best.

I went through a serious Love Island phase a few years ago. For the uninitiated, the incredibly long TV show follows a group of sexy singles living in a tropical mansion whose only goals are to look smoking hot and couple up with each other. The whole thing is an elaborate forced mating ritual: Contestants hang out by the pool all day, work out in the open air, compete in challenges on the beach, and hardly ever wear anything more than swimsuits. But as the fair-skinned among them grew redder and redder by the day, instead of becoming invested in their love lives, I found myself thinking &ldquoI really hope they&rsquore wearing sunscreen.&rdquo

There was never any mention of sunscreen on Love Island and that&rsquos because, let&rsquos face it, sunscreen is not the sexiest. But it is important. Sun damage can cause your skin to age faster, pigmentation issues like sun spots and, most importantly, skin cancer&mdashthe most common form of cancer. Wearing sunscreen is your best defense and you should wear it if you&rsquore hanging out by the pool or going for a run outside, but also on cloudy days and when you&rsquore inside too. &ldquoIf you are out in the daylight, you are exposed to UV rays. Even incidental sunlight exposure on your lunch break or your commute to work adds up over a lifetime,&rdquo says dermatologist Joshua Zeichner, M.D., Director of Cosmetic and Clinical Research, Department of Dermatology at Mount Sinai. That means wearing sunscreen on the daily, not just when you&rsquore at the beach, is essential.

But the reason most people don&rsquot do that is because sunscreen is confusing. The American Academy of Dermatology recommends wearing SPF 30 at minimum and looking for screens that say broad spectrum on the label (meaning they protect against both UVA and UVB light). There are also mineral and chemical sunscreens to consider. Mineral sunscreens use materials like zinc oxide to form a physical barrier on the skin that blocks UV light. Chemical sunscreens, on the other hand, absorb and disperse the light rays. Which you choose is mostly &ldquopersonal preference because both are effective,&rdquo says Dr. Zeichner, who usually recommends mineral screens for people with sensitive skin. Facial sunscreens, which are designed to use on just your face, come in both forms and often have additional ingredients like antioxidants and hydrating factors that might not be found in body sunscreens.

No matter which sunscreen you choose, the most important thing is that you use it properly. That means reapplying it every two hours, especially if you&rsquore out in the sun, and making sure you use enough. &ldquoYou should use a quarter size dollop for the full face and a shot glass amount for the rest of the body&mdashwhich is more than most people are using,&rdquo says Dr. Zeichner. And if you&rsquore wondering, yes, you can still get tan while wearing sunscreen even if you use that much. But the absolute most important thing when choosing a sunscreen, he says, is finding one you will actually use. &ldquoIf it&rsquos not on your skin, it won&rsquot protect you.&rdquo Start with this list and you&rsquore halfway there.


You Need to Wear Sunscreen Every Day. Here Are 15 of the Best.

I went through a serious Love Island phase a few years ago. For the uninitiated, the incredibly long TV show follows a group of sexy singles living in a tropical mansion whose only goals are to look smoking hot and couple up with each other. The whole thing is an elaborate forced mating ritual: Contestants hang out by the pool all day, work out in the open air, compete in challenges on the beach, and hardly ever wear anything more than swimsuits. But as the fair-skinned among them grew redder and redder by the day, instead of becoming invested in their love lives, I found myself thinking &ldquoI really hope they&rsquore wearing sunscreen.&rdquo

There was never any mention of sunscreen on Love Island and that&rsquos because, let&rsquos face it, sunscreen is not the sexiest. But it is important. Sun damage can cause your skin to age faster, pigmentation issues like sun spots and, most importantly, skin cancer&mdashthe most common form of cancer. Wearing sunscreen is your best defense and you should wear it if you&rsquore hanging out by the pool or going for a run outside, but also on cloudy days and when you&rsquore inside too. &ldquoIf you are out in the daylight, you are exposed to UV rays. Even incidental sunlight exposure on your lunch break or your commute to work adds up over a lifetime,&rdquo says dermatologist Joshua Zeichner, M.D., Director of Cosmetic and Clinical Research, Department of Dermatology at Mount Sinai. That means wearing sunscreen on the daily, not just when you&rsquore at the beach, is essential.

But the reason most people don&rsquot do that is because sunscreen is confusing. The American Academy of Dermatology recommends wearing SPF 30 at minimum and looking for screens that say broad spectrum on the label (meaning they protect against both UVA and UVB light). There are also mineral and chemical sunscreens to consider. Mineral sunscreens use materials like zinc oxide to form a physical barrier on the skin that blocks UV light. Chemical sunscreens, on the other hand, absorb and disperse the light rays. Which you choose is mostly &ldquopersonal preference because both are effective,&rdquo says Dr. Zeichner, who usually recommends mineral screens for people with sensitive skin. Facial sunscreens, which are designed to use on just your face, come in both forms and often have additional ingredients like antioxidants and hydrating factors that might not be found in body sunscreens.

No matter which sunscreen you choose, the most important thing is that you use it properly. That means reapplying it every two hours, especially if you&rsquore out in the sun, and making sure you use enough. &ldquoYou should use a quarter size dollop for the full face and a shot glass amount for the rest of the body&mdashwhich is more than most people are using,&rdquo says Dr. Zeichner. And if you&rsquore wondering, yes, you can still get tan while wearing sunscreen even if you use that much. But the absolute most important thing when choosing a sunscreen, he says, is finding one you will actually use. &ldquoIf it&rsquos not on your skin, it won&rsquot protect you.&rdquo Start with this list and you&rsquore halfway there.


You Need to Wear Sunscreen Every Day. Here Are 15 of the Best.

I went through a serious Love Island phase a few years ago. For the uninitiated, the incredibly long TV show follows a group of sexy singles living in a tropical mansion whose only goals are to look smoking hot and couple up with each other. The whole thing is an elaborate forced mating ritual: Contestants hang out by the pool all day, work out in the open air, compete in challenges on the beach, and hardly ever wear anything more than swimsuits. But as the fair-skinned among them grew redder and redder by the day, instead of becoming invested in their love lives, I found myself thinking &ldquoI really hope they&rsquore wearing sunscreen.&rdquo

There was never any mention of sunscreen on Love Island and that&rsquos because, let&rsquos face it, sunscreen is not the sexiest. But it is important. Sun damage can cause your skin to age faster, pigmentation issues like sun spots and, most importantly, skin cancer&mdashthe most common form of cancer. Wearing sunscreen is your best defense and you should wear it if you&rsquore hanging out by the pool or going for a run outside, but also on cloudy days and when you&rsquore inside too. &ldquoIf you are out in the daylight, you are exposed to UV rays. Even incidental sunlight exposure on your lunch break or your commute to work adds up over a lifetime,&rdquo says dermatologist Joshua Zeichner, M.D., Director of Cosmetic and Clinical Research, Department of Dermatology at Mount Sinai. That means wearing sunscreen on the daily, not just when you&rsquore at the beach, is essential.

But the reason most people don&rsquot do that is because sunscreen is confusing. The American Academy of Dermatology recommends wearing SPF 30 at minimum and looking for screens that say broad spectrum on the label (meaning they protect against both UVA and UVB light). There are also mineral and chemical sunscreens to consider. Mineral sunscreens use materials like zinc oxide to form a physical barrier on the skin that blocks UV light. Chemical sunscreens, on the other hand, absorb and disperse the light rays. Which you choose is mostly &ldquopersonal preference because both are effective,&rdquo says Dr. Zeichner, who usually recommends mineral screens for people with sensitive skin. Facial sunscreens, which are designed to use on just your face, come in both forms and often have additional ingredients like antioxidants and hydrating factors that might not be found in body sunscreens.

No matter which sunscreen you choose, the most important thing is that you use it properly. That means reapplying it every two hours, especially if you&rsquore out in the sun, and making sure you use enough. &ldquoYou should use a quarter size dollop for the full face and a shot glass amount for the rest of the body&mdashwhich is more than most people are using,&rdquo says Dr. Zeichner. And if you&rsquore wondering, yes, you can still get tan while wearing sunscreen even if you use that much. But the absolute most important thing when choosing a sunscreen, he says, is finding one you will actually use. &ldquoIf it&rsquos not on your skin, it won&rsquot protect you.&rdquo Start with this list and you&rsquore halfway there.


You Need to Wear Sunscreen Every Day. Here Are 15 of the Best.

I went through a serious Love Island phase a few years ago. For the uninitiated, the incredibly long TV show follows a group of sexy singles living in a tropical mansion whose only goals are to look smoking hot and couple up with each other. The whole thing is an elaborate forced mating ritual: Contestants hang out by the pool all day, work out in the open air, compete in challenges on the beach, and hardly ever wear anything more than swimsuits. But as the fair-skinned among them grew redder and redder by the day, instead of becoming invested in their love lives, I found myself thinking &ldquoI really hope they&rsquore wearing sunscreen.&rdquo

There was never any mention of sunscreen on Love Island and that&rsquos because, let&rsquos face it, sunscreen is not the sexiest. But it is important. Sun damage can cause your skin to age faster, pigmentation issues like sun spots and, most importantly, skin cancer&mdashthe most common form of cancer. Wearing sunscreen is your best defense and you should wear it if you&rsquore hanging out by the pool or going for a run outside, but also on cloudy days and when you&rsquore inside too. &ldquoIf you are out in the daylight, you are exposed to UV rays. Even incidental sunlight exposure on your lunch break or your commute to work adds up over a lifetime,&rdquo says dermatologist Joshua Zeichner, M.D., Director of Cosmetic and Clinical Research, Department of Dermatology at Mount Sinai. That means wearing sunscreen on the daily, not just when you&rsquore at the beach, is essential.

But the reason most people don&rsquot do that is because sunscreen is confusing. The American Academy of Dermatology recommends wearing SPF 30 at minimum and looking for screens that say broad spectrum on the label (meaning they protect against both UVA and UVB light). There are also mineral and chemical sunscreens to consider. Mineral sunscreens use materials like zinc oxide to form a physical barrier on the skin that blocks UV light. Chemical sunscreens, on the other hand, absorb and disperse the light rays. Which you choose is mostly &ldquopersonal preference because both are effective,&rdquo says Dr. Zeichner, who usually recommends mineral screens for people with sensitive skin. Facial sunscreens, which are designed to use on just your face, come in both forms and often have additional ingredients like antioxidants and hydrating factors that might not be found in body sunscreens.

No matter which sunscreen you choose, the most important thing is that you use it properly. That means reapplying it every two hours, especially if you&rsquore out in the sun, and making sure you use enough. &ldquoYou should use a quarter size dollop for the full face and a shot glass amount for the rest of the body&mdashwhich is more than most people are using,&rdquo says Dr. Zeichner. And if you&rsquore wondering, yes, you can still get tan while wearing sunscreen even if you use that much. But the absolute most important thing when choosing a sunscreen, he says, is finding one you will actually use. &ldquoIf it&rsquos not on your skin, it won&rsquot protect you.&rdquo Start with this list and you&rsquore halfway there.


You Need to Wear Sunscreen Every Day. Here Are 15 of the Best.

I went through a serious Love Island phase a few years ago. For the uninitiated, the incredibly long TV show follows a group of sexy singles living in a tropical mansion whose only goals are to look smoking hot and couple up with each other. The whole thing is an elaborate forced mating ritual: Contestants hang out by the pool all day, work out in the open air, compete in challenges on the beach, and hardly ever wear anything more than swimsuits. But as the fair-skinned among them grew redder and redder by the day, instead of becoming invested in their love lives, I found myself thinking &ldquoI really hope they&rsquore wearing sunscreen.&rdquo

There was never any mention of sunscreen on Love Island and that&rsquos because, let&rsquos face it, sunscreen is not the sexiest. But it is important. Sun damage can cause your skin to age faster, pigmentation issues like sun spots and, most importantly, skin cancer&mdashthe most common form of cancer. Wearing sunscreen is your best defense and you should wear it if you&rsquore hanging out by the pool or going for a run outside, but also on cloudy days and when you&rsquore inside too. &ldquoIf you are out in the daylight, you are exposed to UV rays. Even incidental sunlight exposure on your lunch break or your commute to work adds up over a lifetime,&rdquo says dermatologist Joshua Zeichner, M.D., Director of Cosmetic and Clinical Research, Department of Dermatology at Mount Sinai. That means wearing sunscreen on the daily, not just when you&rsquore at the beach, is essential.

But the reason most people don&rsquot do that is because sunscreen is confusing. The American Academy of Dermatology recommends wearing SPF 30 at minimum and looking for screens that say broad spectrum on the label (meaning they protect against both UVA and UVB light). There are also mineral and chemical sunscreens to consider. Mineral sunscreens use materials like zinc oxide to form a physical barrier on the skin that blocks UV light. Chemical sunscreens, on the other hand, absorb and disperse the light rays. Which you choose is mostly &ldquopersonal preference because both are effective,&rdquo says Dr. Zeichner, who usually recommends mineral screens for people with sensitive skin. Facial sunscreens, which are designed to use on just your face, come in both forms and often have additional ingredients like antioxidants and hydrating factors that might not be found in body sunscreens.

No matter which sunscreen you choose, the most important thing is that you use it properly. That means reapplying it every two hours, especially if you&rsquore out in the sun, and making sure you use enough. &ldquoYou should use a quarter size dollop for the full face and a shot glass amount for the rest of the body&mdashwhich is more than most people are using,&rdquo says Dr. Zeichner. And if you&rsquore wondering, yes, you can still get tan while wearing sunscreen even if you use that much. But the absolute most important thing when choosing a sunscreen, he says, is finding one you will actually use. &ldquoIf it&rsquos not on your skin, it won&rsquot protect you.&rdquo Start with this list and you&rsquore halfway there.